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Rev. Friederich Wilhelm Bindemann 

Rev. Friederich Wilhelm Bindemann

Male 1790 - 1865

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  • Prefix  Rev. 
    Birth  31 Jul 1790  Koethen, Potsdam, Prussia Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
    Gender  Male 
    Religion  1834  German Protestant Evangelical Church, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location 
    German Protestant Evangelical 
    • Rev. Bindemann formed the church in 1834 now known as St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church.
    Occupation  1851  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    Lutheran Minister 
    Occupation  1852  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    minister 
    Occupation  1861  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Clergyman 
    Religion  1861  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Lutheran 
    Died  29 Nov 1865  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3, 5, 6
    Hall of Fame - Waterloo Region  Bef 2012  , Waterloo Region, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    Name  F. W. Bindemann 
    Residence  820 King St. W., Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Kitchener-KingSt.W-820-FWBindeman.jpg
    Kitchener-KingSt.W-820-FWBindeman.jpg
    820 King Street West, Kitchener, Ontario - The home of Rev. F. W. Bindeman, many local couples were married here.
    Eby ID Number  Waterloo-3559 
    Buried  First Mennonite Cemetery, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Person ID  I3559  Generations
    Last Modified  14 Aug 2017 

    Family  Carolina Louisa Huber,   b. 22 May 1808, , France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Dec 1890, Buffalo, Erie, New York Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Friedrich Wilhelm "William" Bindemann,   b. 23 Sep 1838, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Jan 1873
     2. Louisa Bindemann,   b. 18 Oct 1842, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Jul 1903
    Family ID  F6184  Group Sheet

  • Photos
    Bindemann, F. W. Rev..jpg
    Bindemann, F. W. Rev..jpg

  • Notes 
    • REV. F.W. BINDEMANN
      1790-1865

      An unconventional figure, in the person of the Rev. F.W. Bindemann, came into the early religious life of Waterloo County in 1834. Rev. Bindemann, a native of Koethen, Potsdam, Prussia, was a "free-thinker" and did not hesitate to express his independent opinions. Rev. Bindemann organized the Lutherans of the area, forming several congregations, including St. Paul's Church, Berlin, in 1835. He is said to have not been "Spiritually minded," but by precept and example impressed on the people the value of the virtues of honesty and neighborliness. His interesting remarks in his written records of births, marriages and deaths were often very amusing. He was known as the "marrying preacher." He died on November 29, 1865 and was buried in the Mennonite cemetery by a Swedenborgian ministter.1a

      1aWaterloo Hall of Fame website 2006 http://www.region.waterloo.on.ca

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      Friedrich Wilhelm Bindemann 1790 - 1865

      By Sam Weicker

      Numerous articles have appeared both in our Branch Notes as well as other periodicals concerning this unusual individual. The 1989 Waterloo Historical Society Annual Volume describes the address given by Rev. Erich Scultz, Archivist of the Eastern Canada Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, and librarian at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, at the unveiling of the plaque at Trinity Lutheran Church, New Hamburg on April 17, 1989 in memory of its founder Rev. Friedrich Wilhelm Bindemann. Born July 31, 1790 in Prussia he emigrated to America in 1820 as a missionary of the Evangelical Protestant Church. He came to Berlin (Kitchener) in 1833 which was a village of 25 homes and several shops. Religious services were held in the school house located at 30 Frederick Street.

      Many of the inhabitants were Lutheran, however, Lutheran pastors were discouraged to remain because Rev. Bindemann frustrated all efforts of the people to establish a church of Lutheran faith. His doctrine of Universalism stated that all persons will be saved, or made happy, in the future state. His rugged form, traveling on horse-back, weathered every storm. His bishopric he would let no man take from him. He was a reformed preacher but independent of every synodical authority and not amenable to the discipline of any ecclesiastical body nor subject to any law except his own will, a pioneer character of great originality, he fathered a dozen congregations on this territory and ruled his loosely knit empire until its dissolution with his death in 1865.

      Rev. John Schmieder in the 25th anniversary booklet of St. Matthews Lutheran Church, Kitchener, of which he was pastor for 41 years and active pastor emeritus for 11 years, continues "During the height of his legendary career he had frustrated all efforts of the people to establish in Berlin a church of outspoken Lutheran faith. But the number of Lutherans was increasing rapidly year after year". Finally in 1862 St. Peters Lutheran Church in Berlin was organized, the first that was actually Lutheran in faith and practice.

      Congregations organized by Rev. Bindemann include Trinity, New Hamburg in 1834; St. Peters, Cambridge (Preston) in 1834 (serving until 1838); Zion, St. Agatha in 1834 (until 1840); St. Pauls, Queen St., Kitchener, in 1835 as The German United Evangelical protestant Christian Congregation in Berlin Waterloo County (until 1864); St. Johns, Waterloo in 1837 (until 1841); St. Peters, Heidelberg in 1845 and St. Matthews Conestogo in 1853. He also served congregations as far distant as Trinity, Sebastopol (Tavistock), a distance of 24 miles from Berlin. However, due to his non-Lutheran doctrine and practices congregations soon deposed him, all except St. Pauls, Kitchener.

      Rev. Bindemann died on Nov. 29, 1865. his obituary notice in the Berliner Journal of Dec. 7 included that for a long time he was the only Protestant preacher in Canada (?) who was permitted, according to the laws then in force, to perform marriages and consequently his dwelling place in Greenbush (787 King Street West, Kitchener) was thronged by young couples longing for matrimony. The plaque at Trinity New Hamburg includes

      Known as the Marrying Preacher, he was one of the few Protestant Clergy licensed to perform marriages. He probably performed more than 2,000 marriages, involving couples of all denominations. These were performed in either the English or German language.

      The address of Rev. Shultz stated that the ecumenical age is of recent times but there was an early indication of it when Rev. Bindemann died. He, a Universalist and Rationalist, posing as Lutheran, was buried by Pastor Tuerk, a Swedenborgian, in the First Mennonite Cemetery (800 King Street East, Kitchener).

      Rev. Schmieder concludes his article on Rev. Bindemann "In the East End Mennonite Cemetery there may still be seen to-day the upright marble slab which marks his grave. The upper portion of the stone shows in bas relief two inverted torches. Between them is an open bible held by a hand from below. Beneath this ornamental portion of the stone one may still decipher this simple inscription:

      Here rests Rev. Friedrich W. Bindemann / Born July 31 1790 / Died Nov. 29 1865 / Remember them which have had / The rule over you, who have / Spoken unto you the word of God. / Hebrews 31:7."

      (The top of the 24" wide, 42" high and 4" deep white marble memorial comprises three pointed arches. It is the 13th memorial west of the paved roadway midway through the cemetery, in the 15th row south in line with the First Mennonite Church, 800 King Street East, Kitchener, Ontario.2a

      2aFriedrich Wilhelm Bindemann 1790-1865; by Sam Weicker, Branch Notes, Waterloo-Wellington Branch, Ontario Genealogical Society Vol. 20 No.1

      ______________________________

      St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church
      Begun: 1835

      A congregation was formed in 1834 by the missionary Rev. Friedrich Wilhelm Bindemann. The first church, known as the German Protestant Evangelical Church, was built on the south side of Church and Queen Streets in 1848 with Rev. Bindemann as the first pastor. The name of the church was changed on Easter Monday, 1869 to St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church at Berlin, Ontario. Two years previously St. Paul's had called Rev. Adam Ernst who succeeded Rev. H.W.H. Wichmann. Pastor Ernst's conditions to the congregation when accepting its call were that 1) the congregation join the Missouri Synod and 2) the church's name be changed. In the fall of 1871 the congregation made the decision to affiliate with the Eastern District, Missouri Synod. Pastor Ernst was followed by Rev. Peter Andres, from 1881-1894.

      A decision was made to build a new church and the last service in the old church was held on March 10, 1889. The next day the tearing down of the old building began. Work then began on lowering the hill on which the church had stood, before construction could begin on the new building. The cornerstone for the new church was laid on June 2, 1889 and the service of dedication was held on December 8, 1889. Of interest is the fact that the benches from the old church were retained for use in the new one.3a

      3aWaterloo County Churches A Research Guide To Churches Established Before 1900 By Rosemary Ambrose

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      St. Peter's Evangelical Lutheran Church
      Begun: 1862

      A Sunday School, made up of members of St. Paul's who were unhappy with the pastor, Rev. F.W. Bindemann, was organized on November 2, 1862 by the Rev. C.F.A. Kaessmann of the Canada Synod. The formal organization of the congregation was on January 1, 1863, and on January 19, 1863 a decision was made to build a church. One quarter of an acre of land was purchased from Augusta Krug (for $178.50). The cornerstone was laid by the pastor, Rev. Kaessmann, on April 26, 1863, and on July 19th of the same year the new church was dedicated. Rev. J. Fishbein, president of the Canada Synod, presided at the dedication service.

      Plans were made in 1877 to build a newer church. The last service was held on March 11, 1877 in the old church and demolition of the building began the next day. The newer and larger building on the same site was dedicated on October 6, 1878. The first English service was held on May 10, 1884. A decision was made on May 12, 1912 to conduct English language services on Sunday evenings, and in the next year an English Sunday School was begun.

      Construction of another new church building began in 1965 - once again on the same site. Phase I saw construction of a new sanctuary beside the old church. The last service was held in the old church on September 4, 1966 and the first one in the new sanctuary a week later, on September 11, 1966. Phase II of the project began the next day with the demolition of the old church. Dedication Sunday for the new church complex was on October 20, 1968.

      St. Peter's is reported to have been an independent congregation until joining the Canada Synod in 1914. Early pastors who followed Rev. Kaessmann were Revs. Herman Sagehorn (1870-1877), G. Manz (1877-1881), Thomas Snyder (1881) and R. von Pirch (1882-1905). Of interest: St. Matthew's Lutheran Church was formed from St. Peter's Church on February 23, 1904..4a

      4aWaterloo County Churches A Research Guide To Churches Established Before 1900 By Rosemary Ambrose

      ______________________________

      St. Peter's Evangelical Lutheran Church

      The congregation was organized on December 1, 1834 by the Rev. F.W. Bindemann (1834-1838). Worship services were held in homes and barns until the Lutheran Rudel brothers erected a stone building for this purpose at the corner of what is now Queenston Road and Montrose Street. The premises were also made available to other congregations when they were first established in Preston. Land for a Lutheran church was purchased in 1837 and a frame church was built in 1839 on King Street on the site of the present St. Peter's. This fifty foot by forty foot church with its sixty foot tower was Preston's first church, called Christ Church, and was free for the use of all denominations. The building was used until replaced by the present-day stone church. The cornerstone for the new church was laid on August 21, 1887. The old frame church had been relocated before then to a lot on the corner of Queen and Church Streets where the congregation worshipped until the new stone church was ready for consecration in 1889. Weekly evening services in the English language began at that time.

      A new parsonage was built in 1913 on land behind the church, and renovations and improvements have been made to the interior of the church over the years. A new Christian Education wing was built in 1957 (cornerstone: January 27, 1957) and dedicated in 1958. Pastors who followed F.W. Bindemann were Revs. J. Huettner (1838-1849) who was the first regular pastor, F. Hildebrandt (1849-1850), Jacob Hoelsche (1850-1854), and Rev. Immanuel Wurster who served the congregation from 1854-1881. Rev. Wurster also ministered to St. James Evangelical Lutheran Church in Hespeler.5a

      5aWaterloo County Churches A Research Guide To Churches Established Before 1900 By Rosemary Ambrose

      ___________________________________

      St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church

      The congregation was founded in 1837 by Rev. F.W. Bindemann, pastor of St. Paul's Lutheran Church, Kitchener; early services were held in homes or other suitable meeting places. Property for the first church building was purchased from Jacob C. Snider for 5 shillings (approximately $1.25). The cornerstone was laid in the spring of 1838 and dedication services in the new church at 72 King Street North in Waterloo were held in the fall of the same year. Rev. Bindemann was pastor. He was replaced in 1841 by Rev. Jacob Huettner of Preston who then ministered to both congregations. When the church's first membership list was compiled on October 24, 1841, the congregation numbered sixteen persons.

      The frame church was destroyed by fire and replaced by a new, larger one in 1883. This, too, was destroyed by fire - on October 31, 1959. The congregation then built a new stone church at a new location on Willow Street, with dedication taking place on October 14, 1962.

      Early pastors except for Rev. Bindemann (1837-1841), who was asked to resign in 1841, were Revs. J. Huettner (1841-1849), F.A. Peifer, Immanuel Wurster (1851-1855), and Jacob Hoelsche who began his ministry in 1855. Rev. Wurster ministered to St. Peter's Lutheran Church in Preston jointly with St. John's for one year until assuming charge of only Preston in 1855.6a

      6aWaterloo County Churches A Research Guide To Churches Established Before 1900 By Rosemary Ambrose

      _____________________________


      Rev. Frederick William Bindemann, who organized the first German Lutheran Church in Waterloo County in the Village of Waterloo in 1837, was known as the marrying parson. Not only did he unite in the German language, German couples, many of them coming long distances, but his fame led a great many English speaking brides and grooms to seek his services as well. It is said that in the more than thirty years of his pastorate in Waterloo and Kitchener, which extended from 1833 to the time of his death in 1865, his record of marriage ceremonies ran into large figures, probably a couple of thousand or more.

      Among those who were united by him were: Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Hughes and Mr. and Mrs. Walter Wells, of Waterloo; and Mr. and Mrs. Hugo Kranz and Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Rittinger of Kitchener; this was in the 50's.

      The frame residence he occupied for many years, may still be seen on King Street West, Kitchener, in Carmel Church grounds, and almost opposite the entrance to Green Street. Its original location was farther east, near the present Schnarr greenhouse.

      And Father Bindemann as he was called, was a sympathetic soul, and on one occasion at least he lent his aid to a run-away couple when the would-be bride's father gave the eloping couple such a hot chase to prevent the ceremony, that they had hardly entered the pastor's house when the irate father appeared.

      Father Bindemann was equal to the occasion, and standing before the excited and panting couple, he had only time to say in a loud voice, as the father entered the door. "Amen". "Ja. sie sind zu spaet, (yes, you are too late)," he informed the father. "but for your satisfaction I shall marry them over again". And then he proceeded with the ceremony while the bride's daddy, looking on and somewhat dazed by the rapid turn of affair, hardly knew what to think7a

      7aA Historical Sketch of the Town of Waterloo, Waterloo Historical Society's Annual Report, 1928

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      THE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN ST. PAUL'S CHURCH

      Within ten years Berlin obtained four more churches. One of these was founded by Pastor F. W. Bindemann of Coethan. Prussia. After serving in the army, he studied Theology and was sent to Hanover, Pa., as a Reformed Church missionary. He came here in 1834 and built a home in the Greenbush, opposite the Collegiate. While he was affable and honest, his teachings were of a rationalisic order. He organized a half-dozen congregations, including Berlin (1835), Waterloo (1837), and Preston, and ruled them like a bishopric. The Berlin body was called, "The German Protestant Evangelical Church."

      Pastor Bindemann kept his cluster of churches together until a further freshet of immigration set in. More Lutherans came in and wanted Lutheran ministers. Preston broke off in 1838 and Waterloo in 1841. Berlin, however, was his citadel until his death. The local congregation erected a frame church in South Queen Street in 1835 and replaced it with a fair-sized brick church in 1864. During his pastorate, the Rev. Bindemann is said to have united 2,000 couples in marriage, numbers of whom were young Mennonites, who were not yet church members.

      He rode from place to place on a white horse and often cantered over to Bridgeport. At Bridgeport there was a merchant named Tagge who had just been made a magistrate and who was puffed up. One afternoon, on seeing Mr. Bindemann riding in, he said to several customers at his store-door, "Stay, and we'll have some fun with the preacher." When the rider reached the store, Tagge droned, "How is it, Pastor, that you must have a grand white horse when our Saviour was content to ride about on a humble ass?" The response came forth, "We can't do that anymore, for all the asses have been made magistrates,"

      Pastor Bindemann died in 1865 and was buried in the First Mennonite Church cemetery. Of him the Rev. John Schmieder wrote in 1929,
      Though body long become dust and ashes, Bindemann still a name to conjure with. and his romantic is remembered today even by those who never saw still him face to face. The legendary white horse and its rider, wrapped round with a great shawl against the elements, still haunts the memory of Berlin's aged citizens; and his words are even now repeated by their children; while his influence is still potent in all the territory he traversed.

      The Course Since Followed

      After Mr. Bindemann's death the congregation engaged the Rev. Wm. Helfer. He proved unfaithful to his trust, both in con-nection with his teachings and mode of living. The congregation then advertised in a Buffalo newspaper for a Lutheran minister, and as a result the Rev. P. H. Leutsinger was appointed pastor.8a

      8aThe History of Kitchener

  • Sources 
    1. [S131] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo Twp. - 1851, Div 3 pg 45.
      Fredk. BINDEMANMinisterPrussiaLU62
      Carolina BINDEMANWifeFranceLU44
      William BINDEMANSonCanadaLU14
      Louisa BINDEMANDaughterCanadaLU10

    2. [S47] Cemetery - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - First Mennonite CC#4507 Internet link First Mennonite Cemetery online.
      (eroded) Hier Ruhet / ? Fried. W. Bindemann / geboren 31 Juli 1790 / gestorben 29 Nov.1865

    3. [S7] News - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Berliner Journal (1859-1917), 7 Dec 1865.
      (Rev) Friederich Wilhelm Bindemann died 29 Nov 1865 in Berlin, 75 yrs, 3 mths., 29 days

    4. [S123] Census - ON, Waterloo, Berlin - 1861, Div. 2 Page 20.

    5. [S2] Church Records - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Church of the New Jerusalem (Swedenborgian).
      Pastor Fr. Wm. Bindemann, d. 29 Nov 1865, aged 72y 4m. Predigt im Hause

    6. [S31] News - ON, Waterloo, Cambridge - Dumfries Reformer (1850-1892), 6 Dec 1865.
      Bindemann, F.W. [Rev.] died 29 Nov 1865 At Berlin. Age 75 years 3 months 29 days.

    7. [S2070] Directory - Ontario Directory for 1851.

    8. [S131] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo Twp. - 1851, Div 3 pg 45.

    9. [S220] Waterloo Region Hall of Fame Waterloo Region Hall of Fame.

  • Event Map
    Event
    Link to Google MapsReligion - German Protestant Evangelical - 1834 - German Protestant Evangelical Church, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Lutheran Minister - 1851 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - minister - 1852 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Clergyman - 1861 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsReligion - Lutheran - 1861 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 29 Nov 1865 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsHall of Fame - Waterloo Region - Bef 2012 - , Waterloo Region, Ontario Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - - 820 King St. W., Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - First Mennonite Cemetery, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth