Waterloo Region Generations
A record of the people of Waterloo Region, Ontario.

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301 "Mrs. John Knorr, 59, of 236 Courtland Ave. died early today at the KW Hospital following a lingering illness. She was the former Adeline Lederman. Mrs. Knorr was born at New Dundee on July 23, 1881. She attended Redeemer Lutheran church, Waterloo.

Surviving are her husband, four sons, Howard of Waterloo, Harry, Wilfred and Burton, at home, three brothers, William Lederman of Conestogo, Harry Lederman of Petersburg and Alex Lederman of Baden, and a sister, Mrs. E. Leach of Walkerton....Mount Hope Cemetery..."

KW Record obit. of Tues., July 30, 1940 
Lederman, Adeline "Addie" (I444163)
 
302 "Mrs. Lafayette VanSickle, 80, a native of the New Dundee district, died Tuesday at South Waterloo Hospital, Galt, after a lengthy illness.

She was the former Edna Cassel, d/o the late Mr. & Mrs. Josiah Cassel. She lived in Western Canada for many years and later in Hamilton before returning to this district. Her husband died in 1952.

Surviving are three sons, Calvin of Dundas, Marvin of Burlington and Lincoln of Agincourt; three daughters, Mrs. hardie (Aileen) Clarim of Calgary, Mrs. Fred (Muriel) Henderson of Vancouver, and Mrs. James (Heloise) Lorimer of Airdrie, Alta., and one brother, Lincoln H. Cassel of New Dundee...White Brick Church Cemetery on Highway 53, near Ancaster."

KW Record obit. of Wed., June 10, 1964 
Cassel, Edna Estella (I6167)
 
303 "Mrs. Margaret Rudy, 83, died yesterday morning at her home near Heidelberg. She was born in Woolwich Tp. Her husband, Joshua Rudy, died three months ago. Surviving are two sons, Israel and Aaron, at home, and one daughter, Mrs.Cyrus (Melinda) Martin, of New Jerusalem...."

Kitchener Daily Record 31 Jul 1944


Margaret is referred to as Rebecca in Ezra Eby's book, but all birth records of children and census indicate Margaret. 
Spaetz, Margaret (I57439)
 
304 "Mrs. S. A. Brubacher, 81, of 184 Strange St., died suddenly at her home today.

Born in Erbsville, she was a d/o the late Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Neuber. She attended Calvary Memorial Church and was a member of the Ladies Aid of the church. She was predeceased by her first husband, August Protzman, 39 years ago. Her second husband, S. A. Brubacher, survives.

Also surviving are three sons, Clayton and Laverne Protzman of Detroit and Delcon Protzman of Caseville, Mich.; one daughther, Thelma Protzman of Kitchener; three brothers, Joel and Isaac of Kitchener and John of Milwaukee; one sister, Mrs. Emma Perschbacher of Waterloo; four grandchildren...."

KW Record obit. of Wed., March 8, 1950 
Neuber, Mary Ann (I318221)
 
305 "Mrs. Selina Coxon, 74, of 56 Alexandra Ave., Waterloo, died Mon. at KW Hospital following a lengthy illness. Born Apr. 17, 1897 in New Hamburg, she was a d/o the late George Bean and Brettina Reddaway.

She was a member of First United Church, Waterloo, the Women's Ass'n and the Women's Missionary Society of that church. Her husband, John Coxon, predeceased her 28 years ago.

Surviving are one son, William of Waterloo; one daughter, Mrs. James (Minnie) Lautenschlager of Kitchener; four brothers, Herbert of Lindsay, Percy of Brantford, Russell of London and Earl of Regina, Sask.; two sisters, Mrs. Mary Robb of Princeton and Mrs. Ada Motherall of Preston. Six grandchildren also survive. Three sisters predeceased her...Riverside Cemetery, New Hamburg."

KW Record obit. of Tues., Dec. 15, 1953 
Bean, Selina Melinda (I78951)
 
306 "Nearly all the Hoffmans of this county are descendants of old George whose parents were natives of Switzerland. Old George resided in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, where he raised a family of eight children, namely:...Of the above family some of the descendants of George and Peter settled in Canada."


Eby, Ezra E. (1895). A biographical history of Waterloo township and other townships of the county: being a history of the early settlers and their descendants, mostly all of Pennsylvania Dutch origin: as also much other unpublished historical information chiefly of a local character. Berlin [Kitchener, Ont.]: [s.n.]. 
Hoffman, George (I1984)
 
307 "Noah B. CLEMENS was born in Waterloo Co., Ontario, Can., Oct. 29, 1849. He is a son of Amos M. and Mary Wismer Clemens, the former a native of Bucks Co., Pa., born Feb. 13, 1819 and the latter of Canada, born June 21, 1821. They were married in 1841 and had seven children, six of whom are living. Henry, Abram, Mary A. (wife of Ed. Williams). Noah B., Rachel, Edwin W. C., and Lydia (Mrs. W. B. Bowman). Mr. Clemens was married April 8, 1873, to Mary M., daughter of Owen and Mary Levagood Dodge, born in Waterloo Co., Ca., April 4, 1850. They have two children: Vermellie, born Sept. 11, 1874, and Audie, born Feb. 26, 1878. Mr. Clemens came to this tp. with his parents in 1863, and now owns a farm of 120 acres on sec. 17. He is a Republican. Mrs. Clemens parents settled in Gaines in the pioneer days of 1855. Her brother, Samuel Dodge, enlisted in the late war November 1861, in Co. A., 3d Reg. Mich. Inf., and was killed at Fair Oaks. He sleeps with the heroic dead on the battlefield where he fell."

History of Kent County, Michigan, Illustrated, Chicago. Chas C. Chapman & Co., 1881, Pg 739: 
Dodge, Samuel (I24552)
 
308 "North Ward" Moritz Schmidt, near the station, the large new coffin factory, and beside it, his large 2-storey residence

"Progress in Berlin" articles from the Berliner Journal 1873-1903, Grace Schmidt Room of Local History, Kitchener Public Library. Nov. 19, 1874, p. 7 
Schmidt, Heinrich Moritz "Moritz" "Morris" "Maurice" (I177983)
 
309 "Notes of Interest for Descendants of John Henry and Elizabeth Rife. The town of Hespeler was incorporated into the City of Cambridge in 1973 along with Galt, Preston and some nearby villages. One of the requirements of this amalgamation was the elimination of any duplication in Street names. There was a Henry Street in Galt, Preston and Hespeler. Henry Street Hespeler was named in honour of John Henry. The Galt Street, being by far the longest, was to retain its name, while the Preston and Hespeler Street were to be renamed. I (Robert L. Henry, Halifax) did not agree with this decision and decided to take action. I prepared a court brief and presented it to the judge at the hearing in Kitchener, Ontario. I knew that it was an uphill fight to retain the name "Henry" only on the street, so my conclusion in the brief was a request to rename the street "Henry Villa Drive." "Henry Villa" was the name of John Henry's home. This was authorized by the Court, so now Henry Street in the Hespeler portion of Cambridge is now known as "Henry Villa Drive." The following is a small street map of the old farm area in Hespeler in which streets of interest to the family are shown. Milton Avenue is named after my uncle George Milton. Austin Avenue is named after my uncle James Austin. Emerson Street is named after my father Thomas Emerson. (I don't know why they didn't get a street named for uncle Bert, Aunt Mildred or Aunt Bella when they were at it)."

Henry (1802-1845) was a younger brother of Reverend Thomas. He was married around 1825 and it is believed his wife was an Ellis from the Oshawa area. James and his wife moved to the Guelph area about 1830 (Guelph was founded in 1827) and raised a family of nine children. The next set of notes concerns the family of James Henry (1802-1845). Except for his son John (1840-1903) very little is known. The names below were taken from county records of Guelph and Waterloo and others were names of my father's first cousins. John Henry (1840-1903). John lived all his life in the vicinity of Hespeler (except for a brief stay in California). He married Elizabeth Rife (1842-1926) from Berlin (Kitchener), Ontario. They raised a family of two daughters and four sons. Henry Re-Unions. The plans for having an annual Henry Re-Union were drawn up in Hespeler during the funeral of Elizabeth (Rife) Henry on August 13, 1926. The first Re-Union was held at Arthur in 1927 and the second was held at Oshawa in 1928."

next set of notes concerns the family of John (1840-1903) and Elizabeth (Rife) (1842-1926). John was a businessman in Hespeler, Ontario. He married Elizabeth Rife on 6 January, 1864 in Berlin (Kitchener) Ontario. In 1866, he built a two storey stone building on the main street of Hespeler which contained two stores on the lower level and his own living quarters on the second storey. He operated a bakery in one store and rented the other. In 1875, he erected another stone building alongside and opened a grocery store. In approximately 1880, he purchased a large farm on which was a huge stone barn, farmhouse and house for the hired help. This was the original farm of Jacob Hespeler for which the town was named. He moved the family to the farm house which was known in the town as the Henry Villa. In 1898, the two buildings on the main street were torn down and the large Henry Block was erected in their place. It was completed in 1901 and still stands today (1974) as an imposing structure on the town's main street. The Henry farm was sold to John Forbes and the buildings torn down for his residence (one square stone tower of the barn remains today). Part of the farm land was used for town development - the remainder stayed as farmland. Today, Alex Forbes (son of George) has a wild bird sanctuary on the farmland."

email from Michael Ellis inkellis@cogeco.ca 2007 
Henry, John (I83499)
 
310 "Oliver H. Becker Is Called by Death,"

Mr. Oliver Herman Becker, Local merchant passed away at his home on Jacob Street, New Hamburg at 10 o'clock on Tuesday evening, November 2nd, aged 61 years. He had been in ill health for several years and was taken very seriously ill about a week before his passing. He was the only son of Daniel Becker and Lydia Schulte and was born in New Hamburg on August 8th, 1887. He received his early school training here and later attended Woodstock College. After his schooling he entered the departmental store of his father and took over the business after the death of his father in 1925. Ollie Becker was a general favorite among his associates and was fond of athletic sports. He was one of the mainstays of the New Hamburg hockey team in the old days of the Oxford-Waterloo league when he helped to win championships for his home town. He was also fond of horses ad an expert horseback rider. Mr. Becker was a member of local Masonic Lodge, and a faithful and active adherent of New Hamburg Baptist church. Mr. Becker was married at Exeter on Nov. 25, 1913, to Miss Hazel I. Browning, daughter of Dr. Robert Browning of that town. He leaves in bereavement his wife, one daughter, Mrs. A. J. Taylor Betty of London, a son Bob at home, and one sister, Mrs. Emil Wurm, of South St. Paul, Minn., and one granddaughter Susan Elizabeth Taylor, of London. The funeral will be held this Friday afternoon with a short private service at his late residence at 2: 00 o'clock, followed by a memorial service at 2: 30 at the Baptist Church, Rev. W. B. Fisher, pastor, will be in charge. Interment will be in Riverside Cemetery. The remains are resting at the home.

New Hamburg Independent, Nov. 5, 1948 
Becker, Oliver Herman (I85955)
 
311 "On a drizzly March afternoon in 1929, a fire tore through the farmhouse and barn owned by Fred Balzer, the bachelor farmer who settled near the hamlet of German Mills.

Neighbours saw the black smoke and rushed to help. But the house, and adjacent barn, could not be saved. In the hours after the blaze was distinguished, the rescuers realized Mary Balzer, Fred's diminutive 63-year-old mother, was missing.

Something about the fire didn't add up. A neighbour claimed Mary Balzer's husband, Victor Balzer, was seen on the road driving away from the farm with his daughter-in-law about an hour before the place burned down.

When he returned to find his home destroyed, another neighbour testified Victor Balzer was more concerned about the well-being of his cattle. He blamed his wife for the fire, according to witnesses who were questioned at an inquest into the death.

Mary Balzer's remains were not found until 10 days later, when a pick and shovel gang of provincial police and local farmers was organized to dig through the farm yard from end to end. They scoured the charred ashes of the house, tore off the cover of the cistern and checked inside.

After several days of searching, investigators found "stumps of arm bones and pelvis," according to a front-page story in The Daily Record on March 26, 1929. But whether or not Mary Balzer was alive when the flames broke out may never be known."....

Kitchener's Balzer Creek has dark history. (2016). Therecord.com. Retrieved 22 October 2016, from https://www.therecord.com/news-story/6924121-kitchener-s-balzer-creek-has-dark-history/ 
Bolardtowa, Marie (I183920)
 
312 "On Monday, Dec. 22, 1986 at KW Hospital, Kitchener, Annie Bond, R.R.#1 New Hamburg, age 72. She was the wife of Ellworth Bean for 46 years. She is survived by daughter Marilyn, wife of Lynn Sararus of New Dundee, son Wilfred of Toronto and grandchildren Jane Anne and David Sararus. Also a brother Robert J. Bond and his wife Laura of Cambridge. She was predeceased by one son John in 1958 and one brother Arthur."

KW Record obit, Dec. 1986
 
Bond, Annie Margaret Isobel (I62497)
 
313 "On October 16th, 1889, our pastor, Dr. Dickson, called a meeting of the young people of the congregation to organize for some definite line of work. It was decided, after having the work explained, to organize a Y.P.S.C.E. The constitution was discussed and adopted in part. The active and associate pledges were read, after which sixteen signed as active members. The following officers were elected: Hon. President, Rev. J. A. R. Dickson, B.D.; President, Mr. A. J. Colvin; Vice-President, Mr. Alex. McDonald; Secretary, Mrs. Goodwin. The following committees were formed, of which the persons whose names are appended were the conveners: Prayer-meeting, Mr. A. W. Wright, B.A.; Lookout, Miss Isa Gardiner; Sunday School, Miss Maggie Dickson; Social, Miss Beckie Goldie; Flower, Mrs. James Risk. The members took up the work in an earnest manner, keeping before them the motto: For Christ and the Church. The strength of our Society was the result of prayer. A Sunday evening prayer-meeting had been held for some time, under the leadership of Mr. A. W. Wright, also a woman s prayer-meeting once a week, both of these asking for special blessing on the young people of the congregation. The work taken up at first was confined to our own church, working along the lines of the different committees. In March we decided to give a free will offering at our monthly consecration meeting. This we still continue to do. ...

1aEbenezer: A History of the Central Presbyterian Church, Galt, Ontario, with brief sketches of some of its members who have passed on the the other side, The Rev. James A. R. Dickson 
Gardiner, Isabella "Isa" (I63948)
 
314 "On the corner, now occupied by Dr. Honsberger's residence, (there was) a two story brick building, for some time the residence of Sheriff (George) Davidson. Before that, 1840 -1860, Jacob Kramer occupied the building as a tavern."1a

1aWaterloo Historical Society Annual Volume 1930 
Kitchener, Frederick St. 0097 - house - brick - 3 storey (I745)
 
315 "On Thursday, August 24, 1950, after a two-hosptilzation, Margaret died. Peter claimed that no one had told him of her illness. The news came as shock. Margaret was only forty. In annoucing her death, Galt's Evening Reporter of August 25 listed her relatives as Reg. Bropwn, Peter, the late McGregor Young, Margaret's mother, her sister, Jean Rowe and her brother Brigadier Gregor Young, all of Toronto. Harold Gzowski received no mention. Young, Margaret McGregor (I415967)
 
316 "One day after the death o fher baby daughter, Mrs. Clarence Shantz, 46, of 438 Alice Ave., died Thursday at St. Mary's Hospital.

Mrs. Shantz's daughter died Wed. a few hours after she was born. Mrs. Shantz died Thursday at 7 p.m.

Born in Kitchener, a d/o Mr. Ernest Miller and the late Mrs. Miller, she was a member of Pentecostal Church.

Surviving besides her father are her husband; five daughters, Mrs. Norman (Muriel) Kunkel, Joan 15, Marie 11, Betty Anne, 5, Beverly 3, all of Kitchener; a brother, Adolph Miller, RR2 Petersburg, a sister, Mrs. Henry (Muriel) Zeller, RR1 Erindale, and two grandchildren....."

KW Record obit. of Fri., Dec. 14, 1956 
Miller, Millicent Elizabeth Hazel (I273396)
 
317 "Originating in the area of Metz, Peter Brick, of catholic confession, his spouse, born Eckert, and their eight children, Pierre, Michel, Nicolas, Elisabeth, Marie, Barbara, Ann, and Catherine, arrived about 1833 in the same town of Waterloo, but they made their home in St Agatha."


L'Émigration des Alsaciens et des Lorrains pg 302 translated into English. 
Brick, Peter (I248602)
 
318 "Orton Weber, 60, of RR2 West Montrose Tp., died suddenly at the KW Hospital yesterday. He suffered a stroke a week ago. A son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Josiah Weber, he was born March 9, 1892.

Surviving besides his wife, the former Amanda Eby, are three sisters, Mrs. Atlanta Martin, Elmira; Mrs. Maurice Kinzie, Breslau; Mrs. Ella Detweiler, Floradale; one brother, Nelson, Elmira. One brother, Ian, predeceased him....."

KW Record obit. of Fri., Sept. 19, 1952

__________________

Weber, -- Orton, son of the late Josiah and Marion (Lichty) Weber, was born March 9, 1892; passed away at the Kitchener-Waterloo Hospital, Sept. 18, 1952; aged 60 y. 6 m. 9 d. On March 21, 1934, he was united in marriage to Amanda Eby. He united with the Mennonite Church early in life, having his membership first in the Sharon congregation, Guernsey, Sask., and since 1928, with the congregation at Elmira, Ont., of which he was a faithful member. Surviving are his wife, 3 foster children (Margaret, George, and Stuart), 3 sisters (Mrs. Altana Martin, Elmira, Ont.; Pearl-Mrs. Maurice Kinzie, Breslau, Ont.; and Mrs. Ella Detweiller, Floradale, Ont.), and one brother (Nelson, Elmira, Ont.). One brother preceded him in death. Funeral services were held Sept. 22, at the home by O. D. Snider and at the Elmira Mennonite Church by O. D. Snider and Howard S. Bauman. Interment was made in the adjoining cemetery.

Gospel Herald - Volume XLV , Number 42 - October 14, 1952 page 1021, 1022
 
Weber, Orton (I17979)
 
319 "Owen Bean, 83?, died today at his residence, 78 Francis Street north. Born in Wilmot Township in the Huron Road district, a son of the late Moses S. Bean and Margaret Detweiler, he was on the Board of Directors of the Dominion Button Limited for more than 25 years. Mr. Bean was an active member of Trinity United Church and of Grand Union Lodge, IOOF. He came to Kitchener at the age of 16 years.

Surviving are his wife and daughter, Mabel, Mrs. Harry F. Cornish of Kitchener....."

KW Record obit. of Dec. 9, 1941 
Bean, Owen (I15618)
 
320 "Pangman, Sask. - Simon Bean, 81, who farmed for many years near Ceylon, Sask., died here Monday (ie: Jan. 22, 1962, mynote). Born in Wilmot Tp., he was the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Noah Bean. He is survived by his wife the former Mae Fitzgerald; a daughter,Mrs. George (Margaret) Sheppard; a sister, Sue Bean, Kitchener, and 4 grandchildren. Predeceased by a brother and 3 sisters." married Mae Fitzgerald b.1887; one child Margaret Bernice b.1917 married George Sheppard (4 children)
 
Bean, Simon (I19436)
 
321 "Peterson: On the 17th inst., at Wellesley, in the neighbouring County of Waterloo, Charles L. Peterson, in the 81st year of his age. His remains were interred at Hawkesville, on the 21st, by the Rev. Mr. Smith of Berlin, after which funeral discourses in German and English, by attending ministers, were delivered in the Church of the United Brethren. Notwithstanding the extreme severity of the weather, the funeral was most numerously attended, the procession of vehicles containing sympathizing friends and neighbours being nearly a mile in length. The aged and devoted partner of his long life had predeceased him only a few years, and their remains were laid side by side in one grave, united both in the life and death. Mr. Peterson had reached a truly patriarchal age, and up to a few moments of his death he was perfectly concious, possessing all his faculties. He was the honored and beloved head of a numerous race of descendants, prosperous, vigorous and in the prime of life. Three married sons and five wedded daugh-ters, twenty-nine grandsons and grand-daughters, and seven great-great grandchildren, besides numerous collateral connections, all assembled to pay their last tribute of affectionate respect for the beloved head of their House. A yeoman all his days, the many hundred broad acres of his descendants testify to the sure reward of honest toil and industry. His life was that of an honest man and full of the Christian's hope. Death had no terrors for one who was for many years fully prepared for the last great change. A. J. Peterson, Esq., of Berlin, H.W. Peterson and Joseph Peterson, Esqrs. of Wellesley, are his three surviving sons. Our Townsman, H. W. Peterson, Esq. County Crown Attorney, a Nephew of the deceased."

THE GUELPH EVENING MERCURY January 22, 1876. 
Peterson, Charles Lewis (I26907)
 
322 "Pop" Philip, who headed every parade in the city, was probably the most colorful citizen in Kitchener's history. Born in Goderich, he later moved to this city. After rolling cigars and making buggy springs he became intensely interested in the theatre and while acting professionally married Minnie Estrelle, an American stage actress, before the footlights preceding a theatre performance. He brought many stage shows to Berlin and also developed amateur theatricals.

He was a close friend of the late J. Ambrose Small, Toronto millionaire theatre producer, who vanished mysteriously. Philip operated a cigar store, and then leased and operated the Walper Hotel for three years. He bought the Clarendon Hotel across the street and became owner of several movie theatres in Ontario, but never lost his interest in things theatrical. Philip served as alderman for several years and supported the creation of Victoria Park.

Waterloo Region Hall of Fame 2011

_________________

Berliner Journal September 3, 1896 Page 4 Column 2

The new opera house is rapidly nearing completion and next Tuesday and Wednesday will be inaugurated by the Wilbur Opera Company.
building is beautifully and practically organized throughout; the auditorium
measures 56' x 36' and has, together with the large gallery, seating for 800 people; the stage is 24' wide, 27' long and 47' high, including the rooms for scenery.

The illumination is provided by fittings for gas and electric light. The building contract was bestowed on Mr. H. Wildfang, who had subcontracted the masonry work to Mr. George Schlee, the painting to Mr. F. Vetter, and the piping and conduits to Mr. P. Gies. As already announced, the Wilbur Opera Co. will give three performances in Berlin; in addition to the opera, there will be presentations of living pictures, marches, etc. with electrical illumination.


Translated by:Patricia J. Kauk 
Philip, George Odlum "Pop" (I179857)
 
323 "Records indicate that Susannah had a daughter Beatrice and the father was Norman Bowman. Nothing more is known about Norman at this time."

Susannah Bock, ...[Eby 1137] b. 27 Mar 1860 d. 5 Jan 1936 . (2019). Ezraeby.com. Retrieved 9 February 2019, from https://ezraeby.com/getperson.php?personID=I55740&tree=mennonite 
Bricker, Beatrice (I73441)
 
324 "Richard Clive Stauffer was born in Galt on Jan. 2, 1922, the son of Clive Bowman Stauffer and Jean Davidson Aitkin. Mr. Stauffer joined the Highland Light Infantry of Canada in 1940, attaining the rank first of Lieutenant and, later, of Captain. He led his troops in the D-Day landing in Normandy and 4 weeks later was seriously wounded during the successful 12 hour battle for the French town of Buronon July 8, 1944. In 1953 Mr. Stauffer purchased the assets of T. A. Rutherford and Son Fuels and changed the company name to Stauffer Fuels. In 1956 Mr. Stauffer's company amalgamated with Galt Fuel and Supply Co.Ltd. to create Stauffer Quality Fuels Ltd. In 1960 another amalgamation took place, this time with Roos Fuels Company Ltd. to form Stauffer-Roos Fuels which was located at 101 Ainslie St. S. Mr. Stauffer died at Saugeen Memorial Hospital in Southampton on Sept. 22, 1988 and is buried in Mount View Cemetery."

Cambridge Mosaic 
Stauffer, Richard Clive (I268451)
 
325 "Richard Quickfall passed away at his home, 181 Frederick St. this morning. He was born Aug. 21,1916, in this city and was 26 years old.

A member of Zion Evangelical Church, he is survived by his mother, four sisters, the Misses Evelyn and Pearl Quickfall and Mrs. Harold Dakins,all of this city, and Mrs. Arthur Dakins of St. Catharines, and one brother, Clark, of Kitchener, and by three aunts, Mrs. Elias Snider, and the Misses Susan and Angela Shoemaker.".....

KW Record obit. of Mon., Apr. 26, 1943

_________________

"In the account of the death of Richard Quickfall appearing inyesterday's edition, the names of his parents were incorrectly given. He is a s/o Mrs. Quickfall and the late A. C. Quickfall. He is survived by his mother, one brother, Clark of this city, four sisters, the Misses Evelyn and Pearl Quickfall and Mrs. Harold Berlet (Ellen) of this cityand Mrs. Arthur Dahms (Eileen) of St. Catharines."

and correction KW Record Tues., Apr.27, 1943:  
Quickfall, Richard (I200840)
 
326 "Robert John Bean, formerly of R.R.#1 New Hamburg, died in the Nithview Home, New Hamburg, Monday, Nov. 19, 1990 at the age of 98 years. He was born in Wilmot Tp., the son of Isaac Bean and Margaret Gilmar. He was the Secretary-Treasurer of the former S.S.No.5 Wilmot School for many years, and the Chairman of the Waterloo Oxford Secondary School Board. At the time it was built, he turned the first sod. He was the husband of Laura Beatrice Wood of Nithview Home, whom he married Apr. 21, 1920. He was the father of Wallis and his wife Ruth of New Hamburg; Marjorie and her husband Peter Hallman of Cambridge, and Grace and her husband Russell Scott of Kitchener. He was also survived by one sister-in-law, Mrs. Martha Bean of Islington, 10 grandchildren, and 13 great-grandchildren. He was predeceased by three brothers, Alfred, Frederick and Howard, and by one sister, Mrs. Laura Facey.

KWRecord obit, Nov. 1990 
Bean, Robert John (I78711)
 
327 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Robillard, Roger (I224255)
 
328 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Shaver, Ron (I226125)
 
329 "Ruth passed away, peacefully, at the age of 80, on December 26, 2008, due to complications from a rare blood disease. Lovingly remembered by her former husband, Don Erdman and his wife Barbara of Waterloo; daughter, Ginny Ehrlich and husband Tim of Waterloo; sons, Ralph and his partner Evelyn of Kitchener, Michael and his partner Robert of Toronto, and Wayne and his wife Barb of Unionville, and grandchildren, Sarah Erdman, Corey Erdman, Daniel and Ryan Ehrlich. Remembered by her sisters, Dorothy Malleck and Patricia Ziegler of Kitchener; sister-in-law, Lois and her husband Phil Kress of Florida, and many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by her parents, Victor and Hermine (Herz) Moyer. Ruth enjoyed her family, many friends, music, gardening, traveling, reading, and charitable work. The K-W Community Orchestra, her music group Fermata and CAMMAC music camp, as well as volunteering for Out Of The Cold, were dear to her. " ... "In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to St. John's Lutheran Church, K-W Community Orchestra, Luther Manor, or Out Of The Cold would be appreciated by Ruth and her family. ... In living memory of Ruth, a donation will be made by the funeral home to the Trees for Learning Program." Moyer, Ruth Helen (I189255)
 
330 "SCHMITTY" IN TROUBLE.

Albert Smith, a young Berlin musician who is well known in Wellesley, having come here several times with concert companies, has been getting into a peck of trouble over an imprudent matrumonial venture lately. The Berlin News-Record says: - Albert Smith who has married in Galt about a fortnight ago to Mrs. Powley Queen St, Berlin, was arrested, along with is bride, in Galt. They were held on a charge of alleged bigamy and brought to Berlin for trial. William Powley, the elder, and the first husband of the woman under arrest, reached Berlin on Friday, from the Southern States, where he and his son Benjamin have been during the summer and fall. The party reached Berlin safely and were in the hallway leading to the council chamber when Smith saw a chance to escape, suddenly wheeled round, bolted through the open door and cleared the steps at a bound. He was fleet as a hare, and though some chase was given, he succeeded in eluding his pursuers. He carried with him a pair of hand-cuffs. Powley gave bonds for his wife's appearance on Thursday. Smith is not yet caught.

Wellesley Maple Leaf Journal, Jan 17, 1901

Obituary is supplied by the Wellesley Township Heritage and Historical Society Click here to go to their website. 
Smith, Albert (I37821)
 
331 "SHANTZ, Eleanor M. (nee Donaldson) - Peacefully, with her family by her side, at Winston Park Nursing Home on Sun., March 6, 2011. Born in Goderich, daughter of the late Wilfrid and Ella Donaldson. Survived by her daughter Catherine Schoger, son-in-law Gary, son Keith Shantz and daughter-in-law Sheila. Fondly remembered by her grandchildren, Sarah Shantz, Laura Shantz, Heidi Schoger and Stephen Schoger; her brother John Donaldson and sister-in-law Loreen; and her sister Mollie Farrell. Predeceased by her husband of 58 years, Frank Shirk Shantz (2007); daughter Nancy, son Scott, and by sisters Evelyn Stephens, Edith Bates and Clara Robinson. Eleanor was vivacious and full of life. As a child and throughout her life, she was a caring individual to her family, friends and neighbours. Her smile and her infectious sense of humour endeared her to everyone...")

KW Record obit. of Tues., March 8, 2011 
Donalson, Eleanor (I224870)
 
332 "SHANTZ-GIBSON, Feb. 8, Mrs. Esther N. Gibson, Evanston, Illinois, to Dr. Stauffer C. Shantz, Kitchener."

KW Record marriage announcement of Wed., Feb. 11, 1953
 
Nelson, Esther M. (I193904)
 
333 "Sister Tillman was born November 28th, 1848 in St. Agatha, Ontario. Little is known of her early years, however, when she had grown to womanhood, similar to our Venerable Mother Teresa, Sister Tillman and five other young ladies, with the permission and direction of their saintly pastor, resolved to live a community life.
On one occasion our revered Mother Caroline was on visitation to St. Agatha to open a mission. The pastor of this mission begged Mother Caroline to accept these six young ladies as postulants. On August 18th, 1871, our future Sister received her bonnet, and remained in St. Agatha for six months. Going to Milwaukee on Valentine's Day 1872. On May 4th, 1873, our happy postulant received the Wreath of Roses and Lilies, and on August 29th, 1875, Novice Mary Tillman became the thorn-crowned bride of her Divine Spouse. The feast of Our Lady's Assumption (August 15th), 1885, was the day of her final immolation. After temporary vows, Sister was missioned to St. Boniface, Rochester, for one year. From there to St. Joseph's Asylum for another year, hence to Tacony, Philadelphia, where she labored for the little ones of Christ for twelve years.
During the next fifteen years, our dear Sister Tillman told her rosary of kind deeds in the Infirmary at Govanstown, Maryland.
Once more St. Joseph's Asylum, Rochester, became the scene of her labors. And after twelve years, she was transferred to Fourth St, New York City. She remained for seven years until her health necessitated her removal to the Mother House in 1922. Here for another decade of years, our good Sister cheerfully and willingly helped with the bed linen and in the convent sewing department.
Only this past year, the toil-worn fingers of Charitable Sister Tillman buttonholed the necks of four hundred wimples. Surely the generous Heart of Christ, in reward for her charity, day by day, mantled the soul of our beloved Sister with the richest of graces of His Sacred Heart, so that the end of life's day, she would receive His eternal blessing.
Sister Tillman contracted pneumonia; she was fortified by the Last Rites of Holy Mother Church, and was consoled, to the very end, by the oft-repeated blessing and absolution of the Revered Chaplain, and by the untiring prayerful vigil of the Reverend Mother Provincial.
At one o'clock in the afternoon of April 26th, 1933, our Lady of Good Council, herself, guided the last earthly footsteps of Our Venerable Jubilarian, unto the eternal way of life everlasting."


Obituary of Sister Mary Tillman Schmidt, newspaper unknown submitted by Charisse Hake 2012 
Schmidt, Sister Catherine (I219960)
 
334 "Stricken with a heart attack, Mrs. Mary Magdelena Shantz, age 62, of 71 Edna street, died at the Kitchener Waterloo Hospital early this morning. Deceased was born in Waterloo Tp. on Dec. 3, 1876. She was a graduate of Pasadena Hospital, Chicago, Illinois, and a mission worker, trained in the Mennonite church at Goshen, Indiana. Predeceased by her first husband, Henry M. Brubacher, she later married Abram L. Shantz.

Surviving are her husband, one brother, Fred Stauffer of Washington, one sister, Mrs. Jonas Baer of Blair. Two brothers, J. B. Stauffer and Norman Stauffer and one sister, Mrs. Noah Weber, predeceased her...First Mennonite Cemetery...."

KW Record obit. of Tues., Dec. 27, 1938 
Stauffer, Mary Magdalena "Lena" (I123503)
 
335 "The "Burkards" are natives of Switzerland from whence the old progenitor, I Joseph Burkhart, emigrated about the year 1751. He settled among his co-religionists in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. No other information has been received in regard to his birth, death, to whom he was married, nor about his family. All we know is that one of his sons was named Peter." Burkhard, Joseph (I16437)
 
336 "The bakery went out of business during the Depression. As my grandfather was reported to say, "no one has a nickel for a loaf of bread, but they have one for a pint of beer"."

Joan Slover, Facebook 2019 
Berges, Eugene Anthony (I113381)
 
337 "The death of Charles Kunkel, 35, of 101 Borden Ave., occurred at the Toronto General Hospital last night.

The s/o the late Mr. and Mrs. Noah Kunkel, he was born in Breslau. Mr.Kunkel was an employee of the Beaver Furniture Factory and a member of the Olivet Evangelical Church.

Surviving are his wife, the former Alberta Biehn; one son, Kenneth, and one daughter, Joan, both at home. Also surviving are four brothers, Clayton and Eugene, Kitchener; Alfred, London, and Pte. Harold Kunkel of Vancouver Island, B.C.; and one sister, Mrs. Gregory (Ada) Oswald, Bridgeport....Woodland Cemetery."

KW Record obit. of Tues., Oct. 16, 1945 
Kunkel, Charles Jerome (I156429)
 
338 "The death of Henry H.Wagner, 1454 King St. E., occurred today at the KW Hospital, following a brief illness. Deceased was 78 years old, born Sept. 6, 1867 at Erbsville, Ont. He was a s/o the late Mr. and Mrs. Gregor Wagner. Mr.Wagner attended Alma St. United Brethren Church.

Surviving are his wife, nee Lovina Cassel, whom he married at New Dundee on Nov. 15, 1892; one son, Cecil M. Wagner of kitchener; one brother, Emil of Oshawa, and one half-brother, William House of Kitchener. Four grandchildren and five great-grandchildren also survive...Woodland Mausoleum...."

KW Record obit. of Wed., Feb. 27, 1946
 
Wagner, Henry H. (I157942)
 
339 "The death of John Bender, Listowel, occurred at Listowel Memorial Hospital, Thursday, July 1, at the age of 83. A well-known farmer at Wallace Tp. for many years, Mr.Bender retired about 12 years ago and since then has been residing in Listowel. He was born in Germany, May 29,1871, a son of the late George Bender and Regina (Krotz) Bender and came to Canada with his parents at an early age. For many years he farmed in Wallace Tp. and in 1896 he married the former Hannah Biehn. He was a member of the Evangelical United Brethren.

Listowel Banner obit, July 8, 1954 
Bender, John (I246738)
 
340 "The death of Miss Susie Hillgartner, RR2 Petersburg, occurred early this morning at St. Mary's Hospital following a brief illness. She was 77 years old.

Daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hilgartner, she was born in Wilmot Tp. Nov. 28, 1870. Miss Hilgartner attended Wilmot Centre Evangelical Church.

Surviving are two brothers, David Hilgartner of Los Angeles, Calif. and Ephriam Hilgartner of Kitchener, and three sisters, Mrs. James Woefle of Kitchener, Mrs. Charles Siebert of New Dundee and Mrs. William Witzel of Petersburg....Wilmot Centre Cemetery."

KW Record obit. of Thurs., Apr. 1, 1948 
Hillgartner, Susanna "Susie" (I280537)
 
341 "The death of Mrs. Sidney Weber occurred at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Clarence Shuh, near Elmira, Sat. at the age of 79 years. Mrs. Weber had been in ill health for some weeks.

Before her marriage Mrs. Weber was Caroline Wanner. A d/o the late Mr.and Mrs. Christian Wanner, she was born Feb. 14, 1867 in Peel Tp. and lived in the district her entire life. She attended the Elmira Mennonite Church. Mr. and Mrs. Weber were married in 1891.

Mrs. Weber is survived by her husband, one son, Wellington of Simcoe, two daughters, Mrs. Clarence (Nellie) Shuh, near Elmira, and Mrs. Ephraim (Edith) Bowman, Ravendale, Sask., one brother, Hiram Wanner, Calgary, Alta., two sisters, Mrs. Israel Weber and Miss Sarah Wanner, both of Elmira, and four grandchildren. Three brothers and one sister predeceased her...."

KW Record obit. of Mon., Apr. 15, 1946 
Wanner, Caroline (I17981)
 
342 "The death of Russell S.Shantz, Mannheim road, near Kitchener, occurred early this morning at the Galt General Hospital after a brief illness. Mr. Shantz was 27 years of age. He was born in Waterloo Tp. and was engaged in farming. He was an active member of Sterling Ave. Mennonite Church.

The late Mr. Shantz is survived by his mother, Mrs. Catherine Shantz, three brothers, Mervin of Alma and Edward and Frank Shantz of Kitchener, and by three sisters, Mrs. Marshall Bingeman and Mrs. Maxwell Becker of Kitchener and Miss Anna Shantz of Galt..."

KW Record obit. of Tues., Apr. 22, 1941 
Shantz, Russell Shirk (I298202)
 
343 "The death took place in Dashwood on February 11th of Mrs. Phillipine Willert at the age of 88 years and 5 months.

"The deceased was born in Petersheim, Bavaria, Germany on August 24, 1827. She came to New Hamburg in the late forties. She was married in 1848 to the late Henry Grube. They resided here for several years, and from there went to East Zorra (near Tavistock), where they lived for many years, and from there went to Logan Town-ship. After forty six years of married life, she was left a widow (1894) and two years later (1896) married Christian Willert of Dashwood, who predeceased her eleven years ago. The deceased was a sister of the late Jakob Ritz of this town.

"She leaves a family of twelve children, two sons and ten daughters; one daughter, Mrs. Seebach of Logan having died six years ago. The children are•; Mrs. J. Hoffmeister of Gettingen, Germany; Mrs. John S. Wilhelm, and Mrs. Wm: Brandt, Wilmot; Mrs. G. Schmidt, Elmira; Mrs. V. Schaefer, New Hamburg; Mrs. A. Schrag, Toronto; Henry Grube, Berlin; Mrs. F. Kneisel, Detroit, Michigan; Mrs. P. Hollinger, Clifford; William Grube, Logan; Mrs. A. Willert, Michigan; and Mrs. L. Willert, Dashwood, Ontario. "The funeral took place on Monday afternoon in Logan Township." 
Rietz, Philipine (I27199)
 
344 "The families of the following persons also came out together by the 'Sarah Mary Ann,' of Maryport**, England, in April 1831: George Landreth, James Bunyan, Thomas Adams, John Kerr, David Brown, Adam Kersell, Robert Cranston, James and Walter Deans, John, Thomas and William Henderson, John and William Veitch, Robert Laidlaw (father of James Laidlaw M.P.P.), Paisley Block; James Little and Robert Aitkin, Blue Lake, and James Davidson, Keg Lane, near Paris. With possibly one exception, all these families were from Roxburghshire, Scotland. Voyage \endash five weeks and four days.


Young, The Hon. James M. Reminiscences of the Early History of Galt and the Settlement of North Dumfries . Toronto: Hunter, Rose and Company, 1880; footnotes, pgs 60-61)

______________________________


A-1-78 George Laudreth Probate of the Will of George Laudreth, late of the Village of Galt, granted the Seventh day of November 1855, on the Petition of James Bury? John Gillespie and George Barrie Jr. Executors named in said Will (Andrew Ramsay having refused to act): -

I George Laudreth of the Township of Dumfries, Yeoman…I give and bequeath at my death to my beloved wife Margreat B. Laudreth an annuity of Twenty five pounds currency payable on the first day of January, yearly; and further I will and bequeath unto my second son Andrew Laudreth all my Freehold property and tenements etc, situated and being in the Township of North Dumfries in the 13 concession of the said Township, containing two hundred acres more or less and also I bequeath to my son Andrew Laudreth a lot of land being and lying in the Eleventh concession of the same Township of North Dumfries, containing 24 acres more or less and may be known as described by deed of the same, all the above property. I will and give unto my son Andrew Laudreth to his heirs and assigns forever..,.provided that my son Andrew shall well and truly pay unto his mother the above sum and in addition to the above sum he shall build his mother a comfortable cottage on the farm with a rood of ground for a garden if she wish to have it and also to keep a cow for her and also to provide for her yearly, a sufficient quantity of firewood made ready for the stove and also 12 bushels of potatoes yearly, and also that my wife shall have the use of all my household furniture as long as she lives with all the above annuities provided only that she remains a widow. And also I will and bequeath unto my other children as follows. I bequeath to my oldest George Laudreth the sum of three hundred pounds and also I will and bequeath until my third son James Laundreth the sum of three hundred pounds, and also I will and bequeath to my youngest son John Laudreth the sum of three hundred pounds. I also will and bequeath to my daughter Margreat the sum of three hundred pounds all of which sum to be well and truly paid to them in manor following: That two years after my death my son Andrew shall pay unto each of his brothers and sisters one fourth part of the above sum awarded to them and also to pay to them one every second year thereafter the like sum until there portions are all paid up in full. And also that at my death that any property that I may have, such as horses or carriages of any kind, that they shall be sold and the proceeds given to my wife. [After debts and expenses are paid, the residue] should be equally divided between my wife and children, George, James, John and Margreath. I also bequeath to my daughter Margreat the sofa and the eight day clock and the best china table but that my wife is to [have] the use of them as she lives and that my wife shall have the power to dispose of any furniture amongst her children as she may think proper at any time. I appoint my friend James Burgess? And John Gillespie and George Barrie Jr and Andrew Ramsay Tailor of Galt all of North Dumfries to be the only Executors of this my Last Will and Testament.

Witnessed by Andrew Ramsay and George Cowan
Will Dated 29 May 1855
Proved 7 Nov 1855
Inventory £25/-
Died 31 Aug 1855

Surrogate Court Records Copybook Register A 1853-1871 transcript to 1863. Frances Hoffman transcriber.

 
Landreth, George (I49772)
 
345 "The families of the following persons also came out together by the 'Sarah Mary Ann,' of Maryport**, England, in April 1831: George Landreth, James Bunyan, Thomas Adams, John Kerr, David Brown, Adam Kersell, Robert Cranston, James and Walter Deans, John, Thomas and William Henderson, John and William Veitch, Robert Laidlaw (father of James Laidlaw M.P.P.), Paisley Block; James Little and Robert Aitkin, Blue Lake, and James Davidson, Keg Lane, near Paris. With possibly one exception, all these families were from Roxburghshire, Scotland. Voyage - five weeks and four days.


Young, The Hon. James M. Reminiscences of the Early History of Galt and the Settlement of North Dumfries . Toronto: Hunter, Rose and Company, 1880; footnotes, pgs 60-61)

_________________

Died, On Sabbath afternoon, the 26th inst., at 5 o'clock, John Kerr, Aged 79 years. You are respectfully requested to attend the Funeral to-morrow, Tuesday, the 28th inst., at 2 o'clock, p.m., from his late residence, Lot 29, 10th Con. , N. Dumfries, to the place of interment, Cedar Creek Burying Ground. North Dumfries, April 27th, 1874.

Funeral Card 
Kerr, John (I275980)
 
346 "The families of the following persons also came out together by the 'Sarah Mary Ann,' of Maryport**, England, in April 1831: George Landreth, James Bunyan, Thomas Adams, John Kerr, David Brown, Adam Kersell, Robert Cranston, James and Walter Deans, John, Thomas and William Henderson, John and William Veitch, Robert Laidlaw (father of James Laidlaw M.P.P.), Paisley Block; James Little and Robert Aitkin, Blue Lake, and James Davidson, Keg Lane, near Paris. With possibly one exception, all these families were from Roxburghshire, Scotland. Voyage - five weeks and four days.


Young, The Hon. James M. Reminiscences of the Early History of Galt and the Settlement of North Dumfries . Toronto: Hunter, Rose and Company, 1880; footnotes, pgs 60-61)  
Kersell, Adam (I127770)
 
347 "The families of the following persons also came out together by the 'Sarah Mary Ann,' of Maryport, England, in April 1831: George Landreth, James Bunyan, Thomas Adams, John Kerr, David Brown, Adam Kersell, Robert Cranston, James and Walter Deans, John, Thomas and William Henderson, John and William Veitch, Robert Laidlaw (father of James Laidlaw M.P.P.), Paisley Block; James Little and Robert Aitkin, Blue Lake, and James Davidson, Keg Lane, near Paris. With possibly one exception, all these families were from Roxburghshire, Scotland. Voyage - five weeks and four days.


Young, The Hon. James M. Reminiscences of the Early History of Galt and the Settlement of North Dumfries . Toronto: Hunter, Rose and Company, 1880; footnotes, pgs 60-61)  
Cranston, Robert (I42718)
 
348 "The families of the following persons also came out together by the 'Sarah Mary Ann,' of Maryport, England, in April 1831: George Landreth, James Bunyan, Thomas Adams, John Kerr, David Brown, Adam Kersell, Robert Cranston, James and Walter Deans, John, Thomas and William Henderson, John and William Veitch, Robert Laidlaw (father of James Laidlaw M.P.P.), Paisley Block; James Little and Robert Aitkin, Blue Lake, and James Davidson, Keg Lane, near Paris. With possibly one exception, all these families were from Roxburghshire, Scotland. Voyage - five weeks and four days.


Young, The Hon. James M. Reminiscences of the Early History of Galt and the Settlement of North Dumfries . Toronto: Hunter, Rose and Company, 1880; footnotes, pgs 60-61)  
Deans, James (I135026)
 
349 "The families of the following persons also came out together by the 'Sarah Mary Ann,' of Maryport, England, in April 1831: George Landreth, James Bunyan, Thomas Adams, John Kerr, David Brown, Adam Kersell, Robert Cranston, James and Walter Deans, John, Thomas and William Henderson, John and William Veitch, Robert Laidlaw (father of James Laidlaw M.P.P.), Paisley Block; James Little and Robert Aitkin, Blue Lake, and James Davidson, Keg Lane, near Paris. With possibly one exception, all these families were from Roxburghshire, Scotland. Voyage - five weeks and four days.

Young, The Hon. James M. Reminiscences of the Early History of Galt and the Settlement of North Dumfries . Toronto: Hunter, Rose and Company, 1880; footnotes, pgs 60-61)

________________________

Away - Mr. Walter Deans, a very old resident of North Dumfries, but for the last few years residing in Galt, passed away on Monday morning last, in his 86th year. The deceased came to Canada in 1833, in company with his mother and four sisters to join his brother who had gone out as a pioneer to the new world the year before. Walter, then a young man in the prime of life, took up land in the 8th concession, about six miles from Galt - the farm now occupied by his son Mr. Thos. S. Deans - and there he fought the usual settlers battle till old age found him with a modest competence. Last year he was stricken with paralysis, and since the few months of life left him have been passed in pain and suffering. He was the first of the family of six who has been called away, viz.: - Mr. James Deans and Mrs. Aikens, of Galt, Mrs. Johnson, Michigan, Mrs. Slater, of near Seaforth, and Miss Deans, of Berlin. Besides his son, Mr. Thos. S. Deans, the deceased leaves two daughters, Mrs. Jackling, Listowel, and Miss Deans, who resided with hm. His other daughter, Mrs. James Nichol, followed the fortunes of her husband to Nevada, and there died.

Galt Reporter Feb 8 1889 pg 1 
Deans, Walter (I122642)
 
350 "The families of the following persons also came out together by the 'Sarah Mary Ann,' of Maryport, England, in April 1831: George Landreth, James Bunyan, Thomas Adams, John Kerr, David Brown, Adam Kersell, Robert Cranston, James and Walter Deans, John, Thomas and William Henderson, John and William Veitch, Robert Laidlaw (father of James Laidlaw M.P.P.), Paisley Block; James Little and Robert Aitkin, Blue Lake, and James Davidson, Keg Lane, near Paris. With possibly one exception, all these families were from Roxburghshire, Scotland. Voyage - five weeks and four days.

Young, The Hon. James M. Reminiscences of the Early History of Galt and the Settlement of North Dumfries . Toronto: Hunter, Rose and Company, 1880; footnotes, pgs 60-61)


________________________

Died, In North Dumfries, on Monday, July 29th, 1889, at 5 o'clock p.m., Thomas Henderson, Sr., Aged 92 Years, 11 Months and 17 Days. The Funeral Will take place from his late residence, Lot No. 30, 11th Concession, N. Dumfries, on Wednesday, at 3 o'clock, to Cedar Creek Cemetery. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend. Ayr, July 30th, 1889.

Waterloo Historical Society Death Notices Collection - photocopies

_____________________________________

A Pioneer Gone:

The passing at his home on Concession 11, North Dumfries, on Monday last, one who has been known in this vicinity for more than fifty - eight years. Thomas Henderson was born on the farm known as Abbot-Ruel in Roxburghshire, Scotland. In January 1829, at the age of 33 years, he married Miss Janet Henderson, who, though of the same name, was not a blood-relation. Of this union were born twelve children, eight of whom are still living. In the year 1831, Mr. and Mrs. Henderson came to Canada to make their home. On May 26th of that year they arrived in Galt, which was then a small village. Shortly afterwards they moved to the farm now occupied by Mr. R. Cochrane, North Dumfries. Remaining there a short time they next took the farm now in the possession of Mr. Wm. Morton, whence they went to the farm where Mr. Henderson ended his days, Lot 30, 11th Concession, settling there April 2nd 1842. Amongst those who came to this country about the same time as the deceased was his brother John Henderson; Thomas Adams, who served under Lord Nelson; James Davidson of Keg Lane; Robert Cranston; David Brown; John Kerr and John Mathison. Of these, we are informed that the first four named came in the same vessel with him. All have passed over to the great majority, some of them being laid to rest many years ago. So far as is known Mr. Henderson was the last remaining of the heroic old pioneers of North Dumfries, who endured much hardship and many privations that they might leave to those following, the fair heritage they now possess. All honour to such man, the memories of whose noble deeds cannot be too highly cherished by their descendants. Some 15 years ago Mr. Henderson gave up the management of the farm, his son John, with whom he has since resided, succeeding him. up to within five days of his death, he was able to move about the house, although the once robust form had failed. He has attained the patriarchal age of 93 years. His aged partner in life's joys and sorrows has the sympathy of a large circles of relatives and friends. Although 83, Mrs. Henderson is yet quite active and so lightly has time passed over her that she retains the natural colour of her hair much more than some of their children. Thier surviving children are Mrs. Chas. Rodgers of Wawanash Township, William of Ayr; James of Reidsville; Mrs. T. Mathison, of Strasburg; Thomas C., of Ayr; Mrs. James Henry, of Egremont Township; John, on the homestead and Robert E. living on Concession 10, North Dumfries. The funeral, which took place on Wednesday, to Cedar Creek cemetery was largely attended.

The Ayr Record 1 Aug 1889 
Henderson, Thomas (I131019)
 
351 "The first telephone was built in 1911 by John Ernst.....In 1922 the company was sold to the township with Ilingworth Cassel, Gideon Bechtel and Edwin Eidt being the first Commissioners."

More Than a Century in Wilmot

_________



 
Cassel, Illingworth Mark (I78573)
 
352 "The Frasers of Stratherrick, where are they?" To this pensive question by Charles Fraser Mackintosh comes an oft echoed and lusty answer from many distant lands. Indeed the question is, "Where are they not?" for it is safe to say that there is no country where the English language to-day prevails, in which Stratherrick may not claim a son. Their new homes have not the historical charm of the old, but wherever the Frasers have gone, away from the home of their fathers, they have acquitted themselves well. A scion of a Stratherrick house was James George Fraser, who many years ago settled at Galt, Ontario. Like his brother Capt. Charles Fraser, now residing in Glasgow, Scotland, he was attached to a Highland regiment in his younger days, but withdrawing from the service, he came to Canada with his young wife, Christina MacLeod. At Galt was born a family of three sons, William, Charles and Andrew, and four daughters, Christina, Jessie, Elizabeth and Georgina, the youngest of whom is the subject of this brief sketch. On the maternal side her descent is traced from the families of Lochend and Braemore. Her great-grand parents were George Mackenzie, second son of John Mackenzie I. of Lochend (of the Gairloch family), and Christina, daughter of Captain Hector Munro of Braemore. George Mackenzie was a distinguished officer, and attained to the rank of Lieut.-Colonel of the famous Rosshire Buffs, the 78th Highlanders. His daughter Christina married Angus MacLeod of Banff with issue, two sons, Donald and George, and several daughters,[Pg 95] of whom Christina, as already stated, married James G. Fraser of Galt, Ontario.

Georgina Fraser was born about the beginning of the sixties, and was educated in the public and high schools of her native town. After the death of her parents she removed to Toronto, and taking up the study of shorthand entered upon the life of an amanuensis and teacher of stenography. She taught large classes in the towns surrounding Toronto, and in Victoria University, when that institution was located at Cobourg. She was the first woman in Canada to adopt this profession as a means of self-support, and to her belongs the honor of adding a new vocation to those upon which Canadian women may enter. In addition to these duties Miss Fraser undertook journalistic work, and was the first lady writer in Toronto to conduct the department devoted to woman's interests, now so important a weekly feature in the great dailies in Canada.

In 1884, while occupying the important position of Assistant Secretary to General Manager Oakes of the Northern Pacific Railway at St. Paul, Minn., she became the wife of Mr. E. P. Newhall, of the Pacific Express Co. in Omaha.

Notwithstanding household cares and ill-health Mrs. Newhall still finds time to indulge in her old taste for literature, wielding an earnest pen in advocacy of those reforms which most interest women of advanced thought. She has achieved considerable fame as a writer of short stories, and her compositions of verse bear the mark of the true poet's touch.

As a clanswoman Mrs. Newhall is fond of claiming the right to call herself a "black" Fraser, nature having endowed her with that darkness of hair and eyebrow which is supposed to stamp all the possessors thereof as "true Frasers."


The Project Gutenberg eBook of "The Clan Fraser in Canada: Souvenir of the First Annual Gathering Toronto, May 5th, 1894", by Alexander Fraser. . (2020). Retrieved 29 March 2020, from https://www.gutenberg.org/files/37340/37340-h/37340-h.htm 
Fraser, Georgina (I132384)
 
353 "The Germania House". Built in 1863-64 by Christian Pabst and operated by him until 1886. Next by Eugene Sullivan till 1888; by John Andrich, 1889, and by Frank Jaglowitz until 1891 when its license was discontinued.


Le Rue De Commerce, Other Times Other Customs Other Days Other Ways, Winfield Brewster 1954 
Sullivan, Eugene (I126423)
 
354 "The Heimler's were noted tailors in the greater Wellesley area...and Susanna followed in those footsteps as a tailor."

email Robert W Mayer 2018 
Mayer, Susanna (I108125)
 
355 "The Hespeler Hotel" built in 1847 by Charles Siegle who operated it till 1858

Le Rue De Commerce, Other Times Other Customs Other Days Other Ways, Winfield Brewster 1954 
Siegle, Carl Frederick "Charles" (I119113)
 
356 "The Hespeler Hotel" built in 1847 by Charles Siegle who operated it till 1858; then came William Baker until his death in 1868; next James Baker till 1873; Mrs. E. M. Baker, widow of William in 1874 and her son, Oliver till 1879.


Le Rue De Commerce, Other Times Other Customs Other Days Other Ways, Winfield Brewster 1954 
Springer, Ellen (I118732)
 
357 "The Hespeler Hotel" built in 1847 by Charles Siegle who operated it till 1858; then came William Baker until his death in 1868; next James Baker till 1873; Mrs. E. M. Baker, widow of William in 1874 and her son, Oliver till 1879.


Le Rue De Commerce, Other Times Other Customs Other Days Other Ways, Winfield Brewster 1954 
Baker, William (I118733)
 
358 "The Hespeler Hotel" built in 1847 by Charles Siegle who operated it till 1858; then came William Baker until his death in 1868; next James Baker till 1873; Mrs. E. M. Baker, widow of William in 1874 and her son, Oliver till 1879. Came then James Atkinson till 1882 and again Oliver Baker till 1886


Le Rue De Commerce, Other Times Other Customs Other Days Other Ways, Winfield Brewster 1954

_______________________


Baker, O. F., proprietor of Commercial Hotel. Born at Waterdown, Wentworth County, Ont., 1855.

Illustrated Atlas of the County of Waterloo, H. Parsel & Co., Toronto - 1881 (Village of New Hespeler entries)  
Baker, Oliver F. (I65697)
 
359 "The Hespeler Hotel" built in 1847 by Charles Siegle who operated it till 1858; then came William Baker until his death in 1868; next James Baker till 1873; Mrs. E. M. Baker, widow of William in 1874 and her son, Oliver till 1879. Came then James Atkinson till 1882 and again Oliver Baker till 1886


Le Rue De Commerce, Other Times Other Customs Other Days Other Ways, Winfield Brewster 1954 
Atkinson, James (I58987)
 
360 "The late Mr. Zurbrigg was born in Wilmot Township. He resided for some time in South Easthope Township and then moved to Zurbrigg's corners where he carried on a blacksmithing business and chopping mill and later purchased the adjoining farm."

Waterloo Chronicle, May 28, 1925 
Zurbrigg, Samuel H. (I78620)
 
361 "The Lawn", Irving-Warnock House stone, built 1850s (now Coutts Funeral Home) Cambridge, St. Andrews St. 0096 - stone house - "The Lawn" Irving Warnock House (I1442)
 
362 "The New Hamburg Women's Institute was organized Nov. 29, 1921, by Miss Emily Guest of the Women's Institute Branch of the Dept. of Agriculture, Toronto, and Mrs. I. M. Cassell, District President of South Waterloo Women's Institute at that time. Twenty-two ladies were present at the organization meeting....."

More Than a Century in Wilmot
 
McCallum, Christina "Tina" (I196047)
 
363 "The Pannebeckers (To have a complete history of the Pannebecker family, write to Mr. Samuel W. Pennypacker, Philadelphia, Pa., and get the book, "Historical and Biographical Sketches of the Pannebeckers", edited by Pennybecker. It is well worth the money and one of the most complete works of its kind in existence) were of the first settlers of German origin who settled in Pennsylvania over two hundred years ago. We find them to have been a prominent family in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania as early as 1709."

Cornelius Pannebecker, "a native of Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, was born December 8th, 1770. In April, 1792, he was married to Anna Dettweiler, sister to old Rudolph Dettweiler who resided near the Wanner Meeting House at Hespeler. She was born November 16th, 1775, and died October 27th, 1855. In 1810 they, in company with Christian Shantz and family, Jacob Shantz and wife, and others, moved to Canada and settled in Waterloo County, Ontario, near the present village of Hespeler, on the farm now occupied by Peter Wier. Here they resided until their deaths. He died June 22nd, 1855. To then was born a family of thirteen children"


Eby, Ezra E. (1895). A biographical history of Waterloo township and other townships of the county: being a history of the early settlers and their descendants, mostly all of Pennsylvania Dutch origin: as also much other unpublished historical information chiefly of a local character. Berlin [Kitchener, Ont.]: [s.n.].

____________________

About the year 1822, Joseph Oberholtzer, a sawyer, and Cornelius Pannabecker, a blacksmith, both sound men, had come to the conclusion that, having regard to the fact that so many new buildings were being put up by the settlers, a saw mill in this locality would pay.

In 1823, Joseph Oberholtzer bought from Christian Strome (Strohm) 24 acres of land lying both sides of the River Speed at some distance below the present D. W. & W. Buildings and on it they erected a small saw mill building, installed sawing machinery and built a dam on the Speed to furnish power to operate it.

After it had been in operation for a time they discovered to their sorrow that their mill was not big enough to handle the huge logs the farmers were hauling in to be sawn, and so, later, when their frail dam went out in a flood it was not replaced; They salvaged what they could and wrote off the rest to profit and loss. They had made the mistake of building too small and they paid the shot.


Le Rue De Commerce, Other Times Other Customs Other Days Other Ways, Winfield Brewster 1954

__________________________

Unwilling participants in the War of 1812
About 20 Mennonite men were conscripted to haul supplies for an 1813 engagement


...No one was exempt from non-combatant duties, although some resisted at times. Some were fined heavily in court. Cornelius Pannebecker removed the wheels from his wagon to save it, although his horse and son were still conscripted. Elizabeth (Gabel) Bechtel was threatened at sword-point by an officer who knew she was hiding oxen, which he sought for a massive-scale transport operation to the Detroit River.3a

3aWaterloo Region Region 23 Jun 2012 Jonathan Seiling

_________________________________

About the year 1840, the third saw-mill in New Hope was erected. It was located just below the Forbes Mill site by a partnership composed of another great-grandfather of the write, the late Cornelius Pannebecker, and one Joseph Oberholtzer, whose sister was married to Bergy.

Cornelius Pannebecker arrived from Montgomery County, Pa. in 1810 and was the son of a Mennonite minister who lived on the Schuylkill River at the present site of Spring City. Joseph Oberholtzer was evidently a native of the same county in Pennsylvania and located here probably in 1826 and information in hand also points to his having been the son of a Mennonite preacher. The family was of Swiss descent, while Pannebecker was descended from a Dutch family which had migrated for a few years into Germany about Kriegaheim near Worms, before participating in the exodus of Quakers and Mennonites to Pennsylvania, about the year 1700.

It would appear that Bergy's first saw-mill was too far up the river and the partnership mill too far downstream to quite meet the tastes or requirements of the times, for within a few years Cornelius Oberholtzer erected the fourth saw-mill about midway between these two points, and with it a small foundry or shop, probably for mill repairs etc. Some particulars of this fourth mill are available.

It continued in operation until sometime in 1864, although it evidently changed ownership, September 27th, 1863, to a partnership composed of George Randall, then of Berlin, Herbert M. Farr of Waterloo and Shubel H. Randall of New Hampshire, the purchase price according to the Galt Reporter files of that time being $8,000. The old mill was used to saw the timber and lumber for the Randall-Farr Woolen Mills, two stone structures erected in 1864, but as the saw-carriage had capacity only for logs up to 16 feet in length, the large timbers for the new Woolen Mills had to be hewn and were not sawn. It had been said with perhaps some little exaggeration, that the process of sawing logs of large diameter with the vertically operated drag-saw then in use was so slow that the operator after starting to log, had time to walk up town a half mile or more to the hotel, for liquid refreshments and return before the cut was finished.

The timbers of white-pine, taken out of this Oberholtzer mill when the woolen-mill buildings crowded it out of its place were used in the construction of the Lewis Kribs saw-mills which in 1865 were located close to the old public school site. When Mr. W. A. Kribs erected his present manufacturing buildings alongside the G. T. R. lines in 1902, these same old timbers were for the third time used and are at the time of writing, as sound as when first used in 1840.


Tenth Annual Report of the Waterloo Historical Society, 1922, pages 213 - 224. 
Pannebecker, Cornelius (I9867)
 
364 "The progenitor of this family, Christian Burkholder, [Ezra Eby in correctly identifies him as Christian but in fact was Ulrich] was a native of Switzerland. He was born about the year 1707, and even in his young days became a strong advocate of the 'Non-conformist' principles of religion. Finding the opposition of the 'Church Party' becoming too strong, he mediated of moving with his family to the 'Land of the Free' (America), but ere the appointed time of leaving their native country came, he took sick and died. Shortly before his death he advised his wife and children to emigrate from Switzerland and proceed to America where they might settle with their countrymen and, better still, with their co-religionists, the Mennonites. Soon after her husband's death, which took place in March, 1755, the widow with her family of six children, three sons and three daughters, set sail for America and landed at Philadelphia, in July, 1755. She settled in Lancaster County where she died in 1789. The names of her six children whom she brought to America are II Christian, II Peter, II Ulrich, II Mary, II Anna, and II Veronica."


Eby, Ezra E. (1895). A biographical history of Waterloo township and other townships of the county: being a history of the early settlers and their descendants, mostly all of Pennsylvania Dutch origin: as also much other unpublished historical information chiefly of a local character. Berlin [Kitchener, Ont.]: [s.n.].

_______________

Bishop Christian Burkholder and his Swiss Familyrevises the story of Christian Burkhalter, an early, well known, Mennonite bishop in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. These web pages show two of the key, primary sources for this revised story and two of the ancestral Burkhalter homes in Switzerland.

In 1754, when Bishop Christian was eight years old, he immigrated to Pennsylvania with his widowed mother and five siblings. For many years, he was believed to be the son of Christian Burkhalter of Gerolsheim, Germany and the grandson of Mennonite minister Hans Burkhalter. In 1759 this Christian of Gerolsheim, his wife Gertrude, and their four children, were listed among the six Mennonite families still living in Gerolsheim. Bishop Christian immigrated in 1754, and his father died before the immigration. Therefore, he cannot be a son of the Christian alive in Gerolsheim in 1759.

In 1980 Bishop Christian's Martyrs' Mirror was discovered after being lost for more than a century. He had written his family record in this book in his own hand, listing the names of his siblings and their birth years. In the 1990s the names and ages in this family record were matched with those in a 1745 census record found in Switzerland. (1 p18)

Romaine Stauffer, "Bishop Christian Burkholder and His Swiss Family" in Pennsylvania Mennonite Heritage, Vol. 34, No. 3 (Lancaster Mennonite Historical Society, 2011 Jul) 
Burkholder, Ulrich (I16483)
 
365 "The Queens". On a plan dated 1846 the corner lot at Queen and Guelph Road is shown as "The Tavern Lot" which suggests that there was then an hotel either in building or in operation. I am lacking in its earliest history.

Stephen Flynn kept Hotel there 1866-68; Michael Haller, 1868-71; John Fields, 1872-73; James Baker, 1874-86; then came the Waypers, father and son, and after them, Albert E. Thomson and then again by Joseph Wayper Jr. After "Josh" died the hotel was operated for a time by his widow and her second husband, Archie Smith. During the time of The Ontario Temperance Act, Mr. George D. Forbes bought the hotel and refurnished it and Henry Sachs managed it.

After Mr. Forbes died, George Thorlby rented the hotel and then it was sold to James Sutherland Cornell, by him to Joseph Krempowich who in turn sold to Samuel Sturman, the present owner.


Le Rue De Commerce, Other Times Other Customs Other Days Other Ways, Winfield Brewster 1954 
Wayper, Joseph (I35472)
 
366 "The Queens". On a plan dated 1846 the corner lot at Queen and Guelph Road is shown as "The Tavern Lot" which suggests that there was then an hotel either in building or in operation. I am lacking in its earliest history.

Stephen Flynn kept Hotel there 1866-68; Michael Haller, 1868-71; John Fields, 1872-73; James Baker, 1874-86; then came the Waypers, father and son, and after them, Albert E. Thomson and then again by Joseph Wayper Jr. After "Josh" died the hotel was operated for a time by his widow and her second husband, Archie Smith. During the time of The Ontario Temperance Act, Mr. George D. Forbes bought the hotel and refurnished it and Henry Sachs managed it.

After Mr. Forbes died, George Thorlby rented the hotel and then it was sold to James Sutherland Cornell, by him to Joseph Krempowich who in turn sold to Samuel Sturman, the present owner.


Le Rue De Commerce, Other Times Other Customs Other Days Other Ways, Winfield Brewster 1954

______________

In 1882 Edward Roos bought the lot which Charlton and Hurst now own and on the front portion now torn down, built a barn with dwelling above which his family occupied for years; and in rear of this barn he built a stable to hold about twenty horses. In addition to the driving horses kept for hire, Mr. Roos kept a cab which he turned out at weddings, etc. behind a fine well-dressed, well-groomed pair of horses driven by a man equipped always with a silk hat. He had a carryall for summer use, which the ball team hired to make their out-of-town trips, picnic parties hired to go to the lake, etc. and for winter he had his pleasure sleigh which accommodated a goodly number out for a sleigh ride.

He always kept a couple of teams for hauling sand, stone, gravel and coal from the Grand Trunk to the Lower Mill, for movings and the rest of it, and taken together, Ed's revenues were sufficient to make him some money. As far as his single rigs were concerned one had to speak a week or two ahead to be sure of one to take the girl friend to some big dance, to the Aberfoyle Show, or other soul-stirring such-like events.

Ed. Roos sold out to William O. Vanatter in 1893 and embarked in the Hotel business at St. George. In 1898 Van. sold out to Henry Sachs and Alex Roos who conducted the business under style: "Sachs & Roos" and they in turn sold about 1909 to Charles Haas, V.S., and John Sudden who carried on as "Haas and Sudden" until Dr. Haas left not long afterwards; and John Sudden continued for several years and then disposed of the property to Len. Evans and went to Galt.


Le Rue De Commerce, Other Times Other Customs Other Days Other Ways, Winfield Brewster 1954 
Sachs, Henry (I83648)
 
367 "The Queens". On a plan dated 1846 the corner lot at Queen and Guelph Road is shown as "The Tavern Lot" which suggests that there was then an hotel either in building or in operation. I am lacking in its earliest history.

Stephen Flynn kept Hotel there 1866-68; Michael Haller, 1868-71; John Fields, 1872-73; James Baker, 1874-86; then came the Waypers, father and son, and after them, Albert E. Thomson and then again by Joseph Wayper Jr. After "Josh" died the hotel was operated for a time by his widow and her second husband, Archie Smith. During the time of The Ontario Temperance Act, Mr. George D. Forbes bought the hotel and refurnished it and Henry Sachs managed it.

After Mr. Forbes died, George Thorlby rented the hotel and then it was sold to James Sutherland Cornell, by him to Joseph Krempowich who in turn sold to Samuel Sturman, the present owner.


Le Rue De Commerce, Other Times Other Customs Other Days Other Ways, Winfield Brewster 1954 
Flynn, Stephen (I84109)
 
368 "The Queens". On a plan dated 1846 the corner lot at Queen and Guelph Road is shown as "The Tavern Lot" which suggests that there was then an hotel either in building or in operation. I am lacking in its earliest history.

Stephen Flynn kept Hotel there 1866-68; Michael Haller, 1868-71; John Fields, 1872-73; James Baker, 1874-86; then came the Waypers, father and son, and after them, Albert E. Thomson and then again by Joseph Wayper Jr. After "Josh" died the hotel was operated for a time by his widow and her second husband, Archie Smith. During the time of The Ontario Temperance Act, Mr. George D. Forbes bought the hotel and refurnished it and Henry Sachs managed it.

After Mr. Forbes died, George Thorlby rented the hotel and then it was sold to James Sutherland Cornell, by him to Joseph Krempowich who in turn sold to Samuel Sturman, the present owner.


Le Rue De Commerce, Other Times Other Customs Other Days Other Ways, Winfield Brewster 1954 
Haller, Michael (I102079)
 
369 "The Queens". On a plan dated 1846 the corner lot at Queen and Guelph Road is shown as "The Tavern Lot" which suggests that there was then an hotel either in building or in operation. I am lacking in its earliest history.

Stephen Flynn kept Hotel there 1866-68; Michael Haller, 1868-71; John Fields, 1872-73; James Baker, 1874-86; then came the Waypers, father and son, and after them, Albert E. Thomson and then again by Joseph Wayper Jr. After "Josh" died the hotel was operated for a time by his widow and her second husband, Archie Smith. During the time of The Ontario Temperance Act, Mr. George D. Forbes bought the hotel and refurnished it and Henry Sachs managed it.

After Mr. Forbes died, George Thorlby rented the hotel and then it was sold to James Sutherland Cornell, by him to Joseph Krempowich who in turn sold to Samuel Sturman, the present owner.

Le Rue De Commerce, Other Times Other Customs Other Days Other Ways, Winfield Brewster 1954  
Smith, Archibald Bryon "Archie" (I68616)
 
370 "The Queens". On a plan dated 1846 the corner lot at Queen and Guelph Road is shown as "The Tavern Lot" which suggests that there was then an hotel either in building or in operation. I am lacking in its earliest history.

Stephen Flynn kept Hotel there 1866-68; Michael Haller, 1868-71; John Fields, 1872-73; James Baker, 1874-86; then came the Waypers, father and son, and after them, Albert E. Thomson and then again by Joseph Wayper Jr. After "Josh" died the hotel was operated for a time by his widow and her second husband, Archie Smith. During the time of The Ontario Temperance Act, Mr. George D. Forbes bought the hotel and refurnished it and Henry Sachs managed it.

After Mr. Forbes died, George Thorlby rented the hotel and then it was sold to James Sutherland Cornell, by him to Joseph Krempowich who in turn sold to Samuel Sturman, the present owner.

Le Rue De Commerce, Other Times Other Customs Other Days Other Ways, Winfield Brewster 1954

_________________________

JOSEPH "JOSH" WAYPER
1858-1915


A resident of Hespeler for forty years, Josh Wayper was a marksman of uncanny ability. He was proprietor of the Queen's Hotel in which his numerous trophies and stuffed animals were on display for the public to see.

He was co-founder of the Hespeler Gun Club which was formed in 1883 and was active for many years. In 1896, the Hespeler four man team led by Wayper won the Ontario Championship, breaking 94 out of 100 clay pigeons.

In 1901 Wayper was champion wing-shot of Canada, killing 199 out of 200 live pigeons to equal the World's Record for this type of competition. In trapshooting, Wayper was three times Canadian champion. He also won the championship gold medal for Ontario several times.

On one occasion he was a member of the Canadian team which went to England for the Bisley competition. In the course of his career, Wayper won a great many lesser events as well.

Waterloo Region Hall of Fame

__________________________

A Verdict Secured Against Hespeler Hotel Men

Must Pay a Widow Whose Husband Was Drowned


Guelph, April 4 -- At the Assize Court here yesterday, at which Justice Rose presided, a peculiar case was tried. Last December James A. Crane was returning home from Hespeler, where he had imbibed rather freely, and when a short distance from the village fell into Kribs' dam, and was drowned.

While in Hespeler he had been drinking at Thomas Hunt's and Josh Wayper's hotels, and his widow, claiming that the accident was directly due to the liquor, brought action against the publicans, claiming $500 damages from each. Mrs. Crane told of the departure of her husband from home Friday morning. She told of the circumstances in which the family were left, living on a rented farm, and how the claims against the estate overbalanced the insurance and all that was coming to them. She had three girls and a boy.

DRUNK WHEN DROWNED

Henry Kribs gave evidence as to the distance of the edge of the dam from the road and the landing of the body. Crane had entered the dam from the Guelph end, having evidently driven past it from Hespeler and then returned. He could not see how a man in possession of his senses could drive into the dam, even if it was dark: the horses would keep the road themselves. Further evidence was produced showing that the unfortunate Crane was drunk at the time of his death, and had been sold liquor by the two hotelkeepers sued.

The jury found a verdict against the defendants with damages assessed at $600 in the case of Hunt and $300 against Wayper.

Toronto Star Wednesday April 4, 1895

__________________

Jack Wayper, the Noted Trap Shot, Has Devised a New Scheme for the Hespeler Gun Club

Hespeler, Jan. 10 -- The Hespeler Gun Club has inaugurated a new system of live-bird scoring. It is an idea of Jack Wayper, the noted trap-shooter, who is a member of the club. Mr. Wayper claims that the present system of scoring is unfair, for it a bird is shot inside the boundary line and falls a couple of feet outside there is no score, whereas should it fall a foot inside, the shooter scores a bird. Mr. Wayper thinks a pigeon falling outside, which is gathered behind the dead line by the shooter, within the three-minute limit allowed, should count its killer halt a bird. The Hespeler Gun Club in its shoots hereafter will allow this rule. It was tried for the first time, with the following result.

Toronto Star 10 Jan 1901

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Promoters Were Here Looking Over the Puslinch Lake Deal - Refused to State Who was Behind the Scheme


Several American promoters, interested in electric railways, were in the city yesterday and drove over the several preliminary lines which have already been surveyed to Puslinch Lake.

When seen by The Mercury this morning at the G.T.R. station prior to leaving for Toronto, although they refused to give their names, and state who were interested in the taking over of the franchise which is owned by the city, it is understood that Mackenzie and Mann are interested in the matter, and that it may have been one of their agents who was in charge of the party that drove over the line yesterday.

"It would not pay us to build the line unless it was extended to Hespeler to connect with the G. H. & _. and it is likely that in the event we take the franchise over that the line is built to Hespeler, to make the connection.

"Puslinch Lake is one of the finest spots in Western Canada for a summer resort, and if we decide to push the proposition we will build one of the finest hotels in any summer resort in Canada. I understand that Mr. Josh Wayper who owned several cottages down on the edge of the lake proposed to remove the buildings to Hespeler. He is making a big mistake. Property in the vicinity of the lake will be worth money in a short time and those who hold will make good.

"We don't care what they do - so far as the summer resort is concerned," he continued, "but we want to give the natives a chance to make good. All we want is the right to the franchise over the road, as we are impressed with the situation and think it would prove a money maker."

"I believe you mean business, all right," stated the Mercury reporter. .......

"Nothing doing," answered the civil engineer, who was in charge of the party. "I have nothing for the press."

Continuing, he stated that the company which he represented, had plenty of money to push the project through, provided the Guelph Radial Railway, who held the franchise, were willing to part with it, and were satisfied to see the proposition go through.

"Give us a chance and we will be satisfied," stated the engineer as he climbed on to the car, followed by several other Toronto and Buffalo capitalists, who are interested in the deal.

"You give us a decent deal and we will build the road," he called out as the train pulled out of the yards

Guelph Mercury 6 Feb 1912

____________________

Mr. Josh Wayper Preparing for Erection of Big Resort


A long felt want at Puslinch Lake, the popular summer resort of Galt, Hespeler, Preston and Guelph, will be supplied during the coming summer by Mr. Josh Wayper, who is making preparations for the erection of a handsome, commodious and modern summer hotel. The plans for the structure are being drawn up now and it is hoped that the building will be finished before next fall. Puslinch Lake has long been the mecca of holiday visitors and the lack of accommodation is the only drawback so far felt. With the advent of the new hotel, however, Puslinch should be more popular than ever. Then if that electric railway from Galt to Guelph is ever built, the lake will become a summer resort of no mean importance.

Galt Reporter 12 Apr 1907 
Wayper, Joseph "Josh" (I23286)
 
371 "The Quickfalls of this and other counties of Ontario are all descendants of old Franklin and Barbara Quickfall who emigrated to America and settled in New York State where they resided for many years. One of their sons, named II Thomas was born September 13, 1799. He was married to Hannah Martinson who was born November 14th, 1803, and died June 18th, 1889. In 1841 they (Thomas and his wife) with their family and his aged parents moved to Canada and settled in Waterloo County, Ontario, on the old "Moxley Farm" now known as the "Evergreen Farm", a little north-east of the town of Waterloo. Here they resided until their deaths. He died February 10th, 1868. To them were born several children, but the name of only one of their sons has been received"


Eby, Ezra E. (1895). A biographical history of Waterloo township and other townships of the county: being a history of the early settlers and their descendants, mostly all of Pennsylvania Dutch origin: as also much other unpublished historical information chiefly of a local character. Berlin [Kitchener, Ont.]: [s.n.].

_____________________________

According to letters held by Madeline Lavender of Burlington, Ontario in 1995, brother-in-laws William and John Martinson left Thealby, Lincolnshire, England in the spring of 1830 for Quebec and were some years in Jamesville, Onondaga County, New York through the 1830's. 
Quickfall, Thomas (I2901)
 
372 "The Reicherts (Tradition has it that Daniel and Jacob Reichert in coming to America were on board a vessel that was seized by pirates and the crew and passengers were taken to Turkey where they were landed on some barren coast. In time of six months they were back to London, England, where they again set sail for America and landed safely in 1753. They belonged to the Moravian Brethern in Switzerland from which place they emigrated to America) of Wilmot Township are descendants of Daniel Reichert (Tradition has it that his wife was a Susannah Kindig) who emigrated to America in 1753 and settled in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, where he died after his family was of age. We cannot ascertain at so late a date the names of all of the old progenitor's family, but the names of three of the children were Mary, John and Christian."


Eby, Ezra E. (1895). A biographical history of Waterloo township and other townships of the county: being a history of the early settlers and their descendants, mostly all of Pennsylvania Dutch origin: as also much other unpublished historical information chiefly of a local character. Berlin [Kitchener, Ont.]: [s.n.]. 
Reichert, Daniel (I8784)
 
373 "The Robert Burns Hotel". Operated by Frederick Weltz prior to 1859. From the death of Weltz that year by Christian Pabst till 1864. Then till 1870 by John Ohlman and by Joseph Bolduc in 1871.


Le Rue De Commerce, Other Times Other Customs Other Days Other Ways, Winfield Brewster 1954 
Weltz, Frederick (I82363)
 
374 "The Robert Burns Hotel". Operated by Frederick Weltz prior to 1859. From the death of Weltz that year by Christian Pabst till 1864. Then till 1870 by John Ohlman and by Joseph Bolduc in 1871.


Le Rue De Commerce, Other Times Other Customs Other Days Other Ways, Winfield Brewster 1954 
Bolduc, Joseph (I90871)
 
375 "The Robert Burns Hotel". Operated by Frederick Weltz prior to 1859. From the death of Weltz that year by Christian Pabst till 1864. Then till 1870 by John Ohlman and by Joseph Bolduc in 1871.


Le Rue De Commerce, Other Times Other Customs Other Days Other Ways, Winfield Brewster 1954 
Ohlmann, Johannes "John" (I112277)
 
376 "The Sheriff is in charge of T.G.S. Nevills' store, Ailsa Craig. The last seen of the "Old War Horse" was aboard the ferry between Sarnia and Port Huron, where he was overheard humming the well-known lines from Nancy Lee about, 'The sailor's wife the sailor's star shall be, Away with me across the sea.'"

London Advertiser July 18 1881

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Death of T.J.G. Nevils

"Sunday evening last, about 5 o'clock, the dead body of Mr. Nevils was discovered by some of his neighbors, through his bedroom window, the door having previously been tried but found fastened. After the fact of his death became known, the door was forced and the proper officers summoned to take action. Mr. Nevils lived in a house on the Duncan road, near the residence of J.B. McArthur, and carried on the business of a tailor and repairer of garments, and for some time had lived alone in the house. The jury impanelled returned a verdict that the deceased came to his death from natural causes. J.H. Tuttle, the undertaker, took charge of the body, telegraphing to the dead man's friends the facts in the case. The disease that carried him off is claimed by some to have been dropsy and by others to have been Bright's disease. Two sons of the deceased arrived Monday from Vassar, and preparations made for burial. He was buried in the village cemetery Tuesday afternoon.".'"

"The Cheboygan Democrat" Thursday, March 18, 1886

_______________________________


Built second grist mill in New Hamburg; according to E.W.B. Snider, Neville had a sawvmill and a flour mill which operated for some time, but eventually "the water freshets made conditions very unfortunate, destroying mill dam and damaging buildings, so that where formerly a thriving busines was done, today there is barely a trace left of the industries:

Waterloo Historical Society Annual Volume 6 pg 29

________________________________________

The first name of the place was Cassel, but was shortly changed to New Hamburg. Wm. Scott was one of the most prominent among the pioneer business men. He, about 1834, became possessed of a lot of land and a grist mill. Most, if not all of this property, he purchased from Absolom Schade. According to some one Goschman was the builder and first proprietor of the mill. Scott added a saw mill and distillery, the little group of buildings being located just at the rear of where the Wm. Tell Block now stands. Later a woollen mill was erected on the site of the distillery. Meantime, Charles Kirkpatrick opened the first general store and other tradesmen followed. T. G. S. Neville was the second merchant, following Kirkpatrick in 1835. Neville also built a grist mill and established a second woollen mill. He became the owner of considerable land and was a leading figure for some years, becoming the village's first reeve in 1858. In 1852 Scott erected the large four-story frame flour mill, still familiar to nearly everyone, as it was burned down only six years ago. In 1837 a second visitation of cholera epidemic dealt the place a severe blow. These are, in the main, the facts in connection with the earliest, history of New Hamburg. The names and occupations of a few of the other . early settlers are herewith given in the hope that they may prove of some interest.

Special Industrial souvenir number of New Hamburg: containing a comprehensive review of the natural advantages and resources of the village of New Hamburg, 1908, Berlin Daily News, Berlin, Ontario
_______________________


Titus was named after Titus Geer Simons after his father's commanding officer in the War of 1812 and was reported to have been born in West Flamborough, Wentworth Co., Ontario. He served on Waterloo County Council in the years 1858-1864. 
Nevills, Mayor Titus Geer Simons (I10123)
 
377 "The Sir William Wallace Hotel", built on the site of Willard Cleaners probably about 1845 by Adam Scott was operated by him until 1858, by James Burns, 1859-60; then as a Temperance House again by Mr. Scott till 1873, and by James Murphy Sr., in 1864.


Le Rue De Commerce, Other Times Other Customs Other Days Other Ways, Winfield Brewster 1954

_____________________________

Dreadful Accident from Lightning at New Hope

It falls this week to our lot as public journalists to record one of the most awful, sudden and frightful catastrophes, by which in the twinkling of an eye, unthinking mortals are occasionally hurried off the busy scene of human life, which we recollect as happening in our immediate neighbourhood. On Sunday last, about 5 o'clock in the afternoon, and when the heavy thunder storm which visited this quarter on that day, was raging at its height, just as three men, Frederick Long, Henry Barnhart and a German known as the "Little Waggoner" were in the act of leaving the stoop of the tavern in the Village of New Hope, kept by Mr. Adam Scott, a terrific flash of lightning struck the party and felled them all instantaneously to the earth.

Melancholy to relate, Long was found to have been killed on the spot, his shirt and skin across the breast being most severely burned and singed and part of his clothes rent and torn into shreds by the fearful, yet incomprehensible violence of the electric shock. Barnhart was discovered to have been struck completely blind and has remained so ever since, besides being otherwise severely stunned, burned and injured. The other person, who seems only to be known by the cognomen of the "Little Waggoner" (being a wagon maker in New Hope), was only slightly affected in the foot, in which, however, he experienced a strange, yet painful sensation. Dr. Ebert and Mr. Klotz soon arrived from Preston, but all attempts at reviving Long were tried in vain. Barnhart, who is a brewer in Preston, has since been conveyed home, but notwithstanding every attention medical and otherwise, the poor fellow enjoys little hope of recovering his eyesight, if indeed, his life be spared as he now lies in a precarious condition. Long was 24 years of age, and son-in-law of old Mr. Barnhart and head cooper to Mr. Hespeler, of Preston and had lately been employed at Mr. H's Mills at New Hope. He leaves a wife and child to lament his untimely end, and the bereavement of a kind husband and fond father.

At the time and place where the lightning struck, an extremely strong, sulphurous and suffocating smell pervaded the surrounding atmosphere and even clung to the bodies of the killed and injured, so much so that for some time there was great difficulty in breathing in the vicinity of the spot where the dire calamity occurred.

The Niagara Chronicle of 8 Aug 1850
Picked up and reprinted from The Dumfries Reformer, Galt Ont 
Scott, Adam (I252791)
 
378 "The Sir William Wallace Hotel", built on the site of Willard Cleaners probably about 1845 by Adam Scott was operated by him until 1858, by James Burns, 1859-60; then as a Temperance House again by Mr. Scott till 1873, and by James Murphy Sr., in 1864.


Le Rue De Commerce, Other Times Other Customs Other Days Other Ways, Winfield Brewster 1954 
Burns, James (I82361)
 
379 "The site of / S.S. #4 Hay School / 1840-1959 Source (S1346)
 
380 "The sudden and unexpected death of one of Kitchener's oldest and most respected residents, Mrs. Margaret Bean, took place on Sunday evening about 5: 30 o'clock following an attack of apoplexy. The deceased, who was 87 years of age a few weeks ago, attended the Children's Day exercises and the regular service in Zion Church on Sunday morning, and after partaking of a hearty dinner she retired to her room as usual. On their return after a few hours absence, her daughter, Mrs. Bender, went upstairs and was shocked to find her mother on the floor in her room cold in death. No one was near. Her death was a peaceful one.

Mrs. Bean moved here with her family from Mildmay over 32 years ago, where her husband Mr. Daniel Bean, died a year previous, and where they had lived for eight years. Mrs. Bean was born in Chippewa on the Canadian side of the Niagara River, on May 30th 1831, and in the fall of the same year she moved with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Hailer, to near German Mills, later removing to what was then the beginning of this city. Growing to womanhood, she wedded Rev. Jacob Wagner, with whom she lived a few brief years until his death. Later she was wedded to Mr. Daniel Bean, who in the early sixties, taught school in the vicinity of Freeport and later in Dundee, and Dashwood, after which he took up farming on the original Bean homestead in Blandford Township, Oxford County, and then moving to Mildmay in 1878. She saw this city grow from a few houses to the present status of a city, as also the church of her choice, in which she was a life member and an active and energetic worker in various departments. She had many friends by whom she will be greatly missed and for whom she always had a cheerful and comforting word.

She leaves to mourn her sudden departure four sons and four daughters; Rev. L. H. Wagner, Supt. of N. W. Missions of the Evang. Association; Mrs. Hy. R. Bates, Elgin, Ill.; Rev. E. H. Bean, Milverton; Mrs. Hy. N. Schmidt, S. Dakota; Mrs. E. M. Haist, Buffalo; S. U. Bean, Kitchener; Rev. J. Wesley Bean, Mt. Elgin; Mrs. A. C. Bender, Kitchener; also 33 grand children and 7 great-grandchildren. Mrs. Hy. S. Dickert, Regina, Sask.; and Mrs. Fred Schnittker, Bruce County, are stepdaughters"


Berlin Daily Telegraph Jul 8, 1918


___________________


Mrs. Margaret Bean. Mrs. Margaret Bean, one of Kichener's oldest residents, was found lying on the floor of her room on Sunday night by her daughter, Mrs. A. C. Bender, after having suffered an attack of apoplexy, and died almost instantly. She was in her eighty-eighth year and had attended Sunday School and church in the morning. She was twice married, her first husband being the late Rev. Jacob Wagner, and her second husband was the late Daniel Bean, who died thirty-two years ago in Mildmay. She lived in Kitchener for thirty-two years and was well-known in the community."


Monkton Times 11 Jul, 1918

________________________

Margaret Street in Kitchener was named in her honour. 
Hailer, Margaret (I15451)
 
381 "The Terrace" is a two storey, side gabled building, simple but pleasing in design.  It was built by the Perine family to house their workers brought over from England and Scotland to work in their flax and twine mills. Kitchener, Doon Village Rd. 1213-1217 (2 storey - row - "The Terrace") (I482)
 
382 "The unexpected death of Mr. Frank Haight, Managing Director and Secretary of the Waterloo Mutual Fire Insurance Company, which took place on Friday afternoon, came as a distinct shock to the community and in his sudden passing Waterloo mourns the loss of another of its leading citizens who has occupied a place of prominence in its business life.

Although Mr. Haight had been in indifferent health since last September he attended to his duties at the Waterloo Mutual until February since which time he had been endeavoring to regain his health by a respite from all office work. About a month ago he spent several weeks in the South and since his return had visited the Waterloo Mutual office from time to time although not able to actively take up his duties.

On Friday morning he was at his office and appeared to be feeling as usual, however, he complained of feeling ill and despite the best of medical attention, gradually sank, until his death about 5:30 o'clock. The cause of death was angina pectoris.

The funeral will take place from the residence, corner of John and Mary Sts., Waterloo, on Monday afternoon at two o'clock where a service will be held. Interment will take place in Mount Hope Cemetery.

Frank Haight who was the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Arnoldi Haight was born near New Market, Oct. 23rd, 1850, his parents being engaged in farming at that place. As a young man he was a member of the teaching profession, teaching at a number of places. In 1885 he came to Waterloo and entered the offices of the Waterloo Mutual Fire Insurance Company. He occupied the position of Assistant Secretary until 1898 when he succeeded to the position of Manager and Secretary upon the retirement of the late Cyrus Taylor.

In 1903 Mr. Haight was married to Minnie Kaatz, daughter of Mrs. Kaatz, of Waterloo. To them were born two children a daughter and a son, viz: Rachel and Frank Arnoldi. Besides his wife, two sisters, the Misses Haight, of Newmarket, and two brothers, James C. Haight, Waterloo and Charles Haight of Los Angeles, Cal., sincerely mourn his demise.

The late Mr. Haight as manager of one of the largest Fire Insurance Companies in the Province, was widely known. He was particularly well versed in all matters pertaining to Fire Insurance. The present strong position of the Waterloo Mutual is, in a liberal measure, due to his care and foresight.

Mr. Haight always took a sympathetic and enthusiastic interest in organizations of a philanthropic and patriotic nature. He was a member of the Hospital Board for a number of years and as president of the Belgian Relief Fund, performed most useful and efficient service.

He was a close student of municipal affairs and took a lively interest in all matters affecting the welfare of the town.

Few citizens were better read and in organizations of an educational character he displayed a keen interest. During the year 1914 he was President of the Waterloo County Canadian Club.

In politics Mr. Haight was a staunch Liberal and a prominent member of the party in North Waterloo.

The death of Mr. Haight removes a high type of citizen who filled offices of trust and responsibility with conspicuous zeal, energy and intelligence."

Waterloo Chronicle Telegram" June 10, 1915. 
Haight, Frank (I41692)
 
383 "The worst disaster of the early nineteenth century was the wreck of the Lady Sherbrooke (1831) at Cape Ray with the loss of 239 persons"

Outrageous Seas. (2016). Google Books. Retrieved 11 September 2016, from https://books.google.ca/books?id=shWPE-0vzVEC&pg=PA35&lpg=PA35&dq=%22lady+sherbrooke%22+ship+wrecked&source=bl&ots=xrW-W0NzqR&sig=oKPi7vg0XU38-OfX2-TD9cgvcw8&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiD7aPAyIfPAhWMNT4KHSfuCY4Q6AEIHjAA#v=onepage&q=%22lady%20sherbrooke%22%20ship%20wrecked&f=false 
Laird, John (I399033)
 
384 "There is a Grant Bean located in 1900 in Huron county, Windsor Tp., Which is probably Ulysses Grant Bean. If so, he was born in Aug, 1867 in Canada. His father was born in Canada and his mother was born in Germany. He was 32. He emigrated to the US in 1878, which would be one year before David Bean's reported death in 1879, and had been in the US for 22 years. Grant would have been age 10. He was a farmer. His wife, Emma, was born in June 1874 in Michigan, although her parents were both born in Germany. She was 25. the couple had been married for 6 years (circa 1894) and had produced 2 children, two surviving (Madeline, age 5 and Edith, age 3). 1900 Michigan Census, Huron County,Windsor Tp., E.D. 27, Sheet 17. They were still in this area in 1920, where Grant Bean was farming at the age of 42. On this census he reported that they had been married, both for the first time, for 14 years, which would then be 1896 and one year after Madeline Bean's birth. Emma was 36.She had produced three children, two surviving: Madeline, now age 14, and Roland, age 4. Edith was missing. However, on this census he reported that he emigrated to the US in 1869, which would make him age 2. 1910 Michigan census, Huron County, Windsor Tp., E.D. 29 Sheet 2A."

Biehn-Bean Family of Bucks County, Pennsylvania and Ontario, Canada 1700-1986, by Donald M. Biehn

___________________

BEAN, U. GRANT. His father was David Bean, who was born Nov. 12, 1830, in Wilmot Township,Waterloo County, Ontario, Canada, and his mother was Anna Martha Truemner and born July 28, 1837, in Gilseberg, Tryso County, Kurhessen, Germany. The subject of this sketch was born in Huron County, Canada, June 20, 1868. They came to Michigan in 1878. Married Emma Dietzel . Her father was Traugott Dietzel, who was born in Saxenweimer, Germany, Nov. 22, 1834, and her mother was Ernestina Blacksmith, born in Welshendorf, Germany, Aug. 27, 1844. Children are: Martha Madeline, born April 6, 1893, and Edith Helen, born March 31, 1896. Mr. Bean's father died when he was 11 years old and he with his mother and five brothers moved to Winsor Township when it was nothing but a wilderness of green swampy land. After years of toil and hardship, such as early settlers only know, he has succeeded in clearing and paying for one of the best 80-acre farms in Winsor Township. Mr. Bean has five sisters and three brothers living and one brother who is dead.

Biographical sketch of U. Grant Bean excerpted from 1905 "Plat book of Huron County, Michigan... with biographical sketches" by E. B. (Ernest B.) Foote, Phildelphia, Penn.: Imperial Publishing Co., 1904, pg 85 
Biehn, Ulysses Grant "Grant" (I15446)
 
385 "There was no one Arlene was prouder of than her Grand Sons Michael and Jamie" Arlene Ober (nee Golbeck) "Before the silver cord has snapped …the spirit returns to God who gave it." (Excerpts from ECCLESIASTES 12:6-7) Survived by her children Patricia and Mike Cote, grandchildren Michael and Leanne Cote and Jamie and Melissa Cote, great grandchildren Liam and Liberty Cote and daughter-in-law Jane Waurechen and her husband Tony Fleischmann. She is also survived by siblings Shirley and Glenn Becker, Ruth Golbeck and Cal and Diane Golbeck, many nieces and nephews and sisters-in-law Jean Letson and Vi and Bill Walls. Predeceased by her son Ron A. (Ronnie) Ober in 2003, her husband Ron D. Ober in 1989, parents John and Edith (nee Ermel) Golbeck, siblings Elizabeth (Robert) Stead, Earl (Clarice) Golbeck, Claude (Thelma and Lela) Golbeck, Erie (Jean) Golbeck, Laverne (Beatrice) Golbeck, Lorene (Lorne) Giilck and Wayne Golbeck (stillborn), aunts Almeda (Clarence) Eby and Loly (Ed) Querin, brother-in-law Alvin Letson and nieces Judy, Gail, Shirley and Cathy. "One must die to one life before entering another". Arlene was born in the family home in Bamberg and grew up in Williamsburg In her teens, she played baseball for the "Plains Janes" She worked at Arrow Shirts, Dare Cookies and at Sunnyside Home for 25 ½ years and was also a member at St Luke's Church for 50 years A memorial service celebrating Arlene's life will be held at St Luke's Lutheran Church, 317 Franklin St N, Kitchener on Thursday at 11 o'clock with Pastor Jim Koellner officiating . A reception will follow in the church hall. For those who wish, memorial donations may be made to the KW Humane Society, the Grand River Regional Cancer Centre or St Luke's Lutheran Church. Arrangements entrusted to the Ratz-Bechtel Funeral Home (519)745-9495 "The goal is not to live forever. The goal is to do or leave something that does."

"Arlene Ober Obituary - Kitchener, ON". 2020. Dignity Memorial. https://www.dignitymemorial.com/en-ca/obituaries/kitchener-on/arlene-ober-4803018. 
Golbeck, Arlene (I449740)
 
386 "TOMAN, Clarence Earl -July 29, 1915-Feb. 1, 2003. Clarence Toman passed away during his 87th year, on Feb. 1, 2003, at St. Elizabeth's Hospital, in Humboldt, Sask.

He was the beloved husband of Fern (Weber) Toman and the dear father of five children, Faye of Spruce Grove, Alta. (and her husband George Bergmann), Elaine of Kitchener (and her husband Boyd Snider), Earl of Ottawa (and his wife Cynthia Harris), Fred of Guernsey, Sask. (and his wife Elsie Bushman), and Barry of Spiritwood, Sask. (and his wife Margery Olsen). He had 12 grandchildren and 11 gr-grandchildren.

Born on July 29, 1915 at Guernsey, Sask., Mr. Toman was predeceased by his parents, Manassa and Elsie (Biehn) Toman as well as his brother,Willard of Chesley, Ont. and four sisters, Vera (who died at the age of 9), Gertrude (Gingerich), Mary (Cressman) and Loretta (Shantz) - all of Guernsey.

Mr. Toman farmed at Guernsey on land his father homesteaded in 1905,until his retirement and move to the town of Guernsey in 1977. He and his wife moved to Manitou Lodge in Jan. 2001. They have been life long members of Sharon Mennonite Church...Sharon Mennonite Cemetery..."

KW Record obit. of Fri., Feb. 7, 2003 
Toman, Clarence Earl (I99472)
 
387 "Too Much Lager Beer". A rather singular affair occurred here lately. Dr. Senghas, a well known physician in Dundee, whose practice consists in drinking "lagerbeer", went home intoxicated, and soon raised a quarrel with his "frau". He seized a loaded revolver and fired it off and threatened dire vengeance.

His wife soon gave the alarm and the constable proceeded to the place. The doctor ran, but the constable ran faster, as the doctor is rather corpulent. The doctor unfortunately fell and was soon overtaken. He was taken before the magistrate, and bound over to keep the peace. He has since left the place and it is thought he has taken up his abode in Formosa, county of Bruce.

Dumfries Reformer April 23, 1873 
Senghas, Dr. Christian Ludwig "Lewis" (I138030)
 
388 "TREITZ, Charles Elgin (Charlie) - Passed away, Monday, May 15, 2000, at St. Mary's General Hospital, Kitchener, in his 81st year.

Born in Wallace township, Perth County, on Jan. 21, 1920, he was a son of the late Edwin O. Treitz and Della E. Horne. With his wife Maureen, he took over his father's farm on the 3rd of Wallace and farmed there for 30 years, then moved to Listowel and worked at the Midwestern Regional Children's Centre, until his retirement in 1985.

Survived by his four daughters, Donna and her husband Mike Phillips,Carol and her husband Rob Phillips, Cathy Jenkins and Mary Treitz, all of Kitchener-Waterloo and his brother, Ken Treitz and his wife Audrey of Goderich; also survived by five grandchildren, Laurie Phillips and her husband Marcos Kroeker, Scott Phillips, Steve Jenkins and Kris and Jen Whyte and by his sister-in-law Alma Scott of Midland. He leaves behind numerous loving friends and relatives with whom he had a great many laughs over the years and especially Doreen Whitfield, Marion and Neil Forman and Paul and Sherry Berfelz who provided constant friendship and support.

Predeceased by his loving wife, Maureen Scott in 1993 and a dear son-in-law Chris Jenkins in 1994. Charlie was an avid member and past president of the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 259 and a drummer for 25years in the Listowel Legion Pipe Band. Always proud of his daughters and their accomplishments, he fostered a love of music and laughter that lives on in his children and grandchildren. Over the years, he found much joy in playing cribbage and euchre, curling, fishing and spending time with his buddies at the hunt camp.....Fairview Cemetery, Listowel.... written by Cathy Jenkins.

KW Record obit. of Tues., May 16, 2000
 
Treitz, Charles Elgin "Charlie" (I235237)
 
389 "Two sisters, Florence and Salina Shantz, also saw entrepreneurial opportunities in Berlin. Florence's specialty was bonnet making, a difficult skill to master. Bonnets were not easily mass produced, and making them by hand provided Mennonite women with a cottage industry opportunity of they were adept. The sisters had first moved to Kitchener from a farm near Philipsburg after their parents died. While renting an apartment, they slowly built up their dressmakers' business. In 1937, they were able to build their own house at 11 Stirling Avenue North, and ran the business from there. Salina and Florence might be making bonnets one day, and fancy wedding dresses for non-Mennonites the next. Younger relatives describe the sisters' home: 'They kept an immaculate house. No time was wasted chatting on the telephone. The newspaper was not opened until the day's work was completed and the house set in order. In spite of this, the nieces and nephews loved to go totheir aunts' house. It gave them a warm feeling'."

Risk and Endurance: A History of Stirling Avenue Mennonite Church

_______________

"Shantz, Florence, daughter of Wendell S. and Mary Ann Shantz, was born in Wilmot Twp., Ont., Mar. 16, 1892; died at K-W Hospital, Kitchener, Ont., Dec. 17, 1980; aged 88 y. She was the last surviving member of her family. She was preceded in death by 3 brothers (David Manassah, and Jeremiah), and 2 sisters (Veronica and Salina). She was a member of First Mennonite Church, where funeral services were held on Dec. 10, in charge of Glenn Brubacher; interment in Shantz Mennonite Cemetery. "

Gospel Herald, Jan. 1981 
Shantz, Florence (I24155)
 
390 "Unhealthy as a child Wanda spent time in Penetang, Ontario," her brother relates, "and while there she took an interest in nursing." She is recorded on an October 14, 1911, communication, as in the School of Nursing, Geneva Hospital, Geneva, New York. She graduated from that institution as a registered nurse.

July 16, 1916, Wanda Hannusch married Charles Hazleton, of the United States, and the couple settled in the City of Detroit, Michigan. They lived at dwellings, in that city, at 752 Grand River Ave., on Russell Street and on Clay Avenue. Before long the couple turned their attention toward new business enterprises. She had no children by this or her second marriage.


https://family.hannush.com/third-generation.html 2013 
Hannusch, Wanda (I97579)
 
391 "Waldemar was born in a farmhouse near Milverton, ON, where an English family lived in another part of the house. As he learned to talk, he was bilingual. In 1894 when he was 8 years old, his parents moved to New Hamburg, ON, There was no high school there, so upon passing his entrace exams, at age 13, he went to work in a general store for $1.25 a week, and didn't get to high school until 8 years later. during that time, he worked as a salesman in stores in New Hamburg, Kitchener, Toronto, and Leamington. In accordance to family tradition and custom, except for a small allowance, all his earnings went into the family budget. when he was 21, as was family custom, he was on his own.

With $21.00 in his pocket, he started out as a salesman, working in Kitchener, then west to Moose jaw, SK (it was 52 degrees below 0). In May he went to the Okanagan Valley, BC (his mother's brother Ben's place). He stayed, earning $2.50 a day, to drive a team of bronchos for work at different contracts. He also worked as an assistant minister. Ten years after leaving home, he was ordained as a Minister, with the United Church. Minister emeritus Zion United Church, Brantford. Received his MA at University of Chicago, March 1917." from a submission to Ancestry.com 2005
 
Wilhelm, Rev. Waldemar (I4605)
 
392 "was found burned in house fire. The charred remains found in ruins of the house burned down fire, ..., supposed to have caught by pipe running through house. Ellenbaum, William (I124202)
 
393 "was found burned in house fire. The charred remains found in ruins of the house burned down fire, ..., supposed to have caught by pipe running through house. Rebecca Matilda (I124203)
 
394 "We drove to Galt on Sundays to church and put up our pony at the Queen's Arms Hotel. Dr. Bayne had left the church on the hill the year I was born. I remember the Rev. Mr. Smith, and after him came the Rev. Hamilton Gibson. I always spent my holidays in Galt with my uncles and aunts, and went with them to Trinity Church. Dr. Boomer afterward married my aunt, Mrs. Shade. I remember some of the young men who assisted Dr. Boomer. There were: Mr. Dumoulin and Mr. Carmichael, both of whom afterward became Bishops;.."

Waterloo Historical Society, Annual Volume 1925 - REMINISCENCES OF EARLY WATERLOO. By A. S. Allan, (Sheriff of Wellington County.) 
DuMoulin, Rev. J. Philip (I216386)
 
395 "We have the pleasure to notify our numerous friends and customers, that the Bridge between this and Glasgoe is now finished...Our store is now filled to overflow of all such goods and articles usually desirable in the country, whilst low prices and prompt attention to all our customers will be our chief endeaver. Tagge & Robish

Deutscher Canadier 17 Nov 1847

____________________

He (Rev. F. W. Bindeman) rode from place to place on a white horse and often cantered over to Bridgeport. At Bridgeport there was a merchant named Tagge who had just been made a magistrate and who was puffed up. One afternoon, on seeing Mr. Bindemann riding in, he said to several customers at his store-door, "Stay, and we'll have some fun with the preacher." When the rider reached the store, Tagge droned, "How is it, Pastor, that you must have a grand white horse when our Saviour was content to ride about on a humble ass?" The response came forth, "We can't do that anymore, for all the asses have been made magistrates,"

History of Kitchener pg 45

______________________


DEATH OF PETER N. TAGGE

Peter N. Tagge died at his residence on S. Fifth avenue, Monday night, at ten o'clock, of Bright's disease and old age. He was born at Marne, Holstein, Germany, Nov. 22nd, 1817, and emigrated to Canada in 1842, where he was a prosperous businessman for a number of years. He came to Ann Arbor about twenty years ago and has since lived a retired life. He was married in 1843 to Miss Mary Dobbins, who survives him with the following children: Mrs. Christina Gooch, of Shelbyville, MO., Mrs. Margaret Blackford of Shelbina, MO.; Mrs. William J. Miller, of this city; Prof Arthur Tagge, of the Monroe high school and John Tagge, of London, Ont.

Ann Arbor Argus, Friday, 8 Jan 1892 
Tagge, Peter Nicholaus (I30868)
 
396 "WEBER - Elizabeth, d/o Sidney and Caroline Weber, was born near Elmira, Ont. in 1893; died June 6, 1931; aged 38yrs. She is survived by her parents, 2 sisters, 1 brother, and many friends who keenly feel the loss of the departed sister. She was a member of the Mennonite Church, always taking a keen and active part in the church and S. S. work. Funeral services were held at Elmira Mennonite Church. Interment in the adjoining cemetery."

Gospel Herald, July 1931 
Weber, Elizabeth (I17985)
 
397 "Weismiller: Mrs. Sophia Weismiller One more pioneer, in the person of Mrs. Sophia Weismiller, has passed to the Great Beyond, after reaching the ripe old age of almost eighty-four years. Her husband, John Weismiller having predeceased her some fifteen years ago. Mrs. Weismiller, nee Miss Sophia Holzshuh, settled with her parents in the County of Waterloo, Township of Wellesley, in the early Fifties when the country was practically all bush and the bears were roaming at large. She, being the eldest of six, necessarily had to help to bear the burden of the hardships encountered in pioneer life. In 1855 she was joined in Wedlock and settled in Wellesley village, where they resided continuously for fifty two years. To this happy union were born four daughters and two sons, of whom the following survive, namely: Mrs. J, Neibel of Detroit, Mich; Mrs, J. Lesperance of Windsor, Ont; Mrs. J. Barnes of Assiniboia, and John, of Crepar, Sask

In 1905 after fifty years of Wedded life, they celebrated their Golden Wedding at which were gathered six children and eight Grandchildren and about fifty close and lifelong friends. In 1907 they bid adieu to their many friends to reside with their youngest daughter, Mrs. John Barnes, at Tavistock, Ont., where her life partner was called to his Heavenly home, leaving her to mourn the loss of a dearly beloved husband. Endeared by so many long years of close companionship, but being of strong constitution, and having always lived a very active life, she migrated with her daughter and son-in-law to the far West, where she resided till her Heavenly Father, to whom she at all times entrusted her every care, called her home to her reward. During the last five years she was afflicted with poor health but she bore her lot with great fortitude, waiting and being ready for the hour to come when she could join her loved ones who have gone before."

The Tavistock Gazette: Thursday. April 19, 1923 
Holzschuh, Sophia Elisabetha (I225884)
 
398 "Wendell R. Shantz, 79, of Nine Pines, died suddenly at his home early this morning. Born in Wilmot tp., he was a s/o the late Mr. and Mrs. Levi Shantz. Hewas a well-known farmer in the community and was a member of the First Mennonite Church. Surviving are his wife, the former Priscilla Swartz; three sons, Lloyd of Breslau, Ward of Kitchener and Clayton of Baden; three daughters, Mrs.Edwin (Leota) Feick, Nine Pines, Mrs. Vernon (Vinetta) Witmer,Petersburg, and Mrs. Lloyd (Dorothy) Schmitt, New Dundee; 21 grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren...")

Kitchener-Waterloo Record 25 Oct 1949

________________

Shantz. -- Wendell R., last surviving member of the Levi Shantz family, was born March 1, 1870, at Philipsburg, Ont.; died suddenly Oct. 25, 1949, at the home of his son (Clayton); aged 79 y. 7 m. 24 d. On Feb. 8, 1899, he was united in marriage to Priscilla Swartz, who survives. Also surviving are 3 sons (Lloyd, Breslau, Ont.; Ward, Kitchener, Ont.; Clayton, Baden, Ont.), 3 daughters (Leota - Mrs. Edwin Feick, Nine Pines, Ont.; Vinetta - Mrs. Vernon Witmer, Petersburg, Ont.; and Dorothy - Mrs. Lloyd Schmitt, New Dundee, Ont.), 21 grandchildren, and 2 great-grandchildren. In 1904 he united with the Mennonite Church, of which he was a faithful member until death. He was interested in spiritual things, the fellowship and activities of the church, and made a contribution to the community in which he lived. Funeral services were held at the First Mennonite Church, Kitchener, Ont., in charge of C. F. Derstine and John H. Hess. Text: Ps. 134:4. Burial was made in the cemetery there.

Gospel Herald - Volume XLII, Number 49 - December 6, 1949 - page 1206: 
Shantz, Wendel R. (I19151)
 
399 "When the [Fenian] trouble was over, the officers seemed desirous of continuing the training indefinitely, but they found difficulty in impressing their men with the necessity of this. One of the unconvinced was Sandy Carrick. A grandson of Alexander Harvie, he had a true Scottish sense of humor. Musket practice consisted of putting powder in the gun and all firing at a given command. This was repeated over and over and no one realized (perhaps not even Sandy) that his gun was not going off with the rest. It was only becoming more and more full of powder. During one volley his weapon did explode, and the recoil knocked him flat on the ground. There he lay, motionless, while the crowd gathered round. When the smoke had all rolled away and everyone was beginning to really worry, Sandy opened his eyes and said: 'Tell Jean I died fighting for the Queen and for my country.'"

Andrew W. Taylor, Our Todays and Yesterdays (1970), p. 57 
Carrick, Alexander "Alex" "Sandy" (I137105)
 
400 "William "Ben" Uttley in 1893 bought the struggling Berlin Daily Telegraph and two months later launched the Daily Record , now the Record.

Born in Elmira, he was educated at the local public school, the Berlin High School and the Toronto Business College. He began his active newspaper work with the St. Louis, Missouri, Chronicle.

Uttley was intensely interested in civic affairs and served as a member of the city council. He was one of the charter members of the Waterloo Historical Society, collected much historical data and published a History of Kitchener in 1939.

In 1919 he sold the News Record to W.D. Euler and W.J. Motz and returned to Elmira where he purchased the Elmira Signet."

Waterloo County Hall of Fame website 2009 https://www.region.waterloo.on.ca/WEB/Region.nsf/8ef02c0fded0c82a85256e590071a3ce/D22EE171F2AA335185256B0A004D7B4C?OpenDocument

____________________

In his eightieth year, William V. Uttley, passed away at his home in Elmira on Thursday evening, May 25th. Up until the past few months he had enjoyed very good health, but recently he began to fail, until his passing this week. For the past twenty-five years was a continuous resident of Elmira and he was a familiar figure about town as he enjoyed taking long walks daily when the weather was fine.

Born in Elmira, Jan. 1, 1865, he received his early education in Kitchener and went through as a school teacher and taught for three years at Doon. At this time he entered the newspaper business with the old Berlin Publishing Company and later was its editor. It was through his efforts and business administration The News-Record became a daily newspaper twenty-five years ago.

In 1919 he sold out his controlling interest in the News-Record and came to Elmira to live and on Dec. 1st, 1919 he purchased the Elmira Signet from George Klinck and became editor and proprietor of his home town newspaper. He retained the Signet only for a few years and sold out to Mr. Kester. Since that time he has lived retired.

He was an outstanding writer in his time and through all his years of retirement was intensely interested in newspaper work and development. His writing ability during retirement was chiefly directed to collecting historical data. He compiled and published a history of Kitchener which has been used as a reference book by many, tracing early historical events. An original member of the Waterloo Historical Society much credit can be given to the late Mr. Uttley for its present high standing and collection of historical data.

A Mason for fifty years, he was signally honoured the week previous to his death by being presented with a fifty-year membership jewel by members of the Grand Valley Lodge, Kitchener. A fitting ceremony had been planned by the lodge but due to Mr. Uttley's very poor health at the time, he was unable to attend.

The late Mr. Uttley was popularly known about Elmira as "Ben" and held in the highest esteem by a host of friends both young and old. While living to eighty years of age, he kept in close touch with world affairs and as well read on many subjects. Except for his hearing, he was in possession of all his faculties to the last. One fact might be mentioned which was a characteristic of the man was that his word once given in trust was strictly adhered to, as this seemed to be a very important side of his character. While engaged in newspaper work in Kitchener, he took an active interest in the city's welfare and served on the city council for a number of terms.

Those left to mourn their loss are his wife, formerly Sara Matthews of Doon; two daughters, Mrs. B.H. (Vera) Tanner, of Toronto and Mrs. Harry (Kathleen) Weichel of Elmira; one grandchild and two sisters, Miss A. Uttley of Kitchener and Mrs. Mary Parr of Detroit.

Funeral services were conducted from Dreisinger's Funeral Chapel on Monday afternoon with Rev. F. Malinsky of St. Paul's Lutheran Church officiating. 
Uttley, William Valores "Ben" (I127128)
 

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