Waterloo Region Generations
A record of the people of Waterloo Region, Ontario.
Dr. John Scott

Dr. John Scott[1]

Male 1814 - 1856  (42 years)

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  • Name John Scott 
    Prefix Dr. 
    Born 25 Jan 1814  Lilliesleaf, , Roxburgh, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3, 4
    Gender Male 
    Immigration 1834  Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 1834  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Occupation 1851  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    medical doctor and coroner 
    Elected Office 1852  , Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Warden 
    Elected Office 1856  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Reeve 
    Died 21 Dec 1856  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 6, 7
    Cause: consumption 
    Occupation Bef 1859  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    Doctor 
    Eby ID Number Waterloo-27478P 
    Buried Mount Hope Cemetery, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Person ID I27478  Generations
    Last Modified 9 Jan 2023 

    Father Charles Scott,   b. 1784, , Roxburghshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Oct 1845, Blenheim Twp., Oxford Co., Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 61 years) 
    Mother Margaret Douglas,   b. 1790, , Roxburghshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Feb 1879, Blenheim Twp., Oxford Co., Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years) 
    Family ID F25712  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Catherine Smith,   b. 1817, , Aberdeenshire, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Oct 1895, Guelph City, Wellington Co., Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years) 
    Children 
     1. Charles John Scott,   b. 1853, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     2. William Scott,   b. 21 Aug 1856, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Aug 1857, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 1 years)
    Last Modified 9 Jan 2023 
    Family ID F7160  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Mrs.,   b. Abt 1815, of, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Jul 1850, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 35 years) 
    Last Modified 9 Jan 2023 
    Family ID F35776  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Scott, John Dr. - formal painting.jpg
    Scott, John Dr. - formal painting.jpg
    https://www.region.waterloo.on.ca/web/Region.nsf/0/D22EE171F2AA335185256B0A004D7B4C?OpenDocument
    Dr. John Scott
    Dr. John Scott
    source Waterloo Hall of Fame
    Dr. John Scott
    Dr. John Scott
    From Berlin Today 1806-1906 official souvenir located at the Kitchener Public Library
    Dr. John Scott
    Dr. John Scott

  • Notes 
    • It is our painful duty this day to record the Death of a gentleman who, both in his public and private character, had earned for himself the respect and esteem of the community. Dr John Scott, Reeve of the Town of Berlin and Warden of the County of Waterloo died at his residence in Berlin, on Sunday last, aged 42. He had been ill for some months with disease of the liver, but at one time it was hoped that he would be spared to us, as he was able about six weeks ago to leave his house and visit some of his friends. The disease under which he lingered, however, had left him fearfully prostrated and his system never fairly rallied. Consumption set in and death relieved him at last of the suffering under which he had so long labored. See Berlin Chronicle, December 24, 1856 for continuation.(page 2, col. 3)

      Berlin Chronicle 24 Dec 1856

      ______________


      A FEARFUL CALAMITY (cholera fever epidemic of Galt in 1834)

      out of a clear sky, the most terrible calamity which ever befell the locality came swiftly and fatally down upon its ill-fated inhabitants.

      Amusements in the nature of travelling companies were then almost unknown in the new settlements of Upper Canada, and the announcement that a menagerie of wild beasts would exhibit in Galt on the 28th July, caused universal interest far and near. For nearly twenty miles around, the coming exhibition was talked about, until it became the topic of absorbing interest.

      When the day arrived, there was - considering the circumstances - a large attendance, people coming from Waterloo, Beverly, Woolwich, Blenheim, and other places more distant than could have been attracted by anything less exciting than a menagerie was in those early times. The day proved intensely warm, in fact a regular " scorcher," and from all accounts, the collection of wild animals was meagre, and the dens and their occupants extremely filthy. The odor was so marked as to detract seriously from the comfort of the audience, and the entertainment was hardly over, when rumours began to prevail, that the company had brought the much-dreaded disease of cholera with them to the village.

      The report first arose from the illness of one of the showmen. He had been brought to the village a day or two before the menagerie arrived, and fears that his complaint was cholera ....

      His fears, unfortunately, proved too true. That frightful plague, in its worst form, had been introduced by the menagerie, and already the seeds of death were developing in many of those who had attended the fatal entertainment.

      The exhibition took place on Monday, and by Wednesday night and Thursday, the cholera was raging with almost unparalleled malignity and fatality. The harrowing scenes which occurred can never be erased from the memories of those who passed through them. The agony of the stricken, the swiftness of death, the rude board coffins and the hasty burials - in some cases within a few minutes after the last breath was drawn - turned the recently hopeful village into a very charnel-house, from which many fled in despair, whilst all but a few were paralysed with fear. ...

      Mr. Strang's church was stripped of its temporary board seats, and turned into a hospital, where as many as possible of those attacked were taken. Dr. Miller was soon overdone with work, and at his solicitation, one Dr. McQuarrie came to Galt and rendered good service. Most valuable assistance was also given by Dr. John Scott, then a young man of about twenty-one years of age, who, with his father and other members of his family, had fortunately arrived from Roxboroughshire, Scotland, about ten days previously. He was a brother of Mr. Andrew Scott, of Galt, and afterwards became widely known in Berlin as a skilful practitioner and public-spirited citizen.

      Dr. Scott was one of the most fearless of the little band who fought the cholera inch by inch, with their lives in their hands, until it finally disappeared....


      Reminiscenses of the Early History of Galt

      ______________________________


      Dr. John Scott of Berlin for several years past warden of this county, died the 21st inst. Dumfries Reformer

      The Christian Guardian 31 Dec 1856 pg 51

      __________________________________

      Dr. John Scott, Reeve 1854, 1855-6.

      Dr. John Scott was the first warden of Waterloo County and Berlin's first reeve. He was elected in 1854 when it was formed into a village and held the position during 1855 and 1856. His early death ended his public career. But for his efforts it is doubtful whether Berlin would have been chosen as the county seat of Waterloo County. He was s Scotchman by birth and a graduate of the Edinburgh University. His knowledge and ability secured him a practice extensive in all senses of the word. His intense loyalty to Berlin endeared him to his fellow-citizens and they delighted to honor him. His public services deserve further recognition.

      Official souvenir of the celebration of cityhood, July 17th 1912, Berlin, Ontario, The German Printing and Publishing Co

      _________________________________


      Dr. John Scott, a Scottish surgeon, opened an office below Mr. Hailer's turnery in 1835. The doctor's house was on the library Lot. [50 Queen St.N.].

      A History of Kitchener, W. V. (Ben) Uttley, Kitchener, Ontario 1937, pg

      _________________________________

      February 11, 1852 - Inaugural address by John Scott, Reeve of Waterloo


      Allow me to return you thanks for the honourable distinction you have conferred upon me, in electing me Provisional Warden of the important County of Waterloo. In return permit me to congratulate you upon the attainment so far of your long cherished desire of being a new and independent County, and on the proud position you now occupy as its first Municipal Council. The necessity of a separate and independent centre of Municipal and Judicial Jurisdiction has been long felt and acknowledged by the inhabitants of the territory composing the new County of Waterloo, and I think you will agree with me that the Legislation has evinced a high degree of capacity (?) and discrimination in selecting the Township to compose the new County. Let us glance at its topographical features, and we find three of the most important Townships in it, Woolwich, Waterloo and North Dumfries linked together by that noble stream the Grand River, into which after passing through Waterloo flows the Speed at Preston. Higher up, after traversing Wellesley and Woolwich it is joined by the picturesque Conostogo. To the South West of the County we find the river Nith wandering through Wellesley and Wilmot and after traversing the Township of Blenheim (the north half of which, if the almost unanimous wish of the inhabitants were granted must shortly be annexed to this County) likewise joining the Grand River. These main arteries along with a multitude of smaller tributaries are now nearly all employed in propelling machinery of every description and to an amount not to be equalled in any Section of Canada West.

      Within the County you have 20 large Grist Mills, the number of Saw Mills I cannot enumerate, besides Carding and Felting Mills, Foundries, Tanneries, and Factories of almost every description, and all in constant and active operation. The possession of such a vast supply of water power, the general fertility of the soil, the extensive amount of pine timber, a healthy climate, an industrious and enterprising population now numbering according to the late census over 26, 000, excellent roads and good markets render your County one of the most favoured in Upper Canada, and present a field for the investment of capital, in almost every department of industry, not to be surpassed in the Province. Again the completion of the Galt branch of the Great Western Railway, while it will incalculably facilitate the transmifsion of your exports and imports, will closely connect your County with every other part of this vast continent. The central location of your County Town will render the transaction of Municipal and Judicial businefs cheap and convenient, as no party can possibly travel over 20 miles to attend Courts or Councils, thus curtailing and equalising mileage in the service and execution of writs and processes, and rendering easy and convenient the attendance of all parties having business to transact at the County Town. Furthermore, the location of the County Town at Berlin opens up a new field for Railway enterprise as, undoubtedly, at no distant day, it will be connected by Railway either with the Galt branch of the Great Western, or the Toronto and Guelph railroad Again, the proximity, and intimate connection in every point of view existing between this County and the County of Perth, render their interests mutual, and which, if judiciously and fairly developed must tend to the advantage and prosperity of both.

      Your first duty, then, Gentlemen, will be to adopt prompt measures for the erection and completion of your County buildings, so as to procure as early a separation as practicable from the other Counties with which you are now united. As from the geographical position of at least one of these Counties, your interests can never become indentified. The necessity and expediency of this step, will, I feel confident, meet with your unanimous approval. In accomplishing, therefore, this important object, for which the Legislature has proclaimed you a Provisional Council, I sincerely hope you will act with unanimity and promptitude, as by so doing, you will not only be carrying onto the benevolent enactments of the Legislature, but accelerating the settlement and improvement of adjoining townships and promoting the general welfare and prosperity of your new noble County.

      _________________________

      A-1-124 John Scott Letters of Administration of the estate of John Scott, late of Berlin, Esquire, deceased, to Catherine Scott of Berlin, aforesaid widow of the said deceased upon her giving proof that the said deceased died intestate on or about the 21st day of December 1856 and on her giving a bond with security for the due administration of such estate herself and two sureties in the persons of Charles Hendry of Conestogo of the Township of Woolwich, Merchant, and Henry S. Huber, of Berlin aforesaid Merchant, each in the sum of five thousand pounds the person property being to the amount of about two thousand pounds.

      Letters granted 13th February 1857
      Died 21st December 1856
      No Inventory

      Surrogate Court Records Copybook Register A 1853-1871 partial transcript to 1863. Frances Hoffman transcriber.

      ______________________

      SCOTT, JOHN was an outstanding person of intelligence and ability. Skillful and proficient in his profession, and successful in his endeavors in the interests of Berlin, he won the admiration and respect of his fellow citizens.

      In 1834 he came to Canada with his parents, who settled in Blenheim township. This was the year of his graduation in medicine from Edinburgh University, and the year of the cholera. He and a Dr. McQuarrie were called in to assist Dr. Miller of Galt. When the epidemic was over McQuarrie left, probably for Gore District where he died at Nelson ten years later, while Scott opted for Waterloo county.

      He chose Preston initially but soon settled in Berlin. His card which appeared in the Canada Museum on October 29, 1835, has been reproduced. elsewhere.

      After a time, in 1839, he took as an associate Dr. A. D. Hazelius, but this cannot have been a satisfactory arrangement as it lasted less than a year. Hazelius spent some time in the County before moving on.

      He had a considerable reputation as a physician and was regarded as a skillful surgeon. An adherent to the drastic measures of the time, he exhibited interest in new methods, although real advance in medicine did not begin to appear until the 1850s.

      In 18^9 he began to take an active interest in public affairs, an area for which he appeared to be well suited. He foresaw the development of the county, and of Berlin in particular. His efforts were largely responsible for the selection of Berlin as the county seat.

      He was reeve of Waterloo Township, Warden of the County, and reeve of Berlin when it became a village. He appears to have had a grasp of political realities, and in his address following his election as Warden, demonstrated this when he said "Your first duty then, Gentlemen, will be to adopt prompt measures for the erection and completion of your County buildings, so as to procure as early a separation as practicable from the other Counties with which you are now united, as from the geographical' position of at least one of these Counties, your interests can never become identified."

      His activities were not confined to county politics. He campaigned in the election for the candidate who was elected largely through his efforts. lt has been said that he rode out to watch for fugitive rebels after the McKenzie rebellion.

      On December 9, 1856 he addressed a letter through the Berlin Chronicle

      To the Electors of the Municipality of Berlin Gentlemen.

      Having served you three years as Reeve of Berlin, two as Reeve of the Township, and five as Warden of the County of Waterloo,

      I am now resolved to retire from municipal pursuits and duties. Gentlemen, I thank you for the distinguished honours you have hitherto conferred upon me. I am, Gentlemen

      Your obedient servant

      Berlin 9th December 1856 John Scott

      By December 21 he was dead, at 42 years of age, survived by his wife and two children.

      As a prominent figure he has been the subject of numerous articles and sketches. These have appeared in the Waterloo historical Society volumes, and in the local newspapers. His obituary was in the Berlin Chronicle on Dec. 2Ur, 1856, and in the Telegraph on Dec. 26, 1856

      Dr. Alexander D. Campbell, Doctors in Waterloo County 1852-1925

      _____________________

      King Street , North Side

      Frederick Street.

      Bishop Benjamin Eby's farm came to the corner of King and Frederick Streets. Next to Frederick Street, Frederick and William Miller erected a frame building and used it as a general store. After the grading operations spoken of this building had to undergo the same process as the St. Nicholas Hotel. It was considered a fine building in its day with large windows on each side of the centre door. Henry Stroh finally bought the building and tore it down in 1868. Jacob Stroh has some of the window sash, shutters, stairway, etc., still in his possession. Later the building was occupied by Jacob Eckstein cigar maker and tobacco dealer. Mrs. Warren with a family lived on the second story for a number of years.

      Vacant lot. Next a large brick building with double deck porch along the front, the Queen's Arms Hotel, built about 1840 and continued as a hotel until about 1860. A Mr. Butchard was the first landlord and later Levi Weber. From this hotel the first omnibus met the trains at the G.T.R. station in Berlin in 1856. Before that day it was a stopping place of stage coaches operating from Hamilton and Galt to Berlin and beyond. The old Queen's Arms long vacant and practically ruined as a building was sold finally and made room for the Market Building and Town Hall in 1869.*

      Next we come to the John Roos house. This also had a double-deck veranda with heavy posts as was the style 1840-50. The building was later turned into a hotel known as the Market Hotel and kept by Casper Heller.

      A lot with a log cabin in the rear, occupied by Jacob Sauer, who had come from Pennsylvania, father of Mrs. John Roat.

      * See 1922 Annual Report W. H. S., p. 210.

      A harness shop occupied by John Roat, then by his son John and later by John Haugh, a son-in-law of John Roat.

      A garden. A dwelling, 4 or 5 feet lower than the street which had been filled up, where lived the Susand family. Mrs. Susand had a reputation with juveniles for tarts and molasses taffy sold in lc. bars. Her children were in the habit of selling these wares to passengers at the G.T.R. station. After her husband's death about 1860, widow Susand moved her shop to Foundry Street North, and there continued until she died. Susand was an ex-slave. In 1857 at a nomination meeting for Council, he was nominated and stood a good chance of being elected, as a joke. However, the more thoughtful element among the voters prevailed.

      A two story, frame building, lengthwise with King Street, built in the '30's. After street grading this had to be raised so that what had before been the ground floor became the cellar or basement.

      A house occupied by Wm. Hawke,-known as Bill Hawke- a mason. A stout, easy-going man. His wife was in the habit of standing in the door way, with white lace cap, smoking a clay pipe. The east end of this building was occupied by Winters, a hatter, the first hat maker in Berlin. He made the old style, broad brim, Mennonite hats in fashion up to about 1845. At the corner of Scott stood a brick building of good size with gable toward King Street, used to stable the first fire teams for a number of years. Later John Wagner had a waggon shop above and George Ward a blacksmith shop underneath. Scott Street was, however, not opened until many years later.

      A one and one-half story building rough cast, gable facing King St., occupied by H. W. Peterson, who began publishing the "Canada Museum", in 1835 and so continued until 1840 when he went to Guelph as first Registrar of the County of Wellington. This was the first newspaper published in Waterloo County.

      Jacob Hailer's house, a one and one-half story, frame building with porch along the front partly enclosed by lattice work. In this house was born in 1834, Catherine Hailer, who married Louis Breithaupt. She is said to have been the first child born in Berlin of parents who came from Germany. Hailer's barn was some distance back from the street and next along on the street front was his shop where he manufactured spinning wheels, etc., and chairs which had a large distribution. Hailer was an expert wood turner. He had two foot-power lathes and a number of German assistants from time to time, continuing his shop for about 40 years.

      A two story frame building lengthwise with King Street, erected by Dr. John Scott. He had a drug store with two good-sized windows at the front. On the east gable of the building was a sign, "Med. Hall" in large letters. The sign was legible long after Dr. Scott's death. The doctor pursued his practice on horseback for which he used three horses. He was the first medical practitioner in Berlin, coming in 1834, at the time of the cholera epidemic. For a few years before he was married he boarded at the Gaukel Hotel. His later house, after the one described, is still standing on Weber Street at the rear of the Kitchener Public Library.

      The old Scott house on King Street was later occupied by Franz Martin who kept a saloon. Martin had a musical family, with the zither as their principal instrument, which all the children could play.

      A one and one-half story, frame building, painted, occupied by Anslm Wagner, a potter.

      A brick building 1 ½ story lengthwise with King Street, the west end of which was John Eby's drug store, the rest of the building being his dwelling. This was the first regular drug store in Berlin.

      A brick building with a frame extension in the rear used by David Eby as a pump shop. Part of the brick building is still standing, the rest having been cut olT for the opening of Eby Street North.

      A one story hip roof brick cottage occupied by Geo. Eby, a Notary, who came to Canada in 1804. He died in this house. A considerable fish story is told of how he followed a sturgeon in the Conestoga River, part of Grand River, and finally speared it.

      A one and one-half story building, probably rough cast, occupied by Hy. Wurm, a carpenter employed at the Simpson factory.

      A two story brick building painted red occupied by Henry S. Huber.'

      A handsome brick building, two story, with veranda along the front and ground floor considerably above the street level, with broad steps, the width of the building, leading to it, was built in 1850. Some time later it was occupied by Casper Heller and known as the Royal Exchange hotel. Following the old custom its swinging sign had "Last Chance" on the side toward the village and "First Chance" outward, referring to liquid refreshments. Heller kept a good hotel and had also a large shed and ham next east of the hotel.

      On the corner a steam grist mill was erected, about 1860. Louis Seyler, a German, was the miller. The custom was for farmers to bring in their wheat to have it ground, getting in return flour, bran and middlings, the miller retaining his toll. Later Lehnen & Shelly operated this mill.

      REMINISCENCES OF BERLIN (NOW KITCHENER) By JACOB STROH Contributed by Joseph M. Snyder.

      ___________________

      Queen Street North, West Side

      Gaukel's well at the corner of the hotel shed, the corner being later built up as the Bowman Block, now the Bank of Montreal.

      A brick warehouse belonging to the corner store of the Bowman Block. First occupants of this store were Bowman and Heins, later H. S, Huber and then by Huber and Roy.

      Opposite the Breithaupt leather store stood a one-story brick building, Dr. Pipe's surgery and later Dr. Wright's.

      A two-storey brick house lengthwise with Queen Street and with veranda on two sides, the veranda a few steps above the ground, occupied by Henry Schaefer. In 1871 Dr. Pipe lived in this house. Among other things Dr. Pipe kept bees, although he was quite afraid of them. Dr. Pipe and Henry Stroh succeeded in bringing the first Italian queen bee to this part of the country.

      A lane.

      A handsome brick house, gable roof, lengthwise with the street, the corners faced with limestone from Guelph, erected by Joseph Hobson, the surveyer, in 1860. Hobson eventually was Chief Engineer of the Great Western Railway and when that was merged with the Grand Trunk he became Chief Engineer of the latter Company and was among other things Chief Engineer of the Sarnia tunnel. Alexander MacPherson, editor and publisher of the Berlin Telegraph, later lived in the house. The site is now occupied by the head office of the Economical Fire Insurance Company.

      A two-story red frame building well back from the street built probably before 1850 by Peter Eby, identified with the "Deutsche Canadier" and with the early days of the "Telegraph". Dr. Eggert, homeopath, lived in the house 1859-1860 and later John Klippert, high constable and county bailiff.

      One and a half story brick building at the corner of Duke and Queen Streets occupied by a Mr. Von Ebenau and wife and later for a number of years by Michael Jaehle, a blacksmith. The site is now occupied by the Daily Record building.

      Duke Street.

      A large handsome building trimmed with cut stone built in 1860 by David S. Shoemaker of Bridgeport who was county registrar, The building was intended for a bank and agent's residence and so used first by the Commercial Bank which failed and later by the Merchants Bank of which R. N, Rogers was agent for a number of years. Some time later Dr. H. S. Lackner acquired the property and used it as residence and surgery. After Dr. Lackner's death the property was sold to the present occupants, the Langleys of Toronto.

      building, colonial style, with large posts at the front carrying the projecting roof, erected in 1848-49, the Waterloo Township Hall, the land for which was donated by Frederick Gaukel. General public meetings were held in this hall, among others meetings purposing to have Berlin named as county town. After consummation of this a banquet was held in the hall, which was occasionally used for such purpose. The occasion of this particular banquet was the laying of the corner stone of the new county buildings in 1852. 100 guests were present and there were a number of patriotic toasts. Later the building was used as a printing office, the "Deutsche Canadier" and the "Telegraph" being printed there for a time. Eventually the building was remodelled and enlarged and became the Methodist Church. In 1904 the St. Matthews Lutheran congregation purchased the property and later the First English Lutheran Church, which still continues in the building.

      Behind the present Kitchener Public Library, occupying the site of his ornamental garden, and still standing is Dr. Scott's residence, built in 1855. Henry Rothaermel was the contractor. Dr. Scott was the first warden of the county and first reeve of Berlin. After his death the house was occupied by M. C. Schofield who married Dr. Scott's widow. Later Israel Bowman, for many years county clerk and town clerk of Berlin, acquired the property and lived there.

      Weber Street.

      On the corner the Presbyterian Church first built 1860-61 at a size of 36 ft. by 50 ft., cost $4,500 and seating 175 persons. Rev. John McMeekin was an early minister.

      A two-story red brick building lengthwise with Queen Street, built 1855-56, the house of H. S. Huber.

      Simon Roy's house, also red brick, one and one-half story high, both of these houses were set back from the street. Mr. Roy was nurseryman and florist.

      A one-story double house lengthwise with Queen Street.

      Before Ahrens Street was continued westerly across Queen Street there was on the site a two-story unpainted weather-boarded building, the house of John Dopp.
      frame building, similar to Dopp's, the house of Christina Bloch, a widow who lived there for many years.

      A frame building, similar to Dopp's, but with gable facing Queen Street, the house of August Vetter, painter and paper-hanger.

      A vacant lot later owned by Louis Breithaupt who built, on the corner of Margaret Avenue, a residence for Judge Lacourse.

      Margaret Avenue.

      On Margaret Avenue a short distance westerly from Queen Street was the Moxley farm with house and barn. The barn was later moved to Lexington by Henry Stroh who bought it to replace one that had been struck by lightning. On the corner of Ellen Street a brick house occupied in the early days by Rev. Mr. Savage, Methodist minister, and later by John Hoffman, Jr., a druggist.

      Ellen Street.

      REMINISCENCES OF BERLIN (NOW KITCHENER) By JACOB STROH Contributed by Joseph M. Snyder.

      Part I. Settlement - Early Villagers and Buildings, Waterloo Historical Society Annual Volume 1930



  • Sources 
    1. [S1338] News - ON, Waterloo, Cambridge - Galt Reporter (1846-1973), Obituary of Margaret Douglass - Scott - 14 Feb 1879, Page 3.

    2. [S166] Cemetery - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Mount Hope CC#4508 Internet Link .
      N.E. John Scott M.D./ a native of/ Roxburghshire/ Scotland/ and 22 years a resident/ of Berlin C.W./ died Dec. 21, 1856/ ae. 42 years S.E. William/ 2nd son of/ J. & C. Scott/ died Aug. 22, 1857/ ae. 1 year

    3. [S131] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo Twp. - 1851, Div 4 Pg 12.

    4. [S27] International Genealogical Index - Extracted Church Records, Parish registers for Lillesleaf, 1737-1854 Church of Scotland. Parish Church of Lilliesleaf (Roxburghshire) Filim 1067947.

    5. [S2070] Directory - Ontario Directory for 1851.

    6. [S14] News - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Berlin Chronicle (1856-1860), December 24, 1856.

    7. [S1000] News - Christian Guardian - Death Notices from the Christian Guardian 1851-1860, 31 Dec 1856 pg 51 - Death Notice of Dr. John Scott.

    8. [S14] News - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Berlin Chronicle (1856-1860), 18 Jan 1859.
      13 Jan 1859 In Berlin, on the 13th inst., by the Rev'd A. C. Geikie, M.C. Schofield, Esq., P.L.S., to Catherine Scott, widow of the late Dr. Scott, of Berlin. [We have to acknowledge the receipt of the usual bridal favors, and wish our estimable friends every happiness in the life they have so auspiciously entered upon.]

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 25 Jan 1814 - Lilliesleaf, , Roxburgh, Scotland Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsImmigration - 1834 - Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1834 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - medical doctor and coroner - 1851 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsElected Office - Warden - 1852 - , Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsElected Office - Reeve - 1856 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Cause: consumption - 21 Dec 1856 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Doctor - Bef 1859 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Mount Hope Cemetery, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth