Waterloo Region Generations
A record of the people of Waterloo Region, Ontario.
Alexander Turnbull

Alexander Turnbull

Male 1781 - 1865  (84 years)

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  • Name Alexander Turnbull 
    Born 1781  , Berwickshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Religion 1861  Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Church of Scotland 
    Eby ID Number Waterloo-254913 
    Died 4 Mar 1865  Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I254913  Generations
    Last Modified 1 Dec 2019 

    Family Euphemia Davidson,   b. 12 May 1784, Lilliesleaf, , Roxburgh, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Oct 1846, , Wentworth Co., Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 62 years) 
    Married 12 Jan 1812  Boswells, Roxburgh, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Children 
     1. Catherine Turnbull,   b. 1818, , Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Jan 1895, Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years)
     2. John Turnbull,   b. 30 Mar 1819, Channelkirk, Berwickshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Nov 1882  (Age 63 years)
     3. Euphemia Turnbull,   b. 14 Mar 1831, , Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Dec 1917, Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 86 years)
     4. William Turnbull,   b. CA 1840,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 2 Dec 2019 
    Family ID F17091  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Alexander Turnbull
    Alexander Turnbull
    Andrew Turnbull originally shared this on 02 Apr 2016 to Ancestry Public Member Trees

  • Notes 
    • THE first settlers of Dumfries were generally of a superior class. With few exceptions, they had received a good education at the Parochial Schools of their native land, and many of them brought with them to Canada a thirst for knowledge which even the necessities of bush life could not eradicate. This led to very early endeavours to combine instruction with amusement during their leisure hours.

      It will surprise many to learn, however, that as early as 1834, when clearings were but few and far between, and when the wolf and bear were not unfrequent visitors, that a Debating society was in full blast during the winter evenings. Such was the fact„ however, and long and excit-ing were the discussions which took place.

      The scene of these intellectual combats was the home Mr. John Reid, after whom the clachan of Reidsville has been called, and who only passed away to his rest a few months ago. The members of the society were Messrs.John Black, John Reid, Thomas and James Dalgliesh, William Veitch, Alex. Turnbull, Thomas Ritchie, William Hastie, Andrew Mathieson, James Cunningham, Andrew Elliott, John Currie, John Johnston, George Cunningham, Alex. Beckett, James Oliver, Thomas Cleghorn, and occasionally a few others. A majority of these gentlemen still survive, and the mere recital of their names will awaken in the minds of those acquainted with them, many pleasing, and possibly some sad, reminiscences of the past.

      It is needless to say that this Society was an exceedingly vigorous one, and that the questions discussed were characteristic of the time. Among them were the following:
      (1) Which is most benefit to mankind, Agriculture or Commerce ?
      (2) Whether is the profane man or the hypocrite most injury to society?
      (3) Which is the most destructive element, fire or water?
      (4) Whether does wood or iron most benefit mankind ? and
      (5) Would a ship made of iron sink or swim?

      The debates upon these and similar subjects, which, in the absence of candles, sometimes took place by the light of burning pine knots, were characterised by deep interest and not a little talent, and, to use the language of one of the participants: "Nothing could exceed the enjoyment of these gatherings."

      The annual dinner of the Debaters was an occasion never to be forgotten. It was also held at Mr. Reid's house, but the viands were provided by the members of the Society generally. It could not boast of the cuisine of Delmonico, nor of bills of fare in French and perfume. It was considered, however, a veritable feast at that time. The Society unitedly purchased a sheep. That was the first step. From this was made soup, a haggis-the oat-meal for which had to be brought from a drug store in Dundas and roast and boiled joints. Add to this description, a few " cakes of the period," and you have the dinner, gastronomically considered, in all its glory

      It was, however, "the feast of reason and flow of soul" which followed, that gave the occasion its princi-pal attraction. The speeches-the songs-the hilarity-can be better imagined than described. As an illustration of the mirthful spirit which prevailed, it may be mentioned that, on one occasion, whilst ladling out huge platefuls of the steaming haggis, John Black, the chairman, vigorously recited Burns' address to that famous dish:

      "Fair, fa your honest, sonsie face,
      Great chieftain o' the puddin' race;
      Aboon them a' ye tak your place,
      Painch, tripe or thairm,
      Weel are ye wordy of a grace
      As lang's my arm."

      Nothing could better illustrate the character of the early settlers of Dumfries than efforts at intellectual improvement under such formidable difficulties. It is not too much to say of them, that no part of Canada has been settled by a class of men of greater physical and mental energy. "None but Lowland Scotchmen would ever have cleared North Dumfries," is a remark which has frequently been made. This may be an exaggeration. But those who remember how heavily timbered, how stony and how swampy its rugged hills and valleys were forty years ago, will readily admit, that only the highest courage, and most indomitable energy and perseverance, could have made the township what it is today in the same space of time. Had their work to be done over again, could a magician's wand once more make Dumfries the tangled forest it was when this history began, we venture to say their descendants would never undertake to perform it!

      Reminiscences of the Early History of Galt and the Settlement of Dumfries in the Province of Ontario, by James Young, 1880 Toronto: Hunter, Rose

      ___________________

      TURNBULL - Died at Galt, on the 4th of March, 186 5, at the residence of his son-in-law, William Quarrie, Esq., Mr. Alexander Turnbull, a native of Berwickshire, Scotland, and father of William Turnbull, ironfounder, of this city, aged 82 years.

      Hamilton Spectator 13 Mar 1865

      _________________

      In Galt, at the residence of his son-in-law, Wm. Quarrie, Esq., on Saturday afternoon last, Mr. Alexander Turnbull, aged 83 years.

      Galt Reporter Mar 10 1865 pg 2

  • Sources 
    1. [S1838] Census - ON, Waterloo, Galt - 1861, Galt 1861 Div. 4 Page 49.

    2. [S2181] Scotland, Select Marriages, 1561-1910.
      Name:Alexander Turnbull
      Gender:Male
      Marriage Date:12 Jan 1812
      Marriage Place:Saint Boswells,Roxburgh,Scotland
      Spouse:Euphemia Davidson
      FHL Film Number:1067951, 0102301

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 1781 - , Berwickshire, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsReligion - Church of Scotland - 1861 - Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 4 Mar 1865 - Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth