Waterloo Region Generations
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Margaret "Maggie" McNaught
Female 1837 - 1927


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  • Birth  18 Dec 1837  , Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5
    Gender  Female 
    Immigration  1841  Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Immigration  1841  , Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Residence  1858  Brantford, Brant Co., Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Religion  1861  Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    United Presbyterian Church 
    Religion  1871  Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    U. Presbyterian 
    Recipes  1898  Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • ASPARAGUS SOUP

      A piece of beef or mutton; a quantity of fresh asparagus; a few slices of toast. Make in the usual way a nice rich soup of beef or mutton seasoned with salt and pepper After it has been well boiled and skimmed and he meat is all to pieces, strain the soup into another pot (or wash out the same one) and return the liquid. Have ready a quantity of fresh asparagus with the stalks cut off close to the green tops; it should have been lying in cold water all the time the meat was boiling. Put into the soup half the asparagus tops and boil them in it till entirely dissolved, then add the remaining asparagus to the soup (having previously boiled them in a pan by themselves until they are tender but not broken). Give the whole a boil together. Make some nice slices of toast with the crust cut off dip them a minute in hot water. Butter them and lay at the bottom of the tureen and pour the soup upon them. This is nice soup for company.

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      BROILED CALF'S LIVER AND BACON

      A calf's liver (or lamb's) cut in thin slices, well blanched and daintily broiled, is a delicious breakfast dish, garnished with a few crisp slices of bacon. Choose a fine large liver, have it cut in slices not more than half an inch in thickness. Lay these pieces in cold water to blanch, for at least fifteen minutes. At the end of this time drain each piece of liver, dry it with a dish-towel, dip it in melted butter after seasoning it with salt and pepper, and dust it with flour. Broil it en minutes over a clear fire, being careful not to allow it to become charred on the surface. Turn the liver on a hot platter as soon as it is done, and in a hot iron frying pan or spider lay as many pieces of bacon as there are slices of liver. The bacon must be firm and ice-cold and cut in slices as thin as possible, so that it will crisp into little rolls as soon as it is tossed for a moment into the heated spider. Do not allow it to become hard, but take it up as soon as it is done. Lay a slice of bacon on each slice of liver, or put the bacon in a border around the platter containing the broiled liver. It can be fired as well as broiled. The bacon cooked first, and the liver in the bacon gravy.

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      COLD SALMON PICKLED.

      Take the fish left from dinner, remove the bones and lay in a dish. Boil a breakfast cup of the liquor in which the fish was boiled with same quantity of vinegar. Half an ounce of whole pepper, half an ounce of allspice, one teaspoonful salt and a bay leaf. Let stand till cold and pour over the fish. Allow to remain ten hours before using. A very nice breakfast dish.

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      FINNAN HADDIE.

      Take a haddock, put in a baking pan with the skin down, and pour in enough warm water just to cover the skin and not the rest of the fish. Let the fish remain in the oven fifteen minutes. By this time the skin should be loosened. Take the fish out of the oven, pull off the skin, and pour the water out of the baking pan. Lay the fish back in the pan with milk enough over it to cover it, and strew bits of butter over it. When it is brown serve it for breakfast, or if you have sweet cream, instead of using butter take a coffee cup of cream and then thicken with a little flour, about a spoonful. (Mix your flour with a little cold cream first.) Boil it up and have it ready to pour over your fish when it is cooked.

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      FRESH SALMON FRIED.

      Cut the slices three-fourths of an inch thick, dredge with flour, or dip them in eggs and crumbs, fry a light brown. This mode will do for all fish cut into steaks. Season with salt and pepper.

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      JELLIED CHICKEN.

      A fowl, four pig's feet or a shank of veal, salt and pepper. Take a fowl, an old one is best; put on with water enough to cover, add salt and pepper; cook until tender, take out the bones and lay the pieces in a mould, take your pig's feet, which have been cleaned and soaked, boil them to a jelly, strain off and put with the liquor from the chicken, boil it down, skimming well until only enough remains to cover your chicken well. Salt and pepper to taste.

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      SCOTCH BROTH.

      A shank of beef, a half cup barley, two slices onion, half a cabbage, three carrots, one head of celery, a little parsley, pepper and salt. Cover the beef with cold water, add barley, onions, and skim well when coming to the boil. Two hours before serving, add the vegetables all chopped fine. Skim the fat from the broth before serving; add pepper and salt to taste. This soup requires four hours to boil properly.

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      OYSTER SOUP.

      To one quart of oysters add half pint water, put the oysters on the fire in the liquor, the moment it begins to simmer (not boil, for that would shrivel the oysters), pour it through a colander into a hot dish, leaving the oysters in the colander. Now put into the sauce piece butter size of an egg, when it bubbles sprinkle in a table-spoonful of sifted flour, let it cook a few minutes stirring it well, then add to it gradually the oyster juice and one-half pint of good cream (which has been brought to a boil in another vessel), season carefully with cayenne.

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      SALT MACKEREL.

      Soak your fish over night in milk if you have it; if not, in water; put the mackerel in a frying pan with cold water enough to cover. When it boils for five minutes put it into a warm dish, putting bits of butter over it. Set in the oven for a few minutes before serving.

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      SCOTCH POTATO SOUP.

      One pound of pork or mutton, one ham bone, one onion, four potatoes, two grated carrots, one head celery. Pepper and salt to taste. Cover the meat with four quarts of cold water, skim well, add onion, carrots and celery cut fine, to which add potatoes that have been sliced and parboiled. Boil three hours. The potatoes are more digestible if they are boiled for a few minutes in hot water before putting them in the soup.

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      STEWED CELERY.

      Clean the heads thoroughly. Take off the coarse green outer leaves. Cut in small pieces and stew in a little broth. When tender add some rich cream, a little flour and butter, enough to thicken the cream. Season with pepper and salt.

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      WHITE SAUCE.

      Salmon and white fish, one cup of cream or rich milk, two ounces of butter, two teaspoonfuls of flour, pepper to taste. If liked, a little lemon juice is an improvement, or a little parsley cut fine.

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      TO FRY SMELTS.


      Wash and dry in a cloth, then lightly flour and shake off. Dip in egg, then in bread crumbs, and fry in boiling lard or dripping. Take care not to take off the bread crumbs. These fish may be cooked on the gridiron.

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      TURKEY SOUP.

      Bones of fowl or turkey, carrot, onion, celery, rice, salt and pepper. This is an excellent way to use the rem-nants of fowls or turkey on which considerable meat remains. Put in the soup kettle the carcass, and any bits of stuffing or gravy that remains. Pour over it one quart of cold water. Let the bones simmer for two hours(break the bones before putting them into the water). At the end of two hours strain your stock, wash the pot and put back your stock and add to it more stock if you have it, and if not, add boiling water enough to make a good quart, also a slice of carrot grated, a small onion cut fine, a piece of celery (the coarse pieces may be used for soup), and two tablespoonfuls of rice. At the end of an hour strain again, and serve, salt and pepper to taste.


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      OX-TAIL SOUP.

      Begin to make it the day before you require it. Take two tails, wash clean and put in a kettle with nearly a gallon of cold water, when the meat is well cooked add a small handful of salt, then take out the bones, let it stand covered until the next day. About two hours be-fore dinner, skim the fat off, add an onion, grated carrot (or any vegetable you like) chopping them fine, and a little summer savory.

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      BEETS USED AS A VEGETABLE


      Beets, butter, pepper and salt. Take young beets, wash and boil the whole for two hours, or until they are soft, then slice and season with pepper, salt and a little butter.
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      OMELET WITH BACON

      For four eggs take two ounces of breakfast bacon, cut it into small dice, cook it until light brown, and mix with your eggs before baking.

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      PUMPKIN PIE

      The first essential is a good, sweet, field pumpkin. Peel it and cut it in pieces and cook it very slowly for four or five hours with only water enough to keep it from burning. This slow cooking makes the pumpkin rich and sweet. When it is done, mash it and strain it through a colander, and to two cupfuls of strained pumpkin add slowly two and a half cupfuls of boiling milk, half a teaspoonful of salt, one dessertspoonful of ginger , one of cinnamon, one of mace and one of nutmeg. Beat well five eggs, stir them in a cupful of cream and add one cup sugar to sweeten the whole. Line tin pie plates with plain pastry, brush it over with the white of an egg, crimp an ornamental border of puff paste around the pie and fill it with the pumpkin custard. bake the pies in a moderately hot oven till they are firm in the centre and brown. This makes three pies.

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      MUSHROOMS BROILED

      Gather them fresh, pare and cut off the stems, dip them in melted butter, season with salt and pepper, broil them on both sides over a clear fire. Serve on toast.

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      CHEESE OMELET

      One cup bread crumbs dry and fine, two scant cups fresh milk, one-half pound dry old cheese grated, three eggs, one small tablespoonful butter, pepper and salt, pinch soda, eggs whipped very light, butter melted, a pinch of soda dissolved in hot water and stirred into the milk, soak the crumbs in the milk, beat into these the eggs, butter, seasoning, and lastly the cheese, butter a baking dish and pour into it, strew dry bread crumbs on the top and bake in a rather quick oven until delicately brown. Serve at once.

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      PRESERVED PEARS WITH GINGER


      To preserve pears with ginger, weigh out three-quarters of a pound of sugar to every pound of pears. Boil four ounces of whole ginger, then add four pounds of sugar and the juice of one lemon, and its yellow peel cut into thin slices, do not use any of the bitter white peel next tot he fruit. Let the syrup cook ten minutes more; then set the syrup at the back of the fire. Peel the fruit , cut each pear in half, removing the flower and core and drop it at once into the hot syrup. This will prevent their turning dark, as they certainly will if exposed to the air after they are peeled.

      When you have a kettleful of the pears, cook them until tender. Fill the jars with them, place the cover over lightly, and prepare another kettleful of pears to cook in the syrup. Divide up the slices of lemon peel and pieces of ginger equally among the jars. This is a most delicious and rich preserve, and is especially nice when served like preserved ginger with ice-cream.
    Name  Maggie McNaught 
    Name  Margaret "Maggie" Young 
    Religion  1911  Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Presbyterian 
    Eby ID Number  Waterloo-63860 
    Died  29 Nov 1927  Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID  I63860  Generations
    Last Modified  10 Jul 2017 

    Father  John McNaught,   b. 25 Jul 1811, of, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Nov 1877, Tuckersmith, Huron Co., Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother  Sarah Kirkpatrick,   b. 1809,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Family ID  F16676  Group Sheet

    Family  James Young, MP,   b. 24 May 1835, Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Jan 1913, Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  11 Feb 1858  Brantford, Brant Co., Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Children 
     1. Amelia Young,   b. 1855, , Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     2. John Young,   b. 1863, , Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Family ID  F16674  Group Sheet

  • Notes 
    • Mrs. James Young has many recipes in The New Galt Cook Book and was a prominent member of the community. Her husband was an MP and wrote a history of Galt that is still useful to historians. She started out as Margaret "Maggie" McNaught in Scotland and came to Canada when she was about 4. Maggie and James married in Paris Ontario in 1858 and had two children. According to Geoffrey Hayes author of Waterloo County: An Illustrated History, Maggie became involved as a witness in 1893 when the keepers of the Waterloo County House of Industry and Refuge (the "poor house") were under investigation for mistreating inmates of this public institution. She testified about the poor conditions she'd seen while visiting a woman residing there.

  • Sources 
    1. [S259] Census - ON, Waterloo, Galt - 1901, Galt (Town/Ville) C-7 Page 14.

    2. [S336] Census - ON, Waterloo, Galt - 1881, Galt Division 2 Page 36.

    3. [S570] Census - ON, Waterloo, Galt - 1871, Div. 2, Pg. 42.

    4. [S572] Census - ON, Waterloo, Galt - 1911, Div. 17 Page 20.

    5. [S1838] Census - ON, Waterloo, Galt - 1861, Galt 1861 Div. 3 Page 38.

    6. [S14] News - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Berlin Chronicle (1856-1860), 17 Feb 1858.
      In Brantford, at the residence of the bride's father, on the 11th inst., by the Rev. John Dunbar, Glenmorris, James Young, Esq., of the Galt "Reformer," to Miss Margaret McNaught, Brantford.

  • Event Map
    Event
    Link to Google MapsBirth - 18 Dec 1837 - , Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsImmigration - 1841 - Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsImmigration - 1841 - , Ontario Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1858 - Brantford, Brant Co., Ontario Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 11 Feb 1858 - Brantford, Brant Co., Ontario Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsReligion - United Presbyterian Church - 1861 - Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsReligion - U. Presbyterian - 1871 - Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsRecipes - 1898 - Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsReligion - Presbyterian - 1911 - Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 29 Nov 1927 - Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario Link to Google Earth
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