Waterloo Region Generations
A record of the people of Waterloo Region, Ontario.

Albert Gardner Wood

Male 1886 - 1973  (87 years)


Personal Information    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    Event Map    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Albert Gardner Wood 
    Born 2 May 1886  New York City, New York, USA. Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Interesting architect, life story 
    Occupation 1911  Vancouver, , British Columbia, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    architect 
    Eby ID Number Waterloo-113048 
    Died 21 Aug 1973  Port Washington, Nassau, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried New York City, New York, USA. Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I113048  Generations
    Last Modified 19 May 2022 

    Family Louisa Moyer,   b. 16 Oct 1883, Walkerton, Brant Twp., Bruce Co., Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Jan 1965, Port Washington, Nassau, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years) 
    Married 20 Apr 1912  Vancouver, , British Columbia, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Children 
     1. Paul Winthrop Wood,   b. 1922, , Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Aug 2003, Port Washington, Nassau, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years)
    Last Modified 20 May 2022 
    Family ID F28635  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Ford Homes Historic District History by Joseph Oldenburg

      In late 1918 the Henry Ford & Son tractor plant, located south of the present Conrail tracks and east of present Oakwood, employed some 400 men. The plant had been started in 1915 to build a tractor that Henry Ford hoped would help his friend, the American farmer. The tractor sold well and brought prosperity to the tractor plant workers, but the workers faced other problems. Most of them were forced to rent homes in Detroit for the then high rate of $75 a month and spend an hour each day on a crowded Detroit United Railway streetcar to get to work. Rents for the few houses in Dearborn were very high, and a general building slump had hit the country as World War I was winding down.

      At this time someone approached Henry Ford with the idea of solving Dearborn's housing problems and also showing the rest of the country that home building was feasible despite the economic climate. E.G. Liebold, Henry Ford's personal secretary, may have been the person who suggested it to Ford. It is also said that possibly Clara Bryant Ford, Henry's wife, was an early advocate of the idea. Whoever initiated the idea, Ford gave his 'hearty approval' as long as his name was not connected with the project in order that it could succeed or fail on its own merit. Henry Ford also gave three suggestions to the project planners. First, the group of homes should be sufficiently different in appearance to avoid the thought that they were machine made. Second, that they be of suitable size to accommodate an average family in ample comfort. Third, the best materials be used.....

      Liebold instructed Albert Wood, an architect on the Ford Motor Company staff and chief construction engineer of the Henry Ford Hospital, to design various models to comply with Henry Ford's 'suggestions' and at a price the average working man could afford. The result was six different models designated A, B, C, D, E, and F. All were two story homes and the original six models were limited to a living room, dining room, kitchen, 3 bedrooms, a bathroom, and a porch. The only four-bedroom model, of which only 13 were built, was a replacement for the D home in the first group......

      The building of the Ford Homes began in May 1919 on Park Street. The plan was to put up 94 homes the first year. A Detroit Journal article of July 21, 1919, states that 40 homes were then under construction on the Dearborn Realty property. Between May and October the 33 houses on the south side of Park were completed and ready for occupancy. The remaining 61 homes on Nona, which had also been started in May 1919, were completed by November 1919 and were sold and occupied immediately. Albert Wood, the Ford Home architect, bought a home at 22685 Nona and lived there until 1925 and Harry C. Vicarey, head of the mechanical work on the construction, bought the home at 22645 Nona and lived there until late 1978. In 1920, from May to November the remaining 156 Ford Homes were built on Beech, Military, Francis, Edison, and Gregory....1

      1Ford Homes Historic District History by Joseph Oldenburg <https://www.fordhomes.org/fhhd_history.pdf>

  • Sources 
    1. [S599] Census - British Columbia - 1911, Vancouver.

    2. [S129] Vit - British Columbia Marriage Index.
      ALBERT GARDNER WOOD Bride: LOUISE MOYER married 20 Apr 1912 Place: VANCOUVER bca number: B11376 Registration Number: 1912-09-068812

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 2 May 1886 - New York City, New York, USA. Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - architect - 1911 - Vancouver, , British Columbia, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 20 Apr 1912 - Vancouver, , British Columbia, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 21 Aug 1973 - Port Washington, Nassau, New York, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - New York City, New York, USA. Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth