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John Goldie[1]
Male 1793 - 1886


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  • Birth  31 Mar 1793  Kirkoswald, , Ayr, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3, 4, 5, 6
    Gender  Male 
    Famous  Botanist 
    Aspidium Goldianum
    Aspidium Goldianum
    Occupation  1861  North Dumfries Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Miller 
    Religion  1861  North Dumfries Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Free Church 
    Residence  1880  Ayr, North Dumfries Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    Occupation  1881  North Dumfries Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Not Given 
    Religion  1881  North Dumfries Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    C. Presbyterian 
    Residence  1884  Ayr, North Dumfries Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    John Goldie's residence built in 1884 in Ayr, Ontario
    John Goldie's residence built in 1884 in Ayr, Ontario
    Grace Schmidt Room of Local History Digital Collection
    Died  25 Jun 1886  Ayr, North Dumfries Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 5, 8
    Cause: Cause: Senile Debility 
    Hall of Fame - Waterloo Region  Bef 2012  , Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    Hall of Fame - Waterloo Region  Bef 2012  , Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    Eby ID Number  Waterloo-95846P 
    Buried  Ayr Cemetery, Ayr, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 5, 6
    Person ID  I95846  Generations
    Last Modified  21 Oct 2018 

    Family  Margaret Ballantyne Smith,   b. 21 Sep 1791, , Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Feb 1878, Greenfield (Reidsville), Waterloo County, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  11 Nov 1815  AYR, , Ayr, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [10
    Children 
     1. Elisabeth Goldie,   b. 9 Nov 1820, Ayr, North Dumfries Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 May 1854, Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location
     2. John Goldie,   b. 6 Aug 1822, AYR, , Ayr, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Mar 1896, Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. James Goldie,   b. 6 Nov 1824, , Ayrshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Nov 1912, Guelph City, Wellington Co., Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. Jean Goldie,   b. 12 Apr 1827, , Ayrshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1862, , Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location
     5. Margaret Goldie,   b. 1 May 1830, Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 May 1913, , York Co., Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location
     6. David Goldie,   b. 15 Jul 1831, Kirkoswald, , Ayr, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Sep 1894, Ayr, North Dumfries Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location
     7. Mary Goldie,   b. 3 Jul 1834, , Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Apr 1911, Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location
    Family ID  F24735  Group Sheet

  • Photos
    John Goldie
    John Goldie

  • Notes 
    • Died, In Ayr, on Thursday, 25th inst, at 6 o'clock A.M. John Goldie, in his 94th year. Funeral on Saturday, 26th inst., at 2 o'clock p.m., from the residence of his son, Mr. David Goldie, to the place of interment, New Cemetery, Ayr. Friends and acquaintances respectfully invited. The Gore, Ayr, June 25, 1886.

      \bFuneral Card

      __________________________

      GOLDIE, JOHN, naturalist. B. at Kirkoswold, Ayrshire, Scot., 21 Mch -1793 ; d. at Ayr, Ont., 23 July. In early life he became connected with the Botanic Gardens, at Glasgow, Scot., then under the charge of the late Sir William Hooker with whom he studied Botany. Among his fellow students was Mr. Douglass, after whom the " Douglass Pine" was named, and who travelled extensively in British Columbia and Oregon and was afterwards killed in the Sandwich Islands.

      Mr. G. was married in 1815 to Margaret Dunlop Smith, a dau. of Mr. Jas. Smith, of Monkwood Grove, Ayrshire, a prominent Botanist and Nurseryman. During the same year the Govt having determined on sending an expedition to the Coast of Africa to explore the Congo river, Mr. G., after passing a strict examination, was selected to accompany the expedition as Botanist, but at the last moment was superseded a circumstance to which he no doubt owed his life, as the person selected to take his place as well as a great many of the officers and crew died of the coast fever, and the expedition was abandoned.

      In 1817, at the instance of Sir Win. Hooker, Mr. G. visited this continent and travelled in Can. and the U. S., making extensive collections of the Botanical treasures of both countries, as the result of which he introduced into Europe many new and rare plants amongst others the Fern "Aspidium Goldianum," which was named after him. Mr. G. returned to Eng. the next year, but visited Can. again in 1819 and made further explorations, travelling on toot from Montreal to Pittsburgh, Pa., and making a thorough examination of the Botanical productions of the country through which he passed. A journal, which he kept during this journey and in which he fully describes the country through which he passed, is very interesting. Having spent 2 years in these explorations, he returned to Eng. About this time the Emperor of Russia having caused a Botanical Garden to be established at St. Petersburg)), Mr. G was employed to make a collection of plants for it. During his residence in Russia he made extensive explorations and introduced many plants and trees into cultivation hitherto unknown to science.

      About the year 1830 he again proceeded to Russia and travelled extensively in Siberia, following his favorite pursuit. The curator of the gardens at St. Petersburg (Prof. Fischer), being an old college friend, he was enabled through him to introduce many rare plants into Engl. Having formed a favorable opinion of Can. as a place of residence on his visits in 1817 and 1819, he brought his family here in 1844 and settled near the village of Ayr, Ont., where he continued to reside until his death. During his lifetime he kept up correspondence with many prominent Botanists and more particularly with his friend, Sir Wm. Hooker. He left 3 sons and 2 daughters to survive him, viz. : Mr. John Goldie, of the firm of Goldie & McCulloch, of Galt ; Mr. Jas. Goldie, of Guelph ; Mr. David Goldie, of Ayr, and Margaret, wife of Rev. Prof. Caven, of Toronto, and Mary, wife of Mr. A. McIlwraith, of Galt.

      Henry James Morgan, The Dominion Annual Register and Review. for the twentieth year of the Canadian Union, 1886. pg 269-270

      ________________

      JOHN GOLDIE a man greatly beloved We speak of him, not to eulogize him but simply to point out the lessons of his life. He needs no words of eulogy uttered in his behalf, the unadorned facts of his life are his highest praise.

      John Goldie s character was one of singular simplicity and of rare beauty. It was charged with a quiet, unaffected, winsome sweetness that laid hold of all who came within the circle of his influence. He was sterlingly true, and, therefore, upright, and modest, and unpretentious, and unassuming. Of him it might be said, as was sung of one of his relations before him:

      "Thine was the soul that ever viewed Deceit with deep disdain, Nor ever on thy manhood cast Dishonor s faintest stain.

      "The singleness of mind and heart, The proud humility, That would have scorned before the world To seem, and not to be."

      He was honest in the depths of his nature, and in all its outworking. So much so, that it shone in the most transparent way in thought and word and deed. His whole life was a grandly honest life. In coming into his presence you felt this as the atmosphere he carried about him, and when he spoke the conclusion you had reached was confirmed. He was very reserved, and, consequently, unobtrusive, undemonstrative and unostentatious. He had a real and a marked humility. As one of the men long in his service and in close relations with him said to me, speaking of this: " His humility was rather under." That is, it was excessive. He had a strong dislike to show and empty pomp and mere display. There was too much of the childish in that for his strong, robust and manly nature. But with all his heart he loved reality; reality alone claimed his respect and sincere admiration. He was a worshipper of the truth. He was kind in a high degree, and his kindness was marked by a wisdom which made it doubly precious. Like all noble natures, he was unsuspicious and confiding, and taking others as being like himself, he was often sorely deceived and disappointed, but these experiences never bred in him any taint or touch of bitterness. He was utterly unselfish; he lived for others; he was generous wherever there was need; he was honorable to a fault his word once given stood. He was a man of large intelligence and of wide culture, and when he had in any matter reached a decision he was like a 19 Roman soldier in holding his position, nothing but the best reasons would alter his attitude. And behind every quality he had a firm and unbending will, a well-instructed and finely balanced mind, a sound and enlightened judgment, and a heart of genuine charity.

      And whence came this character, marked by all the elements of true greatness? It would be hard to tell how much he inherited from his worthy parents, who were at once godly and intellectual, and of great strength of character. Or how much he got from the sacred region where he first saw the light and spent his busy youth a region marked with monuments to the memory of the martyrs of the covenant; where the very air is charged with stirring and holy traditions; where every spot speaks of unswerving devotion to Christ, the King and Head of his Church; where Christian principle was life, and divine truth the food by which it was sustained; or how much he cultivated into character by the force of his own will and the grace of God working in his own heart. It would be difficult to make the analysis, but, no doubt, all wrought together to produce the result. We only reach the lowest stratum which upholds all the rest, and gives form and distinctive shape and living spirit to all the rest, when we come to his religious life.

      This was the corner stone of the entire structure and the indwelling spirit of the whole life. It was used as a power, and not paraded as a possession. It spoke through the life, and not by the lips. It was seen in doing and not in saying. It proclaimed itself in a consistent course of Christian conduct, which all were compelled to admire, and which, we trust, many will be constrained to imitate. For " by it he being dead yet speaketh." The whole of John Goldie's life stood in the closest possible connection with religious motives. His early training, his thorough knowledge of the Scriptures, his earnest and deep consideration of the truth, and the strong convictions at which he had arrived and which became ruling principles in him, made him the godly man he was in his home, the consistent and honorable member he was of the Church, the useful and influential citizen he was in our town, and the highly respected and trusted business man he was all over this con tinent, the name of the firm of which he was the leading member being everywhere the synonym for truth and honesty.

      While Mr. Goldie carried his light everywhere, yet it was in his home that it shone with peculiar lustre. There it was felt in tender affection, in affability, in loving kindness, in genial courtesy, and in an unaffected, charming grace. One sentence from a letter I received last July from a brother minister who had the happiness of spending a few days with him, speaks volumes, so that on this point we need add nothing more. I may say that the writer is a shrewd, keen-eyed man, and this is his revealing sentence: " I shall not soon forget the kindness of Mr. Goldie and his family. Homes like Mr. Goldie's manifest the grace of the Lord Jesus better than many sermons and loud professions. To stay in that home for the brief space permitted to me was the very sweetest experience of my visit East."

      Of his church relations, I may say that he was a regular attendant on ordinances, liberal in his support of every good cause; seeking zealously the extension of Christ s kingdom at home and abroad. Unlike many who are church members, and who rest content with a superficial knowledge and comprehension of things, he thought deeply on the great problems of existence and responsibility and duty. And in doing so he took broad views, gathering into his consideration many facts; looking at all questions through the undimmed atmosphere of the holy Word. He had a clear apprehension and firm grip of the principles of the Bible and he held them fast with genuine Puritan loyalty, God's word being ever final with him. His presence with us was a continual source of inspiration and of strength. He, as a Christian man, stood for something because he was entirely surrendered to God. And all he did, and all he was, manifested his godliness. For lives like his the world is in pressing need to-day. Lives that in every relation and in every engagement, reveal the presence and the power of Christian motives. Lives that possess grace and do not only profess grace. Lives that are embodiments of truth and not only speakers about truth. John Goldie was identified with this congregation all through its history, and was from the first one of its main pillars. We thank God for him to-day, as one of His good gifts to us, whose memory is very precious.

      Among his men John Goldie was always a favorite. He went among them in the most kindly and brotherly way. Being a genuine man, he felt himself one of them. He had a heart for every workman. His visits to the shops were always welcome as he threw a pleasant smile here and a kindly word there. And if help were needed, he was ever ready to lend assistance. There was in him no haughty pride, no contemptuous looking down on the men, no assertion of superiority, but rather that of strong, all conquering sympathy.

      On every hand, I have heard expressions of the highest regard and sincerest affection for Mr. Goldie on the part of the men. They all loved him because he loved them. And I have no hesitation in saying that John Goldie, by his sympathy with his men, by the true kindness of his heart, held the key to the solution of the great problem of our time, namely, the relation of capital and labor.

      That solution lies in real heartfelt sympathy. Treating workmen as brethren. When Judge Talfourd was dying he uttered this truth for England, which is a truth for all the world: " That which is wanted to hold together the bursting bonds of the different classes of this country, is not kindness but sympathy." There can be no question that this Scripture truth, added to and reinforcing his own sense of right, led him to this course of action. " Masters give unto your servants that which is just and equal, knowing that ye also have a Master in Heaven." (Col. 4. i.) Of Mr. Goldie s beneficence we need not say anything. The daily press has been referring to his many gifts to public institutions, but they have not a complete list, nor are they likely to have that, for he did not give to be seen of men. He disliked publicity, and especially in this, but we know that his gifts were liberal and his beneficiaries many. He had learned the luxury of doing good. He had learned, too, the spiritual use of money.

      Of Mr. Goldie s scientific discoveries we have all been reading, but who among us knew that before? This but reveals how great a man we have lost. " His soul was like a star and dwelt apart" He was one of the oldest, best-known and most highly respected men in the community, a source of strength to every good cause. The large place he held in public esteem was witnessed by the respect shown on the day of his interment, when the places of business were closed, when the town bell tolled in turn with Trinity Church bell, when the Town Council and many societies took places in the procession, and flags hung half-mast all over the town; all sorrowing under the grief of a common loss. What underlay this unusual and universal exhibition of regard and affection ? The fact that Mr. Goldie stood for truth and honesty and sympathy, and great worth, and true humility. Throughout his protracted and painful sickness, he was patient without a murmur, submissive to the Divine will, leaving himself in God's hands with his accustomed sweetness of temper, and gradually sank till his departure was more like translation than death. His life was rounded off with an end full of repose in the Lord, " and by it he being dead yet speaketh." His loss makes a great void in our community. But in the life he lived and the blessed memories that are ours, he has enriched us with a heritage that is worth more than gold. A good man's memory is imperishable. " And he being dead yet speaketh." 3a

      3a\b
      Ebenezer: A History of the Central Presbyterian Church, Galt, Ontario, with brief sketches of some of its members who have passed on the the other side, The Rev. James A. R. Dickson
      Goldie Family Long Prominent In West Ontario
      John Goldie, Founder of the Family In this Province, Located At Ayr in 1844

      By Dr. A.E. Byerly

      The recent election in South Wellington, to which the Hon. Lincoln Goldie was returned to office in the Ontario Legislature by a very substantial majority, will recall to many throughout Western Ontario the pioneer history of the Goldie family.

      There is likely no name better known in the history of Waterloo and Wellington counties than that of Goldie. It is unfortunate, however, that only a few of the grandchildren of the original settler, John Goldie, are living in this part of Ontario. In Guelph there remain but two grandchildren, both distinguished citizens for many years, namely, the Hon. Lincoln Goldie, provincial secretary, and his brother, Roswell Goldie, the well-known historian.

      John Goldie, who was the founder of the family in Ontario, was born Marcy 31, 1793, in the parish of Kirkswald, Ayrshire, Scotland, and came to Ayr, Ontario, in the year 1844. Mr. Goldie was a great lover of plants and flowers and received a thorough training in botany. He entered university, where he turned his attention to language. He was married on Waterloo Day, June 15, 1815, to Margaret Ballantyne Smith, daughter of James Smith, a well-known florist and botanist of that day, residing at Monkwood Grove, near Minishant, Ayrshire.

      Explores In Canada

      Mr. Goldie came to America in 1817 and landed at Halifax, where he did some exploring and also on the north shore of New Brunswick and collected specimens of many plants and flowers, several of them new to science. Thence he traveled to Quebec and Montreal, meeting at the later place Frederick Pursh, the celebrated botanist, who presented him with a copy of his book The American Plants. Mr. Goldie was the discoverer of a beautiful fern near Montreal, which was named by Dr. Hookuc after him, the Aspidium Goldianum. Three shipments of his collections to the old land were lost. He had been for two years collecting in Canada, New York and New Jersey, and the fruits of those two years research were gone.

      However, he was able to get together a goodly collection of plants after his first failures to get them across, and those he took with him on his return to Scotland in the fall of 1819. He later made trips to Russia and was able to introduce into England a number of plants heretofore unknown in the country.

      Mr. Goldie had been so well impressed with the land across the seas that his two sons William and James preceded him to the United States. Mr. Goldie and the remaining children emigrated from Scotland in 1844 to an area near Ayr, which they named Greenfield after a place near their home in Scotland. With Mr. and Mrs. Goldie were their children, John, David, Elizabeth, Jane, Margaret and Mary. William, who had been in New York, now joined the family in Ayr, but James remained in New York until 1860, when he came to Canada and settled in Guelph.

      The Ayr Farm

      At the farm near Ayr, Mr. Goldie imported fruit trees, shrubs and plants from England, and in a letter to his son in New York we obtain a picture of the varied activities of the Ontario pioneer. Quoting from that letter, "We sowed our wheat on the 9th of April. It looks very well except a bit that has been much hurt by the wine-worm. David is plowing the high field for our grass crop. William and I have been very busy rooting out the pine stumps and have made a considerable clearance. I would strongly advise against buying a wagon, as John can make what we want in that way and money is wanted to pay for our land. We have wood seasoning for a common wagon. John has his machinery in operation and it answers well. He has made several beds and other things and is likely to get plenty of work, but the evil is that the cash is not easily gotten,"

      The first industry established by the Goldie family along with their farm work was a sawmill, but this was given up in 1849 and the sons, William, John and David worked hard in 1850 to finish building their flour mill, which had been planned along with an oatmeal mill. In November it was complete, but for several years it was a struggle to keep going. From 1854 the business began to be a paying one, and at last success came to the young men who had planned, built and struggled along against severe odds and hardships.

      The mill at Ayr continued to be run for many years by John Goldie and his son David. John, Jr., along with his brother-in-law, started a sawmill in the Township of Esquesing, near Acton, which they operated for several years. However, in 1859, John, Jr., returned to Galt and with Hugh McCulloch bought the Dumfries Foundry. This establishment is now the largest in Galt and is owned by the sons of John Goldie, Jr., and Hugh McCulloch.

      William Goldie, the eldest son, was never married and died in the United States in the early sixties. John, Jr., died in 1896, David died in 1894, and James in November, 1912.

      Elizabeth, the oldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Goldie, Sr., was married to Sydney Smith, of Galt, later of Acton, and she died in 1854, having been born November 9, 1820. Jane, the second daughter, was married to Andrew McEwan in 1847. She died in 1862 and left seven children. Margaret was married to the Rev. Dr. Caven, of Knox College, Toronto, and died May 22, 1913. Mary married Andrew McIlwraith, of Galt, in 1862 and died in Galt in April, 1911, a family of five surviving her.

      John Goldie, Sr., gave up active business in his later life and devoted his time to his beloved flowers and plants. He died in July 1886, in his 94th year. His wife died February 21, 1878, in her 87th year. They were indeed honored pioneers of western Ontario. The milling business so successfully started by John Goldie and his sons continued to be run by David Goldie, and as it was one of the first mills in Ontario to adopt the roller process of making flour, enjoyed a large measure of success in consequence. The mill was sold some years ago and passed entirely out of the hands of the Goldie family. The old homestead at Ayr is still in the possession of the family.

      Free Press London Ontario - November 23, 1929 - retyped by Jane Gillard

  • Sources 
    1. [S5] Vit - - ON, Waterloo - 1858-1869 Marriage Register.
      John Goldie Birth Place: Ayr, Scotland RESIDENCE: Esquesing Age: 36 Estimated Birth Year: abt 1822 Father Name: John Mother Name: Marg Smith Spouse Name: Elizabeth Alexander Spouse's Age: 22 Spouse Estimated Birth Year: abt 1836 Spouse Birth Place: Westmeath, Ireland Spouse Residence: North Dumfries Spouse Father Name: William Spouse Mother Name: Marian M. Marriage Date: 5 Feb 1858 Marriage County: Waterloo

    2. [S205] Census - ON, Waterloo, North Dumfries - 1881, North Div. 2 Page 78.

    3. [S184] Funeral Card - - Funeral Card Notices of Waterloo County from 1851 to 1980, Funeral Card of John Goldie.

    4. [S1778] Census - ON, Waterloo, North Dumfries - 1861, Div 7 Page 57.

    5. [S367] Cemetery - ON, Waterloo, Ayr - Ayr Public CC#4489 Internet Link .
      In memory of/ John Goldie/ died 25th June 1886,/ In his 94th year./ Margaret Ballantyne/ Smith/ wife of John Goldie,/ died 18th Nov. 1878/ aged 87 years./ E. C. Goldie/ 1884 - 1980

    6. [S367] Cemetery - ON, Waterloo, Ayr - Ayr Public CC#4489 Internet Link .
      [East] Goldie
      [East/Southeast] Son of/ John & Florence/ Goldie/ Hugh/ 1906/ John Goldie/ son of/ David Goldie/ died at Victoria, B. C./ 1870 - 1947/ Florence/ Donaldson/ wife of John Goldie/ died at Victoria, B. C./ 1870 - 1944
      [Southeast] Sons of/ George & Lydia/ Goldie/ Barton/ 1905/ MacDonald/ 1906/ William Goldie M. D./ Third son of/ David Goldie/ 1873 - 1950/ Theresa Falkner/ youngest daughter of/ David Goldie/ 1889 - / John William Falkner/ 1889 - 1959
      [West] David Goldie/ born/ 15th July 1831/ died 24th Sept. 1894/ Isabella M. Easton/ his wife/ born 14th April 1847/ died/ 17th July 1929/ David Moray/ Goldie/ born/ 13th Oct. 1891/ died 22nd May 1912/ Goldie
      [North/Northwest] In memory of/ John Goldie/ died 25th June 1886,/ In his 94th year./ Margaret Ballantyne/ Smith/ wife of John Goldie,/ died 18th Nov. 1878/ aged 87 years./ E. C. Goldie/ 1884 - 1980
      [East/Northeast] Janet Doak/ died 18th Nov. 1870/ aged 80 years./ Elizabeth Smith/ died/ 30th March 1886/ aged 84 years.

    7. [S107] Book - The Canadian Biographical Dictionary and Portrait Gallery of Eminent and Self-Made Men, Ontario Volume, 1880.

    8. [S116] Vit - ON - Death Registration.
      Name: John Goldie Gender: Male Birth Year: abt 1793 Birth Place: Scotland Age at Death: 93 Death Date: 25 Jun 1886 Death Place: Waterloo, Ontario, Canada

    9. [S220] Waterloo Region Hall of Fame Waterloo Region Hall of Fame.

    10. [S27] International Genealogical Index - Extracted Church Records, Parish registers for Ayr, 1664-1854 Church of Scotland. Parish Church of Ayr (Ayrshire) Film: 1041331.
      John Goldie married Margaret Smith 11 Nov 1815 Ayr, Ayr, Scotland

  • Event Map
    Event
    Link to Google MapsBirth - 31 Mar 1793 - Kirkoswald, , Ayr, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 11 Nov 1815 - Ayr, , Ayr, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Miller - 1861 - North Dumfries Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsReligion - Free Church - 1861 - North Dumfries Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1880 - AYR, North Dumfries Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Not Given - 1881 - North Dumfries Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsReligion - C. Presbyterian - 1881 - North Dumfries Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1884 - AYR, North Dumfries Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Cause: Cause: Senile Debility - 25 Jun 1886 - AYR, North Dumfries Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsHall of Fame - Waterloo Region - Bef 2012 - , Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsHall of Fame - Waterloo Region - Bef 2012 - , Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Ayr Cemetery, Ayr, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth