Waterloo Region Generations
A record of the people of Waterloo Region, Ontario.
Elias Weber Bingeman Snider, MPP

Elias Weber Bingeman Snider, MPP[1, 2, 3]

Male 1842 - 1921  (78 years)

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  • Name Elias Weber Bingeman Snider 
    Suffix MPP 
    Born 19 Jun 1842  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13
    Gender Male 
    Business Union Mills - William Snider & Co., Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Union Mills 
    Business Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Waterloo Distillery & flouring mill 
    Waterloo-WaterlooDisilleryandFlouringMill-0001-sketch.jpg
    Waterloo-WaterlooDisilleryandFlouringMill-0001-sketch.jpg
    Town of Waterloo, Street: King , Occupation: general merchant & proprietor Waterloo Distillery & flouring mill
    Occupation 1861  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [11
    Miller 
    Residence 1864  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [14
    Occupation 1871  Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Miller 
    Snider, E. W. B.jpg
    Snider, E. W. B.jpg
    Occupation 1881  Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    Merchant Miller 
    Business 1887  Bricker & Co., Waterloo, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Waterloo Foundry 
    • Also known as Waterloo Foundry and Waterloo Manufacturing Company
    Waterloo-WaterlooFoundry-0001-1887Directory.JPG
    Waterloo-WaterlooFoundry-0001-1887Directory.JPG
    The Union Publishing Co.'s Farmers' and Business Directory for the Counties of Waterloo and Wellington 1887, Vol. 3
    Interesting pioneer, story, mill, education, politics, business 
    Name E. W. B. Snider 
    Occupation 1891  Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [12
    Miller 
    Religion 1891  Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [12
    Miller 
    Occupation 1901  Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Miller 
    Occupation 1911  Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [10
    Miller 
    Religion 1911  Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [10
    Evangelical Association 
    Occupation 1916  St. Jacobs, Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [15
    miller 
    Waterloo-EandCSniderFlourMerchants-0002.jpg
    Waterloo-EandCSniderFlourMerchants-0002.jpg
    Waterloo-EandCSniderFlourMerchants-0003.jpg
    Waterloo-EandCSniderFlourMerchants-0003.jpg
    St. Jacobs-PioneerRollerFlouringMills,-E.W.B.Snider-001.jpg
    St. Jacobs-PioneerRollerFlouringMills,-E.W.B.Snider-001.jpg
    Occupation 1921  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [13
    President, ? 
    Religion 1921  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [13
    Evangelical 
    Residence 1921  181 Frederick St., Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [13
    Eby ID Number 00106-5853 
    Died 1921  [7
    Buried Calvary United Brethern Cemetery, St. Jacobs, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    Person ID I19540  Generations
    Last Modified 21 Jan 2020 

    Father Rev. Elias Snider,   b. 3 Sep 1815, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Apr 1890, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years) 
    Mother Hannah Bingeman,   b. 1 Aug 1815, , Montgomery Co., Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Dec 1893  (Age 78 years) 
    Married 10 Nov 1835  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 16, 17
    Family ID F1844  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Nancy Weber,   b. 11 Nov 1842, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Nov 1912, Battle Creek, Calhoun, Michigan, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years) 
    Married 19 Apr 1864  , Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 4, 14
    Children 
     1. Clara W. Snider,   b. 10 Mar 1865, St. Jacobs, Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1942  (Age 76 years)
     2. Aldred Snider,   b. 28 Oct 1866, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     3. Cranston W. Snider,   b. 22 Apr 1868, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     4. Fernando Snider,   b. 30 Apr 1870, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     5. William W. Snider,   b. 25 Feb 1872, St. Jacobs, Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     6. Edwin Snider,   b. 5 Apr 1874, St. Jacobs, Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     7. Elias W. Snider,   b. 8 May 1876, St. Jacobs, Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1950  (Age 73 years)
     8. Cranson Snider,   b. 1878, , Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     9. Ada Snider,   b. 10 Sep 1878, St. Jacobs, Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1966  (Age 87 years)
     10. Franklin Snider,   b. 5 May 1880, St. Jacobs, Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 May 1880, St. Jacobs, Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
     11. Ella Lola Snider,   b. 19 Apr 1881, St. Jacobs, Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1933  (Age 51 years)
     12. Amy Florence Snider,   b. 18 Jan 1883, St. Jacobs, Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Mar 1976, St. Jacobs, Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 93 years)
    Last Modified 22 Jan 2020 
    Family ID F4678  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Ellen Shoemaker,   b. 5 Aug 1862, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1950  (Age 87 years) 
    Married 5 Feb 1916  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [15
    Last Modified 22 Jan 2020 
    Family ID F6586  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 Emma,   b. 1862, , Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Last Modified 22 Jan 2020 
    Family ID F243200  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Snider, Elias Weber Bingeman 1842.jpg
    Snider, Elias Weber Bingeman 1842.jpg
    Snider, Elias Weber Bingeman home in St. Jacobs.jpg
    Snider, Elias Weber Bingeman home in St. Jacobs.jpg
    https://ca.geocities.com/stjacobsrr@rogers.com/sniderhouse2.jpg
    Snider, Elias Weber Bingeman home in St. Jacobs 2.jpg
    Snider, Elias Weber Bingeman home in St. Jacobs 2.jpg
    https://ca.geocities.com/stjacobsrr@rogers.com/sniderhouse2.jpg
    Elias B. Snider
    Elias B. Snider
    https://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~clemens/K-WFam/pages/34_Elias%20Bingeman%20Snider_jpg.htm
    Elias Weber Bingeman Snider
    Elias Weber Bingeman Snider

  • Notes 
    • Elias W. B. Snider, "was born June 19th, 1842. On April 19th, 1864, he was married to Nancy Weber. Mr. Snider is a miller by trade. In 1865 he took possession of the German Mills where he was engaged in doing a well paying business. In March, 1871, he purchased the St. Jacobs Mills where he has been doing an extensive and successful business ever since. Some years ago he also purchased the New Dundee Mills and has since been conducting both mills with the greatest of success. Besides being the proprietor of the two large mills, he has large interests in various other lines of business. In politics Mr. Snider favors the principles of the Liberal Party whose representative he has been in the Local House from June, 1881, (after Mr. Springer's resignation) until the dissolution of that body in 1894 when he declined to be again the standard bearer of the Liberal Party. He resides in St. Jacobs, Ontario. His family consists of the following children"


      Eby, Ezra E. (1895). A biographical history of Waterloo township and other townships of the county: being a history of the early settlers and their descendants, mostly all of Pennsylvania Dutch origin: as also much other unpublished historical information chiefly of a local character. Berlin [Kitchener, Ont.]: [s.n.].

      _________________________

      ELIAS WEBER BINGEMAN, miller, manufacturer, and politician; b. 19 June 1842 in Waterloo, Upper Canada, third son of Elias Snider and Hannah Bingeman; m. first 19 April 1864 Nancy Weber (d. 1912) in Preston (Cambridge), Upper Canada, and they had seven sons and four daughters (one son died in infancy); m. secondly 1915 Helen Shoemaker; d. 15 Oct. 1921 in Kitchener, Ont.

      E. W. B. Snider left public school at the age of 12 to work on the family farm, but he shared his father's interest in milling and in 1860 began a two-year apprenticeship at the family's flour operation in German Mills (Kitchener). On its completion he became the manager of the mill and in 1864 he made an arrangement with his father to run it on a "shares" basis, which would allow him a measure of the profits. The Sniders expanded their holdings in 1868 to include a small mill at Berlin (Kitchener), but in 1871 Elias Jr set out on his own, purchasing a mill in St Jacobs. There he became the first Canadian to introduce roller milling to the industry. On the advice of John Braun (Brown), a former employee, he purchased a roller system from the Hoerde company of Vienna in 1875. This Walzenstuhle process replaced millstones with a slower but more efficient system of small rollers. The resulting product, which Snider called Walzen flour, represented a dramatic improvement in quality over traditionally milled flour and Snider was able to sell it widely, not only in Ontario but also in eastern Canada, the northeastern United States, and Britain. In 1876 he acquired a second mill, in New Dundee, where he also installed rollers. By the mid 1880s this operation and his Pioneer Roller Flouring Mill in St Jacobs were together producing 250 barrels a day.

      The roller milling system was an early example of Snider's fascination with new technology and commercial opportunity. In 1884 he was attracted to the foundry business and purchased a works in Waterloo from Jacob Bricker, which he operated with Bricker's son Levi. Four years later the business was incorporated as the Waterloo Manufacturing Company Limited, with Snider and Absalom Merner, another foundry owner, as the major partners. This firm, of which Snider was president, would become famous for the manufacture of agricultural implements. The company expanded Jacob Bricker's line of threshers and retained his Champion trade mark. It also began to make steam traction engines under the Lion Brand trade name. The 1890s and the ensuing decade were good years for the company in the very competitive agricultural machinery business in Canada. By 1908 it employed 150 men and had 15 travelling salesmen, as well as branch offices in Winnipeg and Regina. Developing technology would restrict its success, however. The introduction of the gasoline tractor led to the replacement of steam as the motive power in agriculture by about 1925. Snider and his firm experimented with a gasoline tractor, but the expense, and American competition, caused them to abandon the project. In the early 1920s, after Snider's death, the introduction of an effective, reasonably priced combine harvester on the prairies threatened the company's future even more; it replaced both the tractor and the thresher, and thereby eliminated Waterloo Manufacturing's main markets. Snider's sons, now in control of the company, sold the firm to Playfair and Company of Toronto in 1927.

      From 1881 to 1894 Snider had sat as a Liberal for Waterloo North in the Ontario legislature. He concentrated on expanding municipal powers through his work on municipal assessment and a municipal fire insurance act. Later in his term he became interested in forest preservation and lobbied for the creation of reserves. He would maintain this interest long after leaving politics, publishing an article on the depletion of forests in Waterloo County in the report of the Waterloo Historical Society in 1918. In the federal election of 1896 Snider ran against Conservative Joseph Emm Seagram* in Waterloo North. This was an industrial riding and Snider, though himself a protectionist, bore the cross of the Liberals' free trade policy. The local Conservative paper called on him to "be a man." "Declare that you will either support [Wilfrid Laurier*] and Free Trade or Joseph Seagram and Protection." The voters preferred Seagram.

      Snider experienced success in the manufacturing and milling fields. He also dabbled in railway promotion, with the Waterloo Junction Railway, and the sugar-beet industry. Among his other interests were the Toronto Foundry (later the Anthes Foundry), the Snider Lumber Company of Waterloo Limited, which operated mills at Gravenhurst, and the Canada Felting Company Limited of St Jacobs.

      Snider is best known for his role in the introduction of public electricity to Ontario. An early convert to the benefits of electricity, in 1894 he had installed a generator at his mill in St Jacobs which also provided power to homes in the town. In 1900 he joined with Daniel Bechtel Detweiler and Joseph Bingeman to form a company to generate power for mines north of Lake Superior. The Michipicoten Falls Power Company Limited was an early success and convinced Snider of the importance of hydroelectric power for industry. In February 1902 he called upon business and community leaders in the area around Berlin to meet and discuss the most effective way to ensure that power generated at Niagara Falls would be made available to businesses and homes in the province. A subsequent meeting in June struck a committee, chaired by Snider, to consider the matter. Snider and Detweiler, the publicist, researcher, and jack-of-all-trades for the venture, spoke to many municipal and business leaders as well as to the Niagara power companies. At a further meeting in February 1903 it was decided to lobby the provincial government either to build transmission lines as a public work or to authorize the municipalities to do so. The government of George William Ross* responded with legislation enabling local governments to proceed. On 12 August Snider became the chair of the Ontario Power Commission, which represented seven municipalities and whose members included London mayor Adam Beck and other leaders. Its report in March 1906 recommended that a cooperative of municipalities construct and operate both a generating and a transmission system for Niagara hydroelectric power. The report was, however, superseded by that of a second commission, appointed in 1905 by the new government of James Pliny Whitney* and chaired by Beck; its recommendation in April 1906 of a provincially owned system carried the day. Four years later Premier Whitney went to Berlin to throw the switch that launched Ontario's hydroelectric system. Snider's role in this development faded from public memory, replaced in great measure by Beck's. In the early 1930s his son William Weber began to lobby the provincial government of George Stewart Henry* to recognize Snider's contribution. This campaign eventually resulted in 1956 in a monument to Snider at St Jacobs and in official recognition from the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario.

      Snider died in 1921 in Kitchener, where he had gone to live after his second marriage. A member of the Evangelical Association, he was laid to rest in the St Jacobs cemetery. He had enjoyed great success in his life by embracing new technology: a new method of milling flour, new machinery for agriculture, and a new system for delivering electricity.
      Andrew Thomson


      E. W. B. Snider's article "Waterloo forests and primitive economics" appears in Waterloo Hist. Soc., Annual report (Kitchener, Ont.), 6 (1918): 14--36.
      Kitchener Public Library, Rare Books Dept., MC 5.4 (Dan Detweiler papers); MC 6.17 (E. W. B. Snider papers); E. W. B. Snider file.
      Ontario Agricultural Museum (Milton, Ont.), Waterloo Manufacturing Company coll.
      Kitchener Daily Record, 17 Oct. 1921.
      John English and Kenneth McLaughlin, Kitchener: an illustrated history (Waterloo, 1983).
      Neil Freeman, "Turn-of-the-century state intervention: creating the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario, 1906," OH, 84 (1992): 171-94.
      F. L. Leung, Grist and flour mills in Ontario: from millstones to rollers, 1780s--1880s (Ottawa, 1981).
      H. V. Nelles, The politics of development: forests, mines & hydro-electric power in Ontario, 1849--1941 (Toronto, 1974).
      Elliott Richmond, "E. W. B. Snider," Waterloo Hist. Soc., Annual report, 9 (1921): 183--88.
      W. A. Schmidt, "The Waterloo Manufacturing Co. Limited," Waterloo Hist. Soc., Annual report, 75 (1987): 16-23.
      H. S. Turner and R. W. Irwin, Ontario's threshing machine industry: a short history of these pioneer companies and their contribution to Ontario agriculture (Guelph, Ont., 1974).
      G. M. Winder, "Following America into corporate capitalism: technology and organization of the Ontario agricultural implements industry to 1930" (phd thesis, Univ. of Toronto, 1991)


      Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online 2000 University of Toronto/Université Laval

      _________________________-


      E. W. B. Snider

      Elias Weber Bingeman Snider was born in the town of Waterloo on June 19th, 1842. His parents were Rev. Elias Snider and Hannah Bingeman. His father was interested in farming, and in flour and saw mills in Waterloo town and township. He was a member of the Mennonite Church, in which he was ordained to the ministry in 1874, when quite an elderly man. Associated with Jacob Y. Shantz and others, Elias Snider took great interest in getting Russian Mennonites to settle in Manitoba, from 1872 to 1874.

      A most interesting heirloom, now in the possession of Mr. W. W. Snider, an old Swiss Family Bible, printed in 1560, and purchased by Johannes Schneider in 1564 in Switzerland, records that a descendant, a Johannes Schneider, emigrated to Pennsylvania, then a British colony, in 1736. Mr. Snider's great grandfather was born in Pennsylvania in 1758, and emigrated to Canada in 1806, locating in Waterloo township, then nothing but a wilderness.

      Mr. Snider received the rudiments of a public school education, but started to work on his father's farm, near Waterloo town, at the age of 12 years, and continued there until his 18th year. In 1860 he began his apprenticeship in his father's flour mill at German Mills, and made himself so familiar with the details of the business, that when he was 20 years old he was promoted to be manager of the mill. In October of 1864 he arranged with his father to run the German Mills on shares, which was continued for some seven years. In January, 1871, Mr. Snider ventured out for himself by purchasing the flour mill at St. Jacobs, where he removed his young family, and where he continued to make his home for some 44 years. Previous to moving to St. Jacobs, Mr. Snider had in his employ a miller by the name of John Braun, of German extraction, who furnished Mr. Snider with a great deal of information regarding milling processes then existing in Austria and Germany. From a business friend, Mr. W. M. Stark, of Toronto, Mr. Snider received further information, as also his first samples, milled in Hungary, of the roller process flour. With this knowledge the keen perception of Mr. Snider foresaw the great possibilities that were open to those who would lead in the transformation of the milling industry from the short process of grinding with mill-stones, to the gradual reduction system, as by the Roller Process, which patience, time, and hard work were to make possible.

      Contributed by Mr. Elliott Richmond, of St. Jacobs.

      With this object in view, Mr. Snider early in the year 1875 corresponded with the firm of Hoerde and Co., of Vienna, Austria, and on April 26th of the same year, placed the order for what was (as far as known) the first Roller Process machine which was imported into America. This machine was shipped on Sept. 22, 1875, via Hamburg, Germany, to Guelph, Ont., reached its destination on October 20th, 1875, and was installed in the St. Jacobs flour mill. The price of the machine was £114, 11s, ld, with freight charges of £16, 13s, 5d, and a duty of $57.64.

      The German name for the machine was "Walzenstuhle," and from this name Mr. Snider appropriated the title "Walzen" for his choicest brand of flour, which for many years commanded the best prices in many markets. This flour proved of such good quality and so superior to the old stone process that an extraordinary demand was created, not only in Ontario and the Maritime Provinces, but also in the New England States, and for export.

      It must not be assumed that the importation of this machine from Austria overcame the flour-milling problems. It only opened up greater possibilities. Improvements were the order of the day for years to come, and Mr. Snider, ever on the alert for further advancement, always installed the latest improved machinery. For this reason a staff of mil-wrights was constantly employed, and while the flour-milling industry was the nucleus of Mr. Snider's fortune, it can be truthfully said that many fortunes had to be sacrificed in the transition stages of the industry in the scrapping of machinery, as what was installed one year proved obsolete a year or two later.

      One instance of the pioneer miller's difficulties may be cited. The object of the miller was to produce more and more good quality middlings, or "grits" as it was called in the early days, from which the best white flour was made. In those days there were no elevators to lift and discharge the products from the various machines, and the product was caught in bags, and put through the same machine five or six times before the reduction was of the right fineness for the best quality of flour. In other cases the product was caught in bags in the basement of the mill and carried up several flights of steps, and poured into a hopper feeding the next machine. To transform the milling industry from this primitive stage through all its phases to present conditions, was a stupendous task, and many millers fell by the wayside in the struggle, but those whose vision was clear and efforts tireless were amply re-warded. That Mr. Snider made a success of his flour-milling operations is well known and needs no comment.

      After the transition period from the stone to the roller process from about 1875 to 1895, milling machinery became more or less standardized, and the fundamental principles being laid only minor changes have been made since that time. In 1884 Mr. Snider embarked upon another enterprise when he bought the foundry in Waterloo from Jacob Bricker, and entered into a co-partnership with Levi Bricker, which continued to 1894. At this time arrange-ments were made between E. W. B. Snider and Absalom Merner and others to incorporate the Waterloo Manufac-turing Company, amalgamating the Bricker foundry and the Merner foundries in Waterloo and Elmira. Mr. Snider was chosen President of the new company and held the position continuously until his death. The business has been gradually concentrated on King St., Waterloo, where the Bricker plant has been greatly enlarged, and where from 150 to 200 men are employed in the manufacture and sale of engines and threshing machinery.

      In the early days all the products of the St. Jacobs mill had to be teamed to Waterloo station, and to overcome that haul Mr. Snider promoted the Waterloo Junction Railway, now a part of the Grand Trunk System. Among other interests during his active career he was president of the Anthes Foundry, Toronto; president of the Snider Lumber Co., Gravenhurst; vice-president of the Ontario Sugar Co., Kitchener, in 1904; director of the Niagara Peninsula Power and Gas Co., St. Catharines; but perhaps the greatest achievement of which his friends are justly proud, was the part he had in originating our present hydro power system. He may well be termed "the Father of Hydro Power," for at the banquet of the Waterloo Board of Trade on Feb. 11th, 1902, Mr. Snider predicted that the majority of those present would see the day when our streets and homes would be lighted, and the machinery of our factories supplied, with power generated at Niagara Falls. The prediction was received with a skeptical smile by many present, but we have lived to see the vision more than realized. In the meantime Mr. Snider did a great deal of preliminary investigating regarding the developing, transmitting, and distributing of Niagara power, and the Ontario Power Act, passed June 4th, during the session of 1903, gave municipalities power to act along these lines. Accordingly representatives from some nineteen munici-palities met in Berlin July 9th, 1903, and after a thorough discussion they appointed a committee consisting of E. W. B. Snider, chairman, R. MacGregor, A. Beck, P. W. Ellis, C. H. Waterous, G. McLagan and L. Goldie. This com- mittee met in Toronto July 16th and decided to ask all municipalities interested to send delegates to meet them at the City Hall, Toronto, August 12th, 1903. This was really the organization meeting of "The Ontario Power Commission," of which Mr. Snider was chairman and J. C. Haight, secretary. Meetings were held from time to time during the next three years and the interest grew apace. The last meeting of the Commission was held at 7 to 9 King St. East, Toronto, Sept. 20th, 1906, when at its conclusion, on motion of W. F. Cockshutt and P. W. Ellis, a hearty vote of thanks was tendered the chairman, Mr. Snider, for the assistance and guidance which he had rendered to the Commission as its presiding officer, and for the very large share he had contributed towards making the work of the Commission a success. From that time the work was taken up by the Ontario Government, and "E. W. B." remained an ardent observer of the success it has been.

      Being a very busy man commercially, Mr. Snider yet found time to be interested in the municipal affairs of his native county, and although never a member of a municipal board, we find him active in a wider sphere as Liberal member for North Waterloo in the Provincial Legislature for 13 years, 1881 to 1894, when he declined renomination. During his parliamentary term at Toronto his interests centered around a Municipal Fire Insurance Bill, an amendment to the Assessment Act and to Forest Reservation and Preservation. In the noted election of 1896, Mr. Snider upheld the cause of Liberalism in North Waterloo in a contest for the Dominion Parliament, against the late Joseph E. Seagram, in which he was unsuccessful.

      Mr. Snider's varied interests often took him far afield, yet he was a real home man, fond of domestic and cultural accomplishments, sociable, and approachable on any subject tinged with human welfare. On the 19th of April, 1864, he married Nancy Weber at Preston and resided at German Mills until they moved to St. Jacobs in 1871. Of this there survive ten out of eleven children, seven sons and four daughters - Clara, Aldred, Cranson, Fernando, William, Edwin, Elias, Ada, Franklin (deceased), Lola and Amy. Mrs. Snider died in 1912. In 1915 Mr. Snider married Helen Shoemaker and took up his residence at 181 Frederick St., Kitchener, where he kept up an active interest in his business, social and religious relationships to the last. One of his last public contributions was an elaborate article on "Waterloo County Forests and Primitive Economics," which appeared in the 1918 Report of the Waterloo Historical Society, and during the last few months of his life he devoted considerable attention to the matter of erecting a suitable monument to the memory of the first pioneers of 'Waterloo County, who are buried near Doon. He died at his home in Kitchener on Saturday evening, October 15th, 1921, after about two weeks' illness, in his 80th year. A great concourse of friends and relatives paid tribute to his memory at the funeral services held in Zion Evangelical Church, Kitchener, on Wednesday after-noon, October 19th. Interment was in Calvary Church Cemetery, St. Jacobs, amid the scenes he loved best.

      E. W. B. Snider had vision as well as courage, initiative and faith in his native land. He gave a large measure of valuable citizenship to Canada during a long term of 60 years of business and public life. Replete with good acts, and of sympathetic nature, his life was an inspiration to those who knew. him best; and to a wider circle it was the mainspring of a prodgious undertaking in behalf of the public.


      By courtesy of Mr. W. M. Stark the substance of a letter from him, regarding Mr. Snider and the roller mill process, here follows:
      Stark Bros. & Co., Flour and Grain Merchants, Toronto, January 12, 1922.


      In the year 1871 I was sent out to this office from our London, England, firm to establish a flour business with Canada. About 1872, while on a visit to the Rev. Mr. Boyd, of Crosshill, I was introduced to Mr. E. W. B. Snider of St. Jacobs, where he was running a mill. As our London firm, Stark & Bruce, represented in Great Britain some half dozen of the big flour mills of Vienna and Budapest, I brought out to this country samples of their flour, which was the finest product known up to that date, and when I showed these samples to Mr. Snider he became so interested that he wanted to know from me what mills made the flours and what their process was. I mentioned that they were all roller mills, and gave him the address of several of them. Eventually he received a Milling Journal giving him the information required, wrote to the manufacturers of the milling machinery, and duly im-ported the machinery. He experimented with it for some time before he could get it to work and then succeeded in producing a flour very much superior to what he had hitherto been able to make on the stones, and I was able to get considerable of his product for shipment to our London firm. I believe he was the first miller on this continent to import rolls. I visited the big mills in Minneapolis a short time after and they had nothing of that nature; they still ground on stones.

      I may say that I knew Mr. E. W. B. Snider for many years and thought him one of the most progressive business men in Canada. He seemed to be the first to take up any new scheme and invariably succeeded in his efforts. I considered him one of the most modest, unassuming and strictly honest men that I have met in this country.

      Ninth Annual Report of the Waterloo Historical Society, Kitchener, Ontario 1921 pg 183 - 188

      ____________________________

      E. W. B. SNIDER, M.P.P., of St. Jacob's, is a son of Elias Snider. who was among the early residents of Waterloo Village, where the subject of our sketch was born in 1842. After arriving at manhood he spent a number of years operating the extensive milling establishment at German Mills, Waterloo Township; but about ten years since he purchased the large mills at St. Jacob's, which he has conducted with success ever since, in connection with other mills in New Dundee. Mr. Snider has spared sufficient time from business affairs to become familiar with the leading political problems, and to keep himself fully abreast of the times in his information on all public topics. Has taken a leading and practical interest in the various political campaigns the county, on the Liberal side of the question, and in June last was nominated and elected by that party to the seat in the Ontario Legislature rendered vacant by the resignation of Moses Springer, the former member.

      Illustrated Atlas of the County of Waterloo, H. Parsell & Co., Toronto, Ont. 1881

      _____________________

      Waterloo Foundry, Bricker & Co., King Street, Waterloo - Was established by Mr. Jacob Bricker, father of the present senior member of the firm. It was started in a comparatively small way, and it required untiring exertions and a lively spirit of enterprise to build it up to important proportions; but those qualities were not wanting, as the result achieved testified. The business is now conducted by Messrs. Levi Bricker and E.W.B. Snider, under the firm title of Bricker & Co. The 38 years that have passed since the founding of the business have seen many extensions in the buildings to accommodate the increasing trade, until to-day their extent is as follows: Main building, 45x100 feet in dimensions and two stories in height; moulding shop and engine room, 50x80 feet, one story; blacksmiths' shop, 30x40 feet, one story; paint shop, 30x50 feet, one story frame; and implement shed, 34x100 feet, one story frame. In these employment is furnished to 40 skilled and competent workmen. The firm manufactures a general line of agricultural implements, including reapers, mowers, binders, threshers and hay binders, besides general job work and repairing. The work turned out at this foundry is of the very best description, superior in quality and perfect in finish, which has been the main cause in building up and retaining their extensive trade. The annual output of the concern is over $40,000. Both members of the firm are natives of Canada; Mr. Bricker, the senior member, being the practical man and supervising the work, while Mr. Snider attends to the financial and business affairs, the latter gentleman being a representative of the North Riding of Waterloo in the Local House. The industry they conduct is alike creditable to themselves and the town of Waterloo.

      Industries of Canada Historical and Commercial Sketches Hamilton and Environs 1886

      _____________________


  • Sources 
    1. [S3] Book - Vol I A Biographical History of Waterloo Township and other townships of the county : being a history of the early settlers and their descendants, mostly all of Pennsylvania Dutch origin..., 268.

    2. [S10] Book - Vol II A Biographical History of Waterloo Township and other townships of the county : being a history of the early settlers and their descendants, mostly all of Pennsylvania Dutch origin..., 587.

    3. [S7] News - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Berliner Journal (1859-1917), 13 May 1880.
      May 8, 1880 Franklin Schneider, infant son of E.W.B. Schneider, died in St. Jacobs at age of 3 days.

    4. [S3] Book - Vol I A Biographical History of Waterloo Township and other townships of the county : being a history of the early settlers and their descendants, mostly all of Pennsylvania Dutch origin..., 271.

    5. [S148] Census - ON, Waterloo, Woolwich - 1901, Woolwich F-3 Page 16.

    6. [S144] Census - ON, Waterloo, Woolwich - 1871, Div 4, Page 67.

    7. [S232] Cemetery - ON, Waterloo, Woolwich - Calvary United St. Jacobs 4585 Cemetery Internet Link.
      E. W. B. Snider / Born 1842 / Died 1921 / At Rest /

    8. [S131] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo Twp. - 1851, Div 3 Pg 17.

    9. [S130] Census - ON, Waterloo, Woolwich - 1881, Div. 1 Page 51.

    10. [S348] Census - ON, Waterloo, Woolwich - 1911, Div. 16 Page 17.

    11. [S1943] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo North - 1861, Div. 10 Page 79.

    12. [S1821] Census - ON, Waterloo, Woolwich - 1891, Section 3 Page 32.

    13. [S2240] aaaa Census Kitchener 1921 Sub Dist. 28, Sub District 28 Page 14.

    14. [S7] News - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Berliner Journal (1859-1917), 28 Apr 1864.
      Apr. 19, 1864 Elias Schneider Jr. and Nancy Weber, both of Waterloo Tp., by Rev. Wurster

    15. [S4] Vit - ON - Marriage Registration.
      Ellen Shoemaker Age: 53 Est. Birth: abt 1863 Father: Alex Shoemaker Mother: Susanah (Webor)Shoemaker married Elias W. B. Snider Age:: 73 Est. Birth: abt 1843 Father: Elias Snider Mother: Hannah (Bingman)Snider married 5 Feb 1916 Marriage Place: Waterloo, Berlin

    16. [S16] Bible - Genealogical Information in the Bibles of the Waterloo Historical Society, Elias Schneider and Hannah Bingeman Family Bible.

    17. [S9] News - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Canada Museum und Allgemeine Zeitung (1835-1840), 12 Nov 1835:12.
      last Tuesday Rev B. Eby m. Elias Schneider (son of Jacob Schneider, miller) to Hannah Bingeman, both of Waterloo.

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 19 Jun 1842 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBusiness - Union Mills - - Union Mills - William Snider & Co., Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBusiness - Waterloo Distillery & flouring mill - - Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Miller - 1861 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1864 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 19 Apr 1864 - , Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Miller - 1871 - Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Merchant Miller - 1881 - Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBusiness - Waterloo Foundry - 1887 - Bricker & Co., Waterloo, Ontario Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Miller - 1891 - Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsReligion - Miller - 1891 - Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Miller - 1901 - Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Miller - 1911 - Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsReligion - Evangelical Association - 1911 - Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - miller - 1916 - St. Jacobs, Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 5 Feb 1916 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - President, ? - 1921 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsReligion - Evangelical - 1921 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Calvary United Brethern Cemetery, St. Jacobs, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth