Waterloo Region Generations
A record of the people of Waterloo Region, Ontario.
Dr. Levi Bowman Clemens

Dr. Levi Bowman Clemens[1, 2, 3]

Male 1855 - 1899  (43 years)

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  • Name Levi Bowman Clemens 
    Prefix Dr. 
    Born 27 Jun 1855  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
    Gender Male 
    Residence 1861  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [11
    Mennonite 
    Residence 1871  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Mennonite 
    Occupation 1881  Hespeler (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Physician - Doctor - Dr. 
    Occupation 1883  Hespeler (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [12
    physician 
    Residence 1883  Hespeler (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Residence 1883  Hespeler (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Occupation 1891  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    Medical Doctor 
    Residence 1891  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    Not Given 
    Elected Office 1893  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    councillor - Kitchener 
    • Years Served: 1893-94, 1895-96 (Reeve), 1898 (Reeve)
    Name L. B. Clemens 
    Residence 1897  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    103 Queen St. South, Kitchener in 1907
    Kitchener,Clemens.L.B.-busyberlin1897.jpg
    Residence of Dr. L. B. Clemens - From: Busy Berlin Jubilee Souvenir 1897, published by Berlin News-Record
    Eby ID Number 00023-1822 
    Died 17 Mar 1899  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [7, 8, 10
    Cause: cerebro spinal meningitis 
    Buried Mount Hope Cemetery, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [10
    Person ID I17204  Generations
    Last Modified 16 Oct 2021 

    Father George H. Clemens,   b. 25 Jul 1831, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Jun 1892, Near, Breslau, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 60 years) 
    Mother Salome S. Bowman,   b. 26 Jul 1830, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Jun 1882, Near, Breslau, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 51 years) 
    Married 4 Feb 1851  , Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 13, 14
    Family ID F2218  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Edith Louisa Wells,   b. 21 Sep 1860, Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Jun 1897, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 36 years) 
    Married 14 Feb 1883  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 3, 7, 8, 9, 12
    Children 
     1. Levi Clemens,   b. 1885, , Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     2. Louisa Isabella Clemens,   b. 17 Aug 1886, Wellesley Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Oct 1944, , Michigan, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 58 years)
     3. Ruby Clemens,   b. 1891, , Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     4. Walter Bowman Clemens,   b. 15 Sep 1895,   d. 6 Dec 1895  (Age 0 years)
    Last Modified 16 Oct 2021 
    Family ID F4511  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Levi Clemens, M. D., "was born June 27th, 1855. His boyhood days were spent on his father's farm and in attending that old 'Riverbank' public school. When pretty well up in the 'teens' he prepared himself to pass the Teachers' examinations. Being very successful in his undertaking he engaged the Shantz Station school where he taught with marked success for some time, but in course of a few years he found the teaching profession an irksome and irremunerable one. He bid 'Adieu' to this calling and entered upon the study of medicine, and read under Dr. R. McIntyre, of Hespeler, and Dr. J. H. Webb, of the town of Waterloo, well known practitioners of the county, and attended the full course of lectures for four years at the Trinity College, Toronto, and graduated as a M. D., in 1880. Soon after graduating he located in Wellesley village where he had a good practice. Wishing to be located in some larger town, he came to Berlin in spring, 1889, where he has since gained a very large practice, thus proving to be one of our most successful doctors of the county. On February 14th, 1883, he was married to Edith, daughter of Walter Wells of Waterloo. Their family consists of two children".


      Eby, Ezra E. (1895). A biographical history of Waterloo township and other townships of the county: being a history of the early settlers and their descendants, mostly all of Pennsylvania Dutch origin: as also much other unpublished historical information chiefly of a local character. Berlin [Kitchener, Ont.]: [s.n.].

      ____________________

      On the 17th of Mar. 1899, at the Berlin Waterloo hospital, Berlin, Ont., after a very short illness of cerebro spinal meningitis, Dr. Levi Bowman Clemens, son of the late Bro. George Clemens of near Kossuth, Ont., aged 43 years, 8 months and 18 days. He was married on the 14th of Feb. 1883 to Edith Wells of Waterloo. To this union were born two children. His companion died about a year ago, also after a very short illness, and in the same hospital, an unsuccessful operation having been performed upon her. He enjoyed a very extensive practice, and his system gradually gave way under the excessive strain. He was highly esteemed by a large circle of friends, who deeply mourn his early death, but none so deeply as the two little ones now left alone to face the battle of life. May God direct their footsteps through the journey of life. Funeral on the 20th from his residence, Cor. Queen and Church Sts., Berlin. Services at the Presbyterian church by A. R. Atkinson and Noah Stauffer.

      The Herald of Truth , Vol. XXXVI, No. 8, April 15, 1899 - pages 124-126

      ___________________

      Dr. L.B. Clemens

      Great consternation was caused on Friday morning by the news that Dr. L.B. Clemens was seriously ill and lay close to death in the hospital. The doctor had visited a patient on Wednesday night, and towards morning, became so ill himself that he had to have a colleague take his place.

      His condition became worse hour by hour and he began to lose consciousness more and more. Dr. Honsberger took over his treatment and had him admitted to hospital. Dr. Baumann of Waterloo and Dr. Fraser of Stratford were called into consultation. However, there was nothing that could be done to save the seriously ill patient. From Thursday afternoon, he did not regain consciousness, and soon after 6: 30 p.m. on Friday evening, he passed away. The cause of death was "cerebral-spinal meningitis," an incurable ailment of the brain and spinal cord.

      The deceased was born near Chicopee on June 27, 1855 and was a school-teacher in Shantz Station for several years. In 1880, he graduated as a physician and began his practice in Wellesley. On February 14, 1883, he married Edith Wells of Waterloo, who, almost two years ago, died almost as suddenly as he himself. After a restorative voyage to Australia, he settled down in Berlin in 1889 and soon acquired an extensive practice.

      He took an active part in public life. He was a useful member of city council, county council, the board of trade and the health board. In 1898, he made many friends by his pleasant manner and especially, his excellent talent as a speaker. He was a member of the Presbyterian church and belonged to several clubs. He is survived by two children: girls, aged twelve and eight years, who now are alone in this world, with no father or mother.

      The burial took place on Monday afternoon at 2: 00 p.m. A large number of friends of the deceased had already gathered at his home before this time, to have a last glance at his earthly remains. The memorial service was held in the Presbyterian church, where Rev. Atkinson spoke in English and Rev. Noah Stauffer, in German. The burial took place in Mount Hope Cemetery. Pall-bearers were: E.P. Clement, C.K. Hagedorn, Jos. Bingemann, J.H. Landreth, Hy Knell, Jr. and W.V. Uttley.

      The following floral tributes were made by friends and admirers: from City Council, a large wreath; from Berlin and Waterloo physicians, a broken wheel; from Grand River Lodge No. 151, a compass; from Guelph Valley S.R.M., a triangle; from Berlin Young Liberals, a large symbal; the Berlin Reform Association, a large cushion of roses and lilies; Miss N. Ruddell, bouquet; Union Lodge, C.O.F., an anchor. Among the mourners from out of town, were the following: Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Wenger, Ayton; Mrs. A.B. Clemens, Scranton, Pa.; Mrs. M.B. Clemens, Toronto; Mrs. D.L. Bowman, Toronto; Milo B. Clemens, Rochester; Mr. and Mrs. J. Nyce, Ida, Mich.

      Berlin Journal 23 Mar 1899 Translated by: Patricia J. Kauk March 4, 2005 for the Kitchener Public Library

      _______________________


      Dr. Robert McIntyre had taken in as a partner, Dr. Levi Clemens, and they rented the Conway store and had their office in it and ran a drug store in connection with their practise, which in those days was not at all uncommon.

      Le Rue De Commerce, Other Times Other Customs Other Days Other Ways, Winfield Brewster 1954

      _____________________


      "The bright career of Dr. L.B. Clemens was closed at 6: 40 last evening, when his spirit passed to its Maker, after an illness of less than two days.

      Previous to his sudden and fatal attack, he had been enjoying his usual excellent health, and had not complained to any one of feeling unwell. He had intended to go to Stratford Friday.
      About one o'clock on Thursday morning, he was called from home to attend a confinement case. He became suddenly unwell and sent for Dr. Honsberger to assist him. The latter was unable to respond to the call, and Dr. Cline was secured, to render the necessary assistance.

      The latter gentleman reached the suffering Doctor about 5 o'clock in the morning. He found him dazed, and with his usual faculties dulled, so that he was not able to attend to the case in hand. He nerved himself sufficiently, however, to come home alone, between 9 and 10 o'clock on Friday morning. He was not rational then, and Dr. Honsberger hastily responded to the call. The patient was then delirious, and spoke only once, in response to the question asked him, that word being "Yes," when asked if he had a sore throat.

      It was with the utmost difficulty that he was roused sufficiently; and his temperature was alarmingly high. His condition grew rapidly worse and Dr. Bauman of Waterloo was called in for consultation. Both were baffled at the mysterious case, and during the afternoon the now totally unconscious Doctor was removed to the Hospital in a cab. But the patient gradually sank, and only at intervals showed moments of partial consciousness.

      Dr. J. Fraser, of Stratford, came on the 5 train, in response to a summons and after a consultation with the local attendants - at which Drs. Lackner, Noecker and McGillawee were also present, it was announced, after a thorough diagnosis, that the case was one of cerebro-spinal meningitis. All efforts to rouse him to consciousness were vain, and at 6: 40 the vital spark had fled. In the place of the genial, kind-hearted Dr. Clemens, there lay only the cold clay. There were present at the bedside the medical men, Rev. R. Atkinson, Miss Duncan and Miss Wilson of the Hospital staff, Rev. Mr. and Mrs. Hallman, the latter a sister of the deceased. The two little daughters who had been at the Hospital during the afternoon, had been removed just before.

      The cause of death was directly due to what is known as spotted fever, as shortly before the end came, dark colored spots appeared on the body. This was the conclusive and only evidence that led the physicians to arrive at a conclusion. The disease springs from a germ, and is quite epidemic, there being three other cases in town at present.

      Shortly after 10 o'clock last night a post-mortem examination was conducted by Dr. Honsberger, and attended by the other physicians, excepting Dr. Fraser, for the purpose of verifying the diagnosis.

      Samples of the brain matter were secured and will be sent to Toronto and London for pathological examination.

      The remains were removed this morning to the undertaking establishment, where they were prepared for burial.

      The case is a strange one, and it is believed that the recent train of events, coupled with overwork of professional duties, placed him in a position susceptible to disease. A few weeks ago, the deceased identified himself with the Presbyterian Church and made a profession of faith in Christ.

      Levi B. Clemens, M.D., was born June 27th, 1855. His boyhood days were spent on his father's farm and in attending that old "Riverbank" public school. When well up in his "teens" he prepared himself to pass the departmental examinations as a teacher. Being successful in his undertaking he was engaged to teach the Shantz Station school and taught with marked success for some years, but finding the teaching profession irksome and unremunerative, he bade adieu to the calling and entered upon the study of medicine, reading up under Dr. McIntyre of Hespeler and Dr. J.H. Webb of Waterloo. Afterwards he attended and took a full four years course at the Trinity Medical College, Toronto, graduating as M.D. in 1880. Soon after this he located in Wellesley village where he gained a good practice. Hard work told on his constitution and he made a trip to Australia for a rest and a change. In 1889 he located in Berlin and here had secured a good practice. The life of a busy physician is very trying. This made great exactions on his constitution and some years ago he suffered severely from rheumatism, which after convalescence frequently troubled him.

      On February 14th 1883 he married Edith, the accomplished daughter of Mr. Walter Wells of Waterloo and the union proved a most happy one. Two children blessed this union - daughters- Louie and Ruby. Early in 1897 Mrs. Clemens died, to the great sorrow of the husband, children and community. Consequently by the Doctor's demise, two young orphans are left to face the battle of life without the care and affection of their loving parents.

      During his long residence in Berlin, Dr. Clemens succeeded in winning the confidence and esteem of his fellow citizens generally. He was ingenious and honorable and his genial nature and considerate acts won and retained many friendships. He made a good record as a public man. He served the citizens of Berlin for a number of years in the town Council and for two years was reeve. Last year he was a mayoralty candidate and though unsuccessful, made a splendid run. He was President of the Board of Trade in 1896 and at the time of his death was Medical Health officer.

      In 1898 he was chosen as the Liberal candidate for the Legislature and made a strong fight against the successful candidate Dr. H.G. Lackner. He was a member of St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church and of a number of fraternal societies; among these he was a member of Grand River Lodge No. 151 A.F. & A.M. and a 32nd [degree] Scottish Rite Mason, a member of Court Union C.O.F. No. 235 and others.

      On Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock the funeral will be held, from his late residence, to St. Andrew's church for service, after which the remains will be interred in Mt. Hope Cemetery. His death is an undoubted loss to the community and his memory will be long kept green in the hearts of many friends, while his two young daughters now left without mother or father will receive the commiseration of all."

      "Berlin News Record" March 18, 1899.

      _______________________

      CLEMENS, LEVI B
      . was an outstanding native son, being prominent through his involvement in public affairs as well as in his medical career.

      He was born near Chicopee on June 27, 1855 the third son of George K. Clemens. He obtained his education locally and became a teacher, spending some years at the Shantz Station school. When he decided to enter medical school to prepare himself he studied with Dr. R. McIntyre of Hespeler and Dr. J. H. Webb of Waterloo. He graduated from Trinity University, Toronto in 1880, an event which was remarked on by the Dumfries Reformer of April 7, 1880:

      "We need hardly give the young doctor our best wishes, for we feel confident that in future his career will be marked by that success, honesty and integrity of character that has so characterised him in the past, We congratulate the profession on having gained a member who will ever be ready to uphold the honor and dignity of that noble calling".

      According to Winfield Brewster he was taken in as a partner by Jr. R. McIntyre of Hespeler. In addition to an office in the Conway store, they also ran a drug store. An announcement of his wedding in February 1883, "to Edith Wells, daughter of Dr. Wells of Waterloo, gives his location as Hespeler. His stay in Hespeler is not mentioned in later accounts of his career, but he was probably there for three or four years before moving to Wellesley.

      The date of his location in Wellesley is unknown, but as Dr. McIntyre sold his drug store in the spring of 1885, this might suggest an earlier breakup of their partnership. The only reference to his practice in Wellesley was in an item dated November 16, 1885, which said he had vaccinated 115 people in one day.

      On October 20, 1887 the Dumfries Reformer said: "Dr. Clemmens, formerly of Wellesley starts for Australia this week. He enters upon an agreement with Mr. Lyon, the well known publisher,"

      Another account however said that "hard work told on his constitution and he made a trip to Australia for a rest and a change. If the latter was the case his trip was hardly curative as he returned on August 30, 1888 suffering from a severe attack of rheumatism.

      He then settled in Berlin but presumably did not resume his practice until May 1889, at which time his card appeared in the Berliner Journal:

      Dr. L. B. Clemens, Physician, Surgeon and Accoucheur. Office and Residence South side of Queen Street between American Block and St. Peters Church.

      He built up a large and successful practice in spite of being afflicted with rheumatism, He devoted himself to other interests as well, being a member of the Town Council for a number of years, and for two years was reeve. He was active in a number of fraternal organizations, was President of the Board of Trade in 1896, and was Medical Offices of Health'at the time of his death. He was the candidate for the Ontario Legislature for the Liberal party in 1898, being defeated by Jr. K. G. Lackner by a small margin

      A newspaper account on December 11, 1894 tells of his successful treatment of a case of diphtherial croup by the use of antitoxin. He required the added weight of the opinion of Dr. Minchin to overcome the objections of the patient family. This was the first use of antitoxin in Ontario outside of Toronto, and was considered the more remarkable because of the late state of the disease when treated.

      Dr. Clemens while still a relatively young man died on March 17 1899 of cerebral spinal meningitis. He was survived by two daughters, his wife having predeceased him.

      His funeral arrangements were reported in considerable detail, the Weekly Iiews Record referring to him as one of Berlin's most esteemed citizens.

      Dr. Alexander D. Campbell, Doctors in Waterloo County 1852-1925

      __________________

      QUEEN STREET SOUTH, EAST SIDE.


      On the corner of King Street Rehscher's vaulted cellar already spoken of.

      An open space.

      A two-story rough-cast building with two-story veranda along the Queen Street front built by Martin Anthes (father of John S. Anthes) in 1835 when it was considered one of the best houses in the village. Henry Stroh purchased this house from Mr. Anthes about 1837. Jacob Stroh was born in this house. Behind it there was a garden of about an acre of land. There were 31 pine stumps on the property when Mr. Stroh took possession and these stumps had to be laboriously removed as stump- pulling machines, which came later, were not then available. The well on the lot was only nine feet deep. Henry Stroh carried on a shoe shop in his house until he entered into partnership with Carl Kranz, on King Street.

      In 1857, after he had dissolved partnership with Kranz, Henry Stroh built a one and one-half story frame building next to his house and used it as a shoe store. Mr. Stroh continued in this shoe business until 1863 when he went into partnership with Mr. Reinhold Lang, the tanner. The Queen Street shoe shop was changed to a dwelling. Later Mr. Vanderhart, a tailor, had his shop in this building and after him Carl Englehart had it as photographer. Henry Stroh sold his house to George King. Later Charles Ahrens owned it and had it moved to the corner of Shanley and Braun Streets about 1880.

      A one and one-half story frame building erected about 1837 by Jacob Kraemer, later on Frederick Street, as spoken of. Later an addition was added to the front and the building used as the local post office, with William Davidson in charge. Later George Seip purchased the building and used it as a saloon, with a bowling alley in the rear, the first bowling alley in Berlin. William Jaffray lived in the house for a time and later William Knell, son-in-law of Mr. Seip.

      A one and one-half story frame building, originally a cooper shop, later the dwelling of Mr. Seip, after he sold the other building. In 1860 he built a brewery, known as Seip's brewery. Under the whole building he had a vaulted cellar built of field stone. Power for the brewery was supplied by a horse-power contained in an attached shed, shelter for the horses. Seip had a high reputation for good beer. He at first made his own malt, but later purchased it. After George Seip's death his son Louis continued the business until about 1880. The building was finally torn down to make room for the present auditorium.

      The cooper shop, a small one story building, with brick chimney such as coopers used to heat staves for their barrel making, operated by Henry Brickner who later had his shop at the corner of Young and King Streets. Later Adam Stein had the Queen Street cooper shop. The Berlin coopers were experts in the making of what was called tight-wear,that is water-tight barrels, in large tuns which they made for the brewers.

      A very early building, occupied by John Peters, a cabinet maker in Hoffman's factory, about 1860. The building had an outside stairway at the back. Peters was a bird lover and expert in trapping native song birds, mocking birds, cat birds, finches, etc., which he hung under his veranda roof in public display.

      On the corner of Church Street a frame house occupied by Mr. Knechtel, a weaver, about 1842-1850. Knechtel moved to a farm in Mannheim where later he was injured in the spine by a falling tree to such an extent that he was bedfast for fourteen or fifteen years. He lived to about 1871. Conrad Doering occupied the Queen Street house for a time. He also was a weaver and made coverlets, etc. The house was torn down to make room for the present one of brick built by Dr. Clemens and later occupied by the late Dr. Walters.

      Church Street.

      On the south side St. Paul's Lutheran Church.

      A one and one-half story unpainted frame building with gable towards the street, the dwelling, about 1860, of John Fleischauer, a laborer, a native of Hessen, Germany.

      A one and one-half story house occupied by E. Kern, cabinet maker, about 1860 and later by John Ansted.

      A vacant lot.

      George Street.

      Joseph Schneider originally owned all the land between George Street and Mill Street, mostly woods at that time, and extending to Benton and Eby Streets.


      REMINISCENCES OF BERLIN (NOW KITCHENER) By JACOB STROH Contributed by Joseph M. Snyder.

      Part I. Settlement - Early Villagers and Buildings, Waterloo Historical Society Annual Volume 1930


  • Sources 
    1. [S3] Book - Vol I A Biographical History of Waterloo Township and other townships of the county : being a history of the early settlers and their descendants, mostly all of Pennsylvania Dutch origin..., 430.

    2. [S3] Book - Vol I A Biographical History of Waterloo Township and other townships of the county : being a history of the early settlers and their descendants, mostly all of Pennsylvania Dutch origin..., 103.

    3. [S7] News - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Berliner Journal (1859-1917), 22 Feb 1883.
      Feb. 14, 1883 Dr. Levi B. Clemens of Hespeler and Edith Louise Wells of Waterloo were married in Berlin by Pastor T. W. Türk

    4. [S299] Census - ON, Waterloo, Hespeler - 1881, Page 27.

    5. [S604] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo South - 1871, Div. 1, Pg. 60.

    6. [S2] Church Records - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Church of the New Jerusalem (Swedenborgian).
      Name: Levi Bowman Clemens Age: 27 res: Hespeler Place of Birth: Waterloo Tp. Names of Parents: George H. Clemens & Salome Bowman Name: Edith Louisa Wells Age: 22 res: Waterloo Town Place of Birth: Waterloo Town Names of Parents: Walter Wells & Isabella Thyson Name: Dr. N. Mcphatter res: Guelph Name: Claton Wells res: Waterloo Date of Marriage: Feb. 14, 1883

    7. [S32] News - Herald of Truth, April 15, 1899 - Obituary of Levi Bowman Clemens.

    8. [S7] News - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Berliner Journal (1859-1917), Obituary of L. B. Clemens - 23 Mar 1899.

    9. [S1592] Census - ON, Waterloo, Berlin - 1891, Sec. 5 Page 58.

    10. [S166] Cemetery - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Mount Hope CC#4508 Internet Link .
      In memoriam/ Levi Bowman Clemens M.D./ born June 27, 1855/ died March 17, 1899/ his wife/ Edith Louise Wells/ born Sept. 21, 1860/ died June 10, 1897/ their son/ Walter Bowman Clemens/ born Sept. 15, 1895/ died Dec. 6, 1895/ Clemens/
      (A) L.B.C. (B) E.L.C.

    11. [S2653] aaaaWaterloo Twp. 1861, Sect. 7 Page 51.

    12. [S4] Vit - ON - Marriage Registration, 12163-83.
      12163-83 Levi Bowman CLEMENS, 27, physician, Canada, Hespeler, s/o George H. & Salome Bowman CLEMENS, married Edith Louisa WELLS, 22, Canada, Waterloo, d/o Walter & Isabella Tyson WELLS, witn: Dr. N. McPHATTER of Guelph & Clayton WELLS of Waterloo, 14 Feb 1883 at Berlin

    13. [S3] Book - Vol I A Biographical History of Waterloo Township and other townships of the county : being a history of the early settlers and their descendants, mostly all of Pennsylvania Dutch origin..., 429.

    14. [S32] News - Herald of Truth, July 15, 1892 - Obituary of George H. Clemens.

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 27 Jun 1855 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - Mennonite - 1861 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - Mennonite - 1871 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Physician - Doctor - Dr. - 1881 - Hespeler (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - physician - 1883 - Hespeler (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1883 - Hespeler (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1883 - Hespeler (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 14 Feb 1883 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Medical Doctor - 1891 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - Not Given - 1891 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsElected Office - councillor - Kitchener - 1893 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1897 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Cause: cerebro spinal meningitis - 17 Mar 1899 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Mount Hope Cemetery, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth