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James S. Cowan, MP 

James S. Cowan, MP[1]

Male 1803 - 1900

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  • Suffix  MP 
    Birth  3 Nov 1803  Henderland, Megetdale, Peebles, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3, 4, 5
    Christened  Lyne and Megget, Peebles, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Gender  Male 
    Public Service  1842  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Councillor - Waterloo Township 
    Occupation  1855  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    Occupation  1871  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Farmer 
    Religion  1871  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    C. Presbyterian 
    Occupation  1881  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Farmer 
    Religion  1881  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Presbyterian C. 
    Died  22 May 1900  Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Hall of Fame - Waterloo Region  Bef 2012  , Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    • James Cowan, a farmer from Cramilt, in the Lowlands of Scotland, settled in Waterloo Township in August 1834, and became one of the County's most distinguished agricultural authorities. From the 1860s to the 1880s his farm "Clochmhor" was well-known for its sales of purebred Leicester sheep and Shorthorn cattle.

      Cowan was the first vice-president of the Agricultural Society of Waterloo County when it was founded in 1853 and was the first president when it became the South Waterloo Agricultural Society.

      He was a representative of Waterloo Township on the District Council of Wellington from 1842-1849.

      In 1853 he bought an interest in Lutz, Cook and Company, of Galt, manufacturers of woodworking machinery, which eventually became Cowan and Company in 1879.

      Cowan served as a Reform member of Parliament for South Waterloo from 1861 to 1867 and was a member of the Federal Board of Official Arbitrators from 1869 to 1888

      Past and Present Inductees. (2017). Waterlooregionmuseum.ca. Retrieved 25 June 2017, from http://www.waterlooregionmuseum.ca/en/exhibits/past-and-present-inductees.aspx
    Land  Waterloo Township - Beasley's Lower Block Conc. 1 Lot 02, Waterloo County, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Eby ID Number  Waterloo-63789 
    Buried  Mount View Cemetery, Cambridge, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Person ID  I63789  Generations
    Last Modified  6 Nov 2018 

    Father  Thomas Cowan,   b. 1770, Of, Moffat, , Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1833, Moffat, , Dumfries, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother  Elizabeth "Betty" Hastie,   b. 1782, Of, Moffat, , Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Mar 1868, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID  F31446  Group Sheet

    Family  Helen Laing,   b. 26 Feb 1811, Moffat, , Dumfries, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1892, Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Cowan
     2. Thomas Cowan,   b. 14 Aug 1835, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Oct 1898, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. Isabella Cowan,   b. 1836, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1876, South Dumfries Twp., Brant Co., Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. Elizabeth Cowan,   b. 1839, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Feb 1845
     5. William Cowan,   b. 16 May 1841, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Dec 1922, Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location
     6. Margaret Cowan,   b. 29 Jun 1843, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Oct 1928
     7. Lt. Col. James Laing Cowan,   b. 4 Feb 1847, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Sep 1936
     8. Arthur Burnett Cowan,   b. 8 Aug 1848, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Jan 1922
    Family ID  F16658  Group Sheet

  • Photos
    James Cowan
    James Cowan
    James S. Cowan
    James S. Cowan
    From 1897 Jubilee Souvenir of Galt
    James S. Cowan
    James S. Cowan
    From 1897 Jubilee Souvenir of Galt

  • Notes 
    • James Cowan, ex-Dominion Arbitrator, died at his residence, "Craigie Lea" 2:30p.m. yesterday, in the 98th year of his age. He was a member of the old Parliament of Canada before confederation, but was defeated by Hon. James Young in the Conferation election of 1867. Deceased was born near the Vale of Yarrow 1803 and has been a resident of the vicinity since 1834. The late Thomas Cowan, postmaster at Galt, was son of the deceased. The surviving members of the family are J. Lang Cowan, residing at "Clochmor" the farm homestead near Galt; William Cowan and A. B. Cowan of Cowan & Co., and Miss Cowan,at "Craigie Lea".

      Berlin News Record, May 23, 1900

      ______________________________


      James Cowan, ex-Dominion arbitrator, died on Tuesday afternoon at his residence, "Craigie Lea" Galt, aged 97 years. for the last few days he had been lying in a semi-unconscious state, taking almost no nourishment and he departed this life peacefully and as one falls asleep. Born near the famous Vale of Yarrow in 1803, He spent boyhood there and came to Canada in 1834. He lived in Galt and neighborhood ever since and was one of the most prominent men of his day. The funeral procession will leave "Craigie Lea" at 1:30 o'clock Thursday afternoon May 24th and the body will be taken in Knox Church, where a funeral service will be held beginning at 2 o'clock. Interment will afterwards be made in Mount View Cemetery.

      Waterloo Chronicle-Telegraph, Thursday, May 31, 1900 Page 3


      ___________________________________


      The death on Tuesday afternoon of Mr. James Cowan, ex-M.P., at his residence, Craigle Lea, in his 97th year, closed the life of an illustrious Canadian Scotchman. Up to a few months ago, Mr. Cowan's health was so good as never to occasion any anxiety, and his brave heart, his buoyant temperament and his fine courage were a source of inspiration and comfort to family and friends alike. But the natural decline of his physical forces having once in reality se in there was not stay but a steady, gradual disintegration until the spirit slipped peaceful away. He lived calmly and courageously and he died so, enjoying throughout his life, publicly and privately, in a very special degree, the positive affection and esteem and confidence of all who knew him. the date of the funeral has been changed from Thursday to Friday afternoon, at 1:30 o'clock, when the cortege will leave the family residence and proceed to Knox Church, into which edifice the body will be taken and a service will be conducted by the Rev. R. E. Knowles, B.A., beginning at two o'clock. The remains will then be exposed to view, and afterwards will be laid to rest in Mount View Cemetery in the family plot.

      The late James Cowan's career was one of exceeding interest. Born near Moffatt in the Vale of Yarrow, Peebleshire, Scotland, on the third of November 1803, his early life was thrown amidst the surroundings and traditions of that classic river, the beauties of which have been sung in verse by Sir Walter Scott, Hogg and Wordsworth. He received the rudiments of an education at the parochial school of his neighborhood, but it was necessarily limited and crude. The thirst for knowledge was, however, implanted in his there, and by properly employing his time when a shepherd and driving the flocks to green pasture fields in the vale, he managed to acquire an extensive knowledge of the various subjects which the times placed within his reach. He usually carried a book in his plaid and studied it during the periods of inactivity that frequently fell to his lot while watching the flocks. It was not long before he had qualified himself and became schoolmaster of a parochial school. The opening years of the century were marked, as the opening years of nearly every century have been marked, by sanguinary foreign wars on the part of Britain, and James Cowan was twelve years of age when the battle of Waterloo was fought and ever recalled the occasion vividly. The people gathered day by day in crowds round the post office at Moffatt for the news which the coach brought in. It carried flags when there was another victory over Buonaparte and it was a memorable day when from the coach fluttered the white flags of peace. That the claims of practical patriotism had been listened to then as now is apparent in the fact that the young lad ate his porridge from a bowl upon which the inspiring word, "Trafalgar," was stamped. The peaceful Yarrow flowed by the great Ettrick forest, and in the quiet solitude of the country Mr. Cowan reflected on religious themes; and the religious impressions which he received then, though subjected to some vicissitudes afterwards, never forsook him they gradually assumed more of the fixedness of habit and became purified from whatever ally may at first have mingled with them. Here was the commencement of that Christian character which subsequently appeared in so mature and lovely a form. Mr. Cowan continued to reside in his native place until 1834, in May of which year he married Ellen Laing (who died only about ten years ago) and immediately emigrated to Canada, coming direct to Galt. He was then a tall, typical athletic Scotchman of thirty-one years. On his arrival he found that cholera had been ravaging the new settlement and that one out of every five of the inhabitants had been carried off by the scourge. A deep and solemn sadness hung over the community. Mr. Cowan, however, had no intention of becoming allied to town life. He preferred the open country and having decided to take upon farming bought from Squire Scollick - a prominent man at the time and Colonel of the Ninth Bore Militia - 350 acres of fine land, which he named "Clochmohr", after a hill in the Vale of Meggat, where , where he tended his flocks. This farm in now occupied by his son, Lt.-Col. J. Laing Cowan, and to it has since been added some 200 acres. As a farmer, from the first, Mr. Cowan was far and away above the average for intelligence, system and industry, a man who got up early and worked late. He outlined a system of farming that was quite new in this country, and was the first man to grow a ten-acre field of potatoes in this part of the country, for in those days a quarter-acre potato field was considered big. He teamed his potatoes to Hamilton and sold them there. At twenty-five cents a bushel they were one of the best paying crops that could be raised. He was the first man, also, to import improved breeds of sheep, such as Leicesters, Shropshires and Cheviots, from the Old Country, and for many years farmers from all over the country came to get breeding sheep from him. He was also the first man to import Shorthorn cattle and made a great success of it and considerable money. In addition he had in every sense of the term, an up-to-date farm. Young Scotchmen and Englishmen coming to this country to learn farming always endeavored to get a place at Clochmohr, knowing Mr. Cowan's methods were thorough and practical and quite a number of the best class of young men received instructions in agriculture there.

      By was of parenthesis, it might be stated that unlike those around him and the custom of the time, Mr. Cowan was a man who would never run 'store bills'. He paid cash for everything. Very few thought of settling their financial obligation at the the store more than once a year. Credit and whiskey were the curse of the country. Illustrating Mr. Cowan's principles on this point, a merchant with whom Mr. Cowan dealt for many years, told the writer some time ago that on one occasion Mr. Cowan had got through making purchases in the narrator's store, having traded produce, and was going away when he suddenly remembered that he needed a new hat. He had no money left and although the need for the hat was pressing and the merchant offered to let him have one and pay for it again, he stoutly refused, saying,'Na, na, I'll gang without my hat and gang bareheld rather than run credit,' Mr. Cowan continued to reside on the farm until about fourteen years ago when he retired to Galt, buying his present residence and grounds, 'Craigie Lea' from Andrew Elliott, ........native man of the town's early years, who had also come to Galt in 1834 and carried on a grocery business on Main street.

      But Mr. Cowan was not only a successful farmer. In the early fifties he identified himself with local manufacturing interests by becoming a member of the agricultural implement manufacturing firm of Lutz & Cook. Peter Cook was subsequently killed in the foundry and Mr. Lutz and Mr. Cowan carried on the business till it was sold to Cameron & Co., but in the deal Mr. Cowan retained an interest in the business. Finally Cameron died, the other partners dropped out and the foundry adopted its present name, Cowan & Co., the deceased being the senior member of the firm till his death, although he never took an active interest in the establishment, leaving its affairs largely in the hands of his sons, Arthur, Thos., and William.

      In politics, Mr. Cowan figured conspicuously in Canadian affairs. His name became known from one end of Canada to the other. In the early years of political struggle here he avowed his belief in the principles of the Reform party. In 1858 he ran against George Alexander of the representation of the Gore District in the Upper House, but was defeated. In 1860 he was put up by the Reformers of South Waterloo against Jacob Hespeler and was elected. He then took his seat in the old Parliament at Quebec. In the following election, 1863, he was again elected for South Waterloo, defeating William Robinson by a majority of 64. the majority would undoubtedly have been much larger had Mr. Cowan not been leaning slightly toward the policy of the Conservative party and many distrusted his full allegiance to the platform of his avowed faith. At that time the agitation for the confederation of the Provinces was in full swing, and being a man of broad national outlook and buoyant optimism in his country's future it was but what those who knew him best expected when he pronounced himself, shortly after this election, in sympathy with the views of Sir John Macdonald in the question of consolidating the interest of the country by uniting the various Provinces in a bond of common citizenship. He then and there became a Conservative and continued a member of that party till his decease. In 1867 he was nominated by South Waterloo Conservatives but was defeated by James Young.

      A year or two afterwards, Mr. Cowan was appointed a member of the Dominion Board of Arbitrators, whose capacity it was to hear and adjudicated upon all claims for compensation through the construction of public works, railways and canals. He continued to be a member of that Board fro about twenty-five years, when it was submerged into the Court of Exchequer and its career was ended. He was then appointed Dominion Referee. There were four on the Board of Arbitration, the last surviving member of which is now Henry Muma of Drumbo, who is over eighty years of age. In this capacity Mr. Cowan obtained a wide experience of general public affairs. He was for years chairman of the Board, and travelled from Winnipeg in the west to Halifax in the east hearing cases. He settled more than fifteen hundred in one year, in the aggregate millions of dollars changing hands, along the line of the Intercolonial Railway, some of which were so important that over $100,000 were involved in each settlement. Many encomiums as to high-minded and fair dispensation of justice have been passed upon him by men high in public position, notable among whom was Sir Alexander Mackenzie, who on one occasion stated that there was not a man in the civil service that would put himself about more to deal even-handed justice between Government and people than James Cowan. Mr. Cowan's physical and mental qualifications were sufficiently strong to permit him to retain the position of Dominion Referee until over ninety years of age, when he was superannuated. It has been said of Mr. Cowan that he could not do wrong or injustice to human being.

      Mr. Cowan figured in the religious realm as conspicuously as in business or politics. Religion was to him not a thing of a day, but a matter of the heart and life. From early youth he kept a close diary of his religious experiences, and the pages of that book breath the yearning he felt after the light and truth that flow from the throne of God. To know and do the will of God was his conception of a true life and the rule of his daily existence. In early life he was a member of the Church of Scotland, but at the time of the Disruption, in 1834, he came out of that Church, and along with the Rev. Dr. Bayne, "the father of Presbyterianism in Canada," took an active interest in the formation of Knox church congregation here. He was a member of the old Trustee Board till 1855, when he was made a member of Session and a few years afterwards Session clerk, which office he held till his death, although of late years he has had the services of an assistant. From the time that the church property was bought in 1843, until his death he was one of three gentlemen who held that property in trust.

      The late Mr. Cowan as a splendid type of the best class of Scottish character. Essentially, his nature was religious. From his earliest days, the sense of the unseen and eternal was a potent influence in his life. A diary chiefly of his religious life, which he left behind him, and .........alluded to, abounds in comments upon the preachers and preaching of the day, and in analysis of his won heart and life. Throughout all his public and parliamentary career, he was never too busy for the careful observance of his private religious exercises. While his theology was of the stern Calvinistic type, it was nevertheless marked by the greatest evangelical fervor, and he was wont to say that of all happy experiences, he regarded with greatest pleasure that of the great revival in Galt about thirty-one years ago. In moral character Mr. Cowan was strong and lofty. His sense of honor was high and keen; his austere and uncompromising attitude toward wrong-doing of any kind was tempered by a nature of which tenderness was a prominent characteristic. His intellectual powers were of a high order, especially developed were they along the line of literature. Few men in Canada, of any rank, were the masters of more terse and trenchant English than that which couched the thoughts of our departed friend. This was due not only to his long public service and his training in public speech, but even more to his life-long familiarity with some of the best writers in the world of English letters. His was the mastery which comes to "the man of the one book". From the earliest days of youth his mind was steeped in the thought of Boston, Baxter and Rutherford, but especially Phillip Doddridge, whose "Rise and progress of Religion in the Soul" was blessed to his conversion in early life, and this same treasured work conned over and over till almost known by heart, was still upon his table when the shadows of night began to come down upon the aged life. To the very end Mr. Cowan was a reader. The heaviest literature was never neglected, for his interest in current events, and especially in the present war, never waned; yet the major portion of his time was given to the perusal of a few strong and thoughtful works which ever lay within reach of his hand. One of the last books he made his own was Alexander Whyte's "Bunyan Characters." Taking him for all in all, it shall be long before we look upon his like again. In him were well united a giant's frame, a strong and unbending will, an almost Puritanic conscience, a deep and unshaken trust in God, from which were sprung the reverence for the Sabbath that all who knew him knew so well, the devotion to the Church of God, which can never be forgotten by the lovers of the Presbyterian Zion, and that unflinching loyalty to duty which marked his work, alike upon the heathery Scottish hills, where roamed the sheep entrusted to his boyish care, and upon the bench whereon he sat as an untitled judge to adjust the differences of conflicting claims. Add to all this a superior mental endowment, a charitable heart, a courtly manner, and it is not difficult to understand why in life he should have been so esteemed and influential, or why in death his stately life, should be so widely honored, and its withdrawal lamented by all who felt his power.

      With so many friends the following members of the family are left to mourn his loss: William, James L. and Arthur B. Cowan, and Miss Margaret Cowan. Two are dean Mr. James Deans, in 1876, and Thomas, late postmaster here, in 1898.3a

      3aGalt Reporter May 24, 1900.

      __________________________________

      The men who took the most prominent part in organizing the first library in the village were: Rev. Dr. Bayne, Alexander Burnet, James Cowan, John Gowinlock, William Trotter, H. G. Barlow, James Harris, Andrew Elliott, Francis McElroy, Francis Hogg, Andrew Moscrip and Walter H. Benn. These men have long since passed away, but they all did good work in their day in laying the foundations of a progressive and moral community; to the older generation of Galtonians their names call up a crowd of memories of the days that are no more. 4a

      4a First Annual Report of the Waterloo Historical Society, Berlin 1913, pg 17

      ____________________

      James Cowan died in his residence in Galt the Tuesday afternoon before last at the advanced age of 97 years. He came to Canada in 1834 and has since then, resided first on a farm near Galt, and, after he retired from farming, in the town itself. In the year 1861, he was elected Liberal member for South Waterloo in the old Canadian Parliament and defeated thereby the Conservative candidate, Jakob Hespeler. In the parliamentary election of 1867, Mr. Cowan was defeated by the Honourable Jas. Young. Since his departure from parliament, he has held the position of judge in the Court of Arbitration for the Dominion Government.5a

      5aBerliner Journal 31 May 1900 Translated by: Patricia J. Kauk for the Kitchener Public Library

      ______________________

      James Cowan, a farmer from Cramilt, in the Lowlands of Scotland, settled in Waterloo Township in August 1834, and became one of the County's most distinguished agricultural authorities. From the 1860s to the 1880s his farm "Clochmhor" was well-known for its sales of purebred Leicester sheep and Shorthorn cattle.

      Cowan was the first vice-president of the Agricultural Society of Waterloo County when it was founded in 1853 and was the first president when it became the South Waterloo Agricultural Society.

      He was a representative of Waterloo Township on the District Council of Wellington from 1842-1849.

      In 1853 he bought an interest in Lutz, Cook and Company, of Galt, manufacturers of woodworking machinery, which eventually became Cowan and Company in 1879.

      Cowan served as a Reform member of Parliament for South Waterloo from 1861 to 1867 and was a member of the Federal Board of Official Arbitrators from 1869 to 1888.6a

      6aThe Waterloo Region Hall of Fame

      ______________________

      Galt Foundry and Machine Works

      This firm is conducted under the name of Cowan & Co. the members of the firm are William Cowan and Arthur B. Cowan. The business is an old one, having been established in 1842, the present proprietors taking possession in 1871. They have added largely to the plant, which greatly increases their facilities for carrying on business, and ever since the phenomenal growth of business keeps further taxing their resources. The firm is popularly known as iron workers and manufacturers of the most improved woodworking machinery, Harris Corliss and Slide Valve engines, boilers and sole manufacturers in Canada of the celebrated Austin patent feed water heater, lime, mud and oil extractor, and condensor, combined heaters, etc.

      The main factory and buildings are the property of the company, and are substantially built structures of stone, two stories high and occupying an entire block of frontage on North Water Street. The working force consists of over one hundred hands, the greater portion of whom are skilled mechanics, in receipt of good wages, as may be judged from the pay roll of the firm, aggregating over forty thousand dollars annually. This large sum distributed, as it is, among the merchants means a great impetus to local trade, so it can easily be understood that the firm of factors in the prosperity of Galt. The trade of the firm extends not only over the whole of the Dominion of Canada, but their products find their way to many foreign countries, and while this is, of course, a source of profit to the firm, it also demonstrates conclusively that Canadian manufacturers are not inferior to any, and are fully capable of taking a front rank in the markets of the world.

      Some idea may be formed by outsiders of the immensity of the operations of this firm, when we state that its yearly output is valued at one hundred and forty thousand dollars. James Cowan, Sr., formerly the senior partner of the firm, is a native of Scotland, but who is a pioneer of Galt, becoming an active and worthy citizen in 1834. Ever since, until old age unfitted him for life's activities, though even in his advanced years, still he manifests an interest in Galt. The other members of the firm are not only Canadian but natives of the town, of which they have done much to build up and develop, and they have ever been foremost in the ranks of progressive citizens7a

      7aJubilee Souvenir of Galt 1897


  • Sources 
    1. [S116] Vit - ON - Death Registration.
      William Cowan b. 16 May 1841 Waterloo Township, s/o James Cowan (b. Scotland) & Ellen Lang (b. Scotland) informant Robert Cowan (Hespeler, son) cause: old age, myocarditis & pleurisy

    2. [S122] Cemetery - ON, Waterloo, Cambridge - Mount View CC#4495 Internet Link .
      In/ memory of/ James Cowan/ born at Henderland/ Megetdale Scotland/ November 3rd 1803/ died at Galt/ May 22nd 1900/ Helen Laing/ wife of/ James Cowan/ died at Galt A.D. 1892 / aged 80 years/ also their children/ Elizabeth/ died at Waterloo A.D. 1845/ aged 5 years/ Isabella Deans/ died in South Dumfries A.D. 1876/ aged 39 years/ Thomas Cowan/ their eldest son/ born at Clochmohr Waterloo T'p./ Aug. 14th 1835/ died there October 14th 1898/ Arthur Burnet Cowan/ died Jan. 5, 1922 in his 75th year/ Margaret Cowan/ died Oct. 12, 1928 in her 86th year,

    3. [S604] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo South - 1871, Div. 2, Pg. 6.

    4. [S178] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo South - 1881, Waterloo S. Twp. 1881 Div 2 Page 2.

    5. [S1609] Scotland Births and Baptisms, 1564-1950, James Cowan, 02 Nov 1803; citing , Lyne And Megget, Peebles, Scotland, reference 2:187KBR4; FHL microfilm 1,067,918..
      James Cowan
      GenderMale
      Christening Place, LYNE AND MEGGET, PEEBLES, SCOTLAND
      Birth Date02 Nov 1803
      Birthplace, Lyne And Megget, Peebles, Scotland
      Father's NameThomas Cowan
      Mother's NameElisabeth Hastie

    6. [S1449] Book - Grassroots Government Biographies of Waterloo Township Councillors.

    7. [S266] Funeral Card - - Funeral Card Notices of Waterloo County Volume 2.
      Died, On Saturday morning, November 17th, Isabella Laing, of Waterloo, aged 78 years. Funeral: Monday, at Two o'clock, from the residence of Mr. James Cowan, Waterloo. November 17, 1855.

    8. [S220] Waterloo Region Hall of Fame Waterloo Region Hall of Fame.

  • Event Map
    Event
    Link to Google MapsChristened - - Lyne and Megget, Peebles, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsPublic Service - Councillor - Waterloo Township - 1842 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - 1855 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Farmer - 1871 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsReligion - C. Presbyterian - 1871 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Farmer - 1881 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsReligion - Presbyterian C. - 1881 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 22 May 1900 - Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsHall of Fame - Waterloo Region - Bef 2012 - , Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLand - - Waterloo Township - Beasley's Lower Block Conc. 1 Lot 02, Waterloo County, Ontario Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Mount View Cemetery, Cambridge, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth