Waterloo Region Generations
A record of the people of Waterloo Region, Ontario.
Friedrich "Frederick" Gaukel

Friedrich "Frederick" Gaukel[1]

Male 1784 - 1853  (69 years)

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  • Name Friedrich "Frederick" Gaukel 
    Born 9 Jun 1784  , Wuerttemberg, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3, 4, 5
    Gender Male 
    Birth CALC 7 Jun 1785  [5
    Land Bef 1831  Waterloo Township - German Company Tract Lot 005S, Waterloo County, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Occupation 1836  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    innkeeper 
    Occupation 1840  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    Occupation 1851  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    innkeeper 
    Occupation 1852  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [10
    innkeeper 
    Probate 1853  Wilmot Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [11
    Died 8 Nov 1853  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 4, 5, 12
    Cause: dropsy 
    Hall of Fame - Waterloo Region Bef 2012  , Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [13
    Interesting business, hotel, story, pioneer 
    Name Frederick Gaukel 
    Residence Lutheran 
    Eby ID Number Waterloo-34480 
    Buried First Mennonite Cemetery, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 4
    Person ID I34480  Generations
    Last Modified 27 Jan 2022 

    Family 1 Polly Kaufman,   b. Abt 1790, Of, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1827, , Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 37 years) 
    Children 
     1. Nancy Gaukel,   b. Abt 1810, , Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     2. Heinrich Gaukel,   b. 30 Nov 1813, , Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Aug 1834  (Age 20 years)
     3. Emanuel Gaukel,   b. 21 Feb 1815, , Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Oct 1895  (Age 80 years)
     4. Elisabeth Gaukel,   b. 17 Jan 1818, , Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Oct 1879  (Age 61 years)
     5. George Gaukel,   b. 6 Sep 1819, , Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Jan 1855, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 35 years)
     6. Levi Gaukel,   b. Between 22 Sep 1823 and 1824, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1871  (Age ~ 47 years)
     7. Susannah Gaukel,   b. 18 Sep 1824, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 May 1873, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 48 years)
    Last Modified 27 Jan 2022 
    Family ID F11663  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Maria Roschang,   b. 11 Nov 1800, Of, Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Aug 1834, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 33 years) 
    Children 
     1. Jacob Gaukel,   b. 29 Oct 1832, , Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
    Last Modified 27 Jan 2022 
    Family ID F11747  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 Dorothea Weismiller,   b. CALC 23 Apr 1787, , Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Jun 1872, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 85 years) 
    Last Modified 27 Jan 2022 
    Family ID F20633  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Friedrich Gaukel
    Friedrich Gaukel
    Friedrich Gaukel
    Friedrich Gaukel

  • Notes 
    • GAUKEL, FRIEDRICH (Frederick), farmer and businessman; b. 7 June 1785 in Württemberg (Federal Republic of Germany); m. first c. 1813 Polly Kaufman (d. 1827), and they had four sons and three daughters; m. secondly Maria Roschang (d. 1834 of cholera); m. thirdly Dorothea Weikmillar; d. 8 Nov. 1853 in Berlin (Kitchener), Upper Canada.

      Friedrich Gaukel's name appears among those of the German immigrants who arrived at Philadelphia from Holland aboard the Rebecca on 27 Aug. 1804. Along with other Württemberg natives, he may have been attracted to America by the publicity attending the exodus to Pennsylvania at this time of members of the charismatic sect led by the German lay preacher and weaver John George Rapp. According to a short biography published by Gaukel's grandson Jacob Stroh, he served for his passage money as a redemptioner on a farm near Philadelphia. He continued farming after his release from the indenture and by 1815 lived near Johnstown, Pa.

      About 1820 Gaukel, a Lutheran, heard of the Mennonite migration from Pennsylvania to Upper Canada and decided to move there. After a trip of four weeks he arrived with his family in Waterloo Township, where he worked in a distillery until he bought a small farm near Bridgeport (Kitchener) and began operating a distillery of his own. After 1826 increasing numbers of Germans arrived in the region directly from Europe and settled largely in four townships: Wilmot, Waterloo, Woolwich, and Wellesley. Thus when the settlement of Ebytown began to expand, Germans, as well as Mennonites, were prominent in its development as a commercial centre. On 2 Nov. 1833 Gaukel purchased property there from Joseph Schneider* and from Benjamin Eby and moved into the settlement. The deeds for these transactions are the first on record referring to the community as Berlin.

      Gaukel operated a tavern while awaiting the completion of a larger building which would meet the demands of the growing village. A public-spirited member of the community, he subscribed to the establishment of Heinrich Wilhelm Peterson's newspaper Canada Museum, und Allgemeine Zeitung in 1835, the year in which Gaukel's Inn (later known as the Commercial Hotel) opened to the public. For many years Gaukel and his third wife, also a native of Württemberg, hosted, in addition to the inn's daily commercial activities, various civic and political meetings, markets, and other public gatherings in this predominantly German-speaking community. The wide veranda of the inn was a favourite tribune for political candidates who addressed the citizenry assembled in the street.

      In 1841 and 1846 Gaukel acquired additional property and as one of Berlin's leading landowners he took an active interest in its municipal development. He donated the land on which Waterloo Township Hall was built in 1848-49. Together with his friend Joseph Schneider and other early citizens, he had campaigned for the organization of Waterloo County, which took place in 1850, and he was much involved in promoting Berlin's selection as county seat in 1852. He provided land that year for the construction of a county court-house. In recognition of Gaukel's contributions, a grateful community named two of its early streets after him.

      Klaus Wust

      AO, RG 22, ser.214, Friedrich Gaukel. Kitchener Public Library (Kitchener, Ont.), "Gaukel family notes" (typescript). PAC, RG 31, A1, 1851, Waterloo Township, pt.4: 178. Waterloo North Land Registry Office (Kitchener), Abstract index to deeds, Berlin (mfm. at AO, GS 2958); Waterloo Township (mfm. at AO, GS 3023, GS 3027). Der Deutsche Canadier (Berlin [Kitchener]), 10 Nov. 1853. R. B. Strassburger, Pennsylvania German pioneers: a publication of the original lists of arrivals in the port of Philadelphia from 1727 to 1808, ed. W. J. Hinke (3v., Norristown, Pa., 1934), 3: 147. Gottlieb Leibbrandt, Little paradise: the saga of the German Canadians of Waterloo County, Ontario, 1800'96 1975 (Kitchener, 1980), 36, 38'96 51. Bill Moyer, Kitchener: yesterday revisited; an illustrated history (Burlington, Ont., 1979), 19'96 21, 27. W. V. Uttley, A history of Kitchener, Ontario (Kitchener, 1937; repr. [Waterloo, Ont., 1975]), 35, 37'96 38, 40'96 41, 71, 80, 83, 85, 88. Jacob Stroh, "Frederick Gaukel," Waterloo Hist. Soc., Annual report, 1928: 86'96 87; "Reminiscences of Berlin (now Kitchener)," Waterloo Hist. Soc., Annual report, 1930: 175'96 207; 1931: 274'96 84.


      Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online 2000 University of Toronto/Université Laval

      __________________

      In 1800 Frederick Gaukel of Wurtemberg, Germany, arrived at Amsterdam too late to join a whaling expedition to the Arctic. Finding a sailing vessel going to Philadelphia, he allowed himself to be sold under the hammer to the highest bidder for a service period of three years, to pay for the voyage across the ocean. Eventually he was sold to a farmer.

      Gaukel immigrated to Canada, arriving at Preston where he worked in a distillery. Later he moved to a small farm near Bridgeport and erected a log cabin and barn and a small distillery. In 1819 he moved to Berlin and in 1833 started Gaukel's Tavern, later the site of the Walper House.

      Gaukel was a civic-minded citizen and donated the property bounded by Queen, Weber and Frederick Streets on which the 1852 County Building was erected. This building was demolished when the present County Building was erected in 1965. Two of Kitchener's streets, Frederick and Gaukel, bear his name.

      Waterloo Region Hall of Fame

      ____________________

      A-1-20 Frederick Gaukel: Last Will and Testament of Frederick Gaukel, of Berlin, Translated from the Original written in German.

      …I, Frederick Gaukel, Tavern Keeper in Berlin, being, thanks be to God, in full possession of my powers of mind, do hereby appoint my last Will and Testament, in manner following. …My beloved wife Dorothee, a born Weismiller, shall of the loose goods and chattels left by me receive one cow according to her choice, two made up beds with bedsteads, one bureau, one house clock and necessary kitchen utensils. My Executors, shall directly after my demise, build for my beloved wife Dorothee, on the North side at the righthand of King Street, at Abraham Weber's Fence, a one story frame house with room, chamber, kitchen and cellar, twenty by twenty four feet wide, with a proper stable thereto, with one half an acre of land thereto, whereof she is to have quiet and peaceable possession as long as she lives. After her heath it shall be sold and the half part of the proceeds shall fall to the Relations and friends of my said widow, and the other half shall be divided amongst all my children in equal proportions. All my remaining momoveable and immovable, real and loose property, goods and chattels, shall by my hereinafter named Executors, after previous three times repeated public advertisement, be sold by Public Auction to the highest bidder…My son George shall receive two hundred dollars more, which are to be taken out of the portion of my daughter Elizabeth, a married Ahrens. For Executors of this my last Will and Testament I chose nominate and appoint hereby, my son Levi, butcher in Berlin, Waterloo Township, and my son-in-law Henry Stroh of Berlin, Waterloo Township, Shoemaker…

      Witnesses George Seip and Paul Schmitt
      Will date 10 January 1849
      Proved and Insinuated 15 November 1853
      No inventory amount
      Died 8 November 1853
      Translated by Christian. Enslin, N.P.

      Wills of Waterloo County Register A 1853-1871, transcribed by Frances Hoffman

      ____________________________

      Shortly after the arrival of Mr. Hailer, Frederick Gaukel bought the Varnum tavern site. He was native in Wuertemberg, and first had owned a distillery and farm at Bridgeport. On November 2, 1833, he bought lots that lay from near the Walper House corner up to Ontario Street from Joseph Schneider. Mr. Gaukel bought also a block of land on the north side of King Street, between Queen and Ontario Streets, from Bishop Eby, and a small triangle on the corner of King and. Ontario Streets, to complete the Block, from Joseph Schneider.

      Bishop Eby, accompanied by Joseph Schneider, named the Dorf, Berlin. The date is uncertain, but Mr. Hailer's deed of May. 1833, describes Six acre as being in Waterloo Township; whilst Mr. Gaukel's deed of November 2, 1833, says his purchase lay in Berlin The assumption is that the place was named Berlin in the summer of 1833.

      Mr. Gaukel built a large frame hotel near the Walser House corner in 1835. It had stables in the rear and a driving-shed on the Bank of Montreal corner. At Gaukel's, a meal was Sold far fifteen cents and a glass of beer for three cents. There the householders of Berlin and the Township paid their taxes, and there they nominated candidates for the Wellington District Council.
      Afterward Mr. Gaukel bought additional lands in West King Street, up to Gaukel Street, which was named for him. He bought also a strip in Schneider's Road, bordering the Walper corner, from Joseph E. Schneider; and lands in East Weber Street, including the courthouse site.

      A History of Kitchener, W. V. (Ben) Uttley, Kitchener, Ontario 1937, pg 35-6

      ____________________

      King Street Kitchener

      "Gaukel to Foundry Street
      (now Ontario Street).-After a vacant lot on the corner there was a one and one-half storey frame building with gable facing King Street, occupied by the late Frederick Gaukel in 1852 and 53, when he died there. The building was later moved to the corner and used by Mr. Woelfle as a plough shop. After Mr. Gaukel's death his executors built a one and one-half storey brick house for his widow next to the house just mentioned. This brick house was taken down by Messrs. Brown & Erb who built their glove factory on the site."

      REMINISCENCES OF BERLIN (NOW KITCHENER) BY JACOB STROH Contributed by Joseph M. Snyder.

      Part I. Settlement - Early Villagers and Buildings, Waterloo Historical Society Annual Volume 1930

      _________________________

      King Street, Kitchener

      Next, well back and at the bottom of a slope from King Street, was the back of Gaukel's Hotel, extending back to Hall's Lane.

      Gaukel's was the first considerable Hotel in Berlin. Frederick Gaukel, who had come from Pennsylvania in 1820, purchased a tract of lots in 1833 from Joseph Schneider on the westerly corner of Queen and King Streets, the site formerly occupied by Phineas Vemum's blacksmith shop, and thereon erected a two story frame building with a wide Colonial style veranda. Candidates at election spoke from this veranda to the crowd on the street, and it had other like uses. The little house standing in the rear, which Phineas Varnum had used for a tavern, was used as a kitchen. The hotel woodshed came next. It was a frame building.

      When judges came to Berlin for County Court they stayed at this hotel and Henry Stroh would be asked to forage for speckled trout and partridge, Mr. Gaukel wishing to place something special before his distinguished guests. In 1851 Gaukel had a bear tied by a chain to a post in the barnyard on King Street. There was a cross board on top of the post to which the bear could climb and become a public exhibition. In the early years Indians, wrapped in their government blankets, were in the habit of calling at the house for something to eat. The woods along the Conestoga River abounded in butternuts and these, gathered in the fall, served to entertain the guests on Sunday afternoons. Henry Bachman was an early bartender at the hotel.

      Frederick Gaukel died in 1853. His son George thereafter had the hotel for one year, paying $140.00 rent to the Estate. James Potter, who came from Bridgeport, then bought the place and changed its name to The Great Western Hotel. He took down the heavy colonial veranda and replaced it with a new one of iron posts and iron railings. The veranda continued to be a rostrum for political orators. Hon. Michael Hamilton Foley, Post Master General, and Mr. I. E. Bowman, for many years Member of Parliament for North Waterloo, spoke from it. Potter had a large swinging sign on a post at the corner facing King Street. On a windy day 'the squeak of the swinging sign could be heard throughout the village. On the sign were the proprietor's name, the name of the hotel and a picture of The Great Eastern Steamship, by far the largest ship of its time.

      REMINISCENCES OF BERLIN (NOW KITCHENER) By JACOB STROH Contributed by Joseph M. Snyder.

      Part I. Settlement - Early Villagers and Buildings, Waterloo Historical Society Annual Volume 1930

      ___________________

      Queen Street North, West Side

      Gaukel's well at the corner of the hotel shed, the corner being later built up as the Bowman Block, now the Bank of Montreal.

      A brick warehouse belonging to the corner store of the Bowman Block. First occupants of this store were Bowman and Heins, later H. S, Huber and then by Huber and Roy.

      Opposite the Breithaupt leather store stood a one-story brick building, Dr. Pipe's surgery and later Dr. Wright's.

      A two-storey brick house lengthwise with Queen Street and with veranda on two sides, the veranda a few steps above the ground, occupied by Henry Schaefer. In 1871 Dr. Pipe lived in this house. Among other things Dr. Pipe kept bees, although he was quite afraid of them. Dr. Pipe and Henry Stroh succeeded in bringing the first Italian queen bee to this part of the country.

      A lane.

      A handsome brick house, gable roof, lengthwise with the street, the corners faced with limestone from Guelph, erected by Joseph Hobson, the surveyer, in 1860. Hobson eventually was Chief Engineer of the Great Western Railway and when that was merged with the Grand Trunk he became Chief Engineer of the latter Company and was among other things Chief Engineer of the Sarnia tunnel. Alexander MacPherson, editor and publisher of the Berlin Telegraph, later lived in the house. The site is now occupied by the head office of the Economical Fire Insurance Company.

      A two-story red frame building well back from the street built probably before 1850 by Peter Eby, identified with the "Deutsche Canadier" and with the early days of the "Telegraph". Dr. Eggert, homeopath, lived in the house 1859-1860 and later John Klippert, high constable and county bailiff.

      One and a half story brick building at the corner of Duke and Queen Streets occupied by a Mr. Von Ebenau and wife and later for a number of years by Michael Jaehle, a blacksmith. The site is now occupied by the Daily Record building.

      Duke Street.

      A large handsome building trimmed with cut stone built in 1860 by David S. Shoemaker of Bridgeport who was county registrar, The building was intended for a bank and agent's residence and so used first by the Commercial Bank which failed and later by the Merchants Bank of which R. N, Rogers was agent for a number of years. Some time later Dr. H. S. Lackner acquired the property and used it as residence and surgery. After Dr. Lackner's death the property was sold to the present occupants, the Langleys of Toronto.

      building, colonial style, with large posts at the front carrying the projecting roof, erected in 1848-49, the Waterloo Township Hall, the land for which was donated by Frederick Gaukel. General public meetings were held in this hall, among others meetings purposing to have Berlin named as county town. After consummation of this a banquet was held in the hall, which was occasionally used for such purpose. The occasion of this particular banquet was the laying of the corner stone of the new county buildings in 1852. 100 guests were present and there were a number of patriotic toasts. Later the building was used as a printing office, the "Deutsche Canadier" and the "Telegraph" being printed there for a time. Eventually the building was remodelled and enlarged and became the Methodist Church. In 1904 the St. Matthews Lutheran congregation purchased the property and later the First English Lutheran Church, which still continues in the building.

      Behind the present Kitchener Public Library, occupying the site of his ornamental garden, and still standing is Dr. Scott's residence, built in 1855. Henry Rothaermel was the contractor. Dr. Scott was the first warden of the county and first reeve of Berlin. After his death the house was occupied by M. C. Schofield who married Dr. Scott's widow. Later Israel Bowman, for many years county clerk and town clerk of Berlin, acquired the property and lived there.

      Weber Street.

      On the corner the Presbyterian Church first built 1860-61 at a size of 36 ft. by 50 ft., cost $4,500 and seating 175 persons. Rev. John McMeekin was an early minister.

      A two-story red brick building lengthwise with Queen Street, built 1855-56, the house of H. S. Huber.

      Simon Roy's house, also red brick, one and one-half story high, both of these houses were set back from the street. Mr. Roy was nurseryman and florist.

      A one-story double house lengthwise with Queen Street.

      Before Ahrens Street was continued westerly across Queen Street there was on the site a two-story unpainted weather-boarded building, the house of John Dopp.
      frame building, similar to Dopp's, the house of Christina Bloch, a widow who lived there for many years.

      A frame building, similar to Dopp's, but with gable facing Queen Street, the house of August Vetter, painter and paper-hanger.

      A vacant lot later owned by Louis Breithaupt who built, on the corner of Margaret Avenue, a residence for Judge Lacourse.

      Margaret Avenue.

      On Margaret Avenue a short distance westerly from Queen Street was the Moxley farm with house and barn. The barn was later moved to Lexington by Henry Stroh who bought it to replace one that had been struck by lightning. On the corner of Ellen Street a brick house occupied in the early days by Rev. Mr. Savage, Methodist minister, and later by John Hoffman, Jr., a druggist.

      Ellen Street.

      REMINISCENCES OF BERLIN (NOW KITCHENER) By JACOB STROH Contributed by Joseph M. Snyder.

      Part I. Settlement - Early Villagers and Buildings, Waterloo Historical Society Annual Volume 1930

      _________________

      Queen Street North, West Side

      Gaukel's well at the corner of the hotel shed, the corner being later built up as the Bowman Block, now the Bank of Montreal.

      A brick warehouse belonging to the corner store of the Bowman Block. First occupants of this store were Bowman and Heins, later H. S, Huber and then by Huber and Roy.

      Opposite the Breithaupt leather store stood a one-story brick building, Dr. Pipe's surgery and later Dr. Wright's.

      A two-storey brick house lengthwise with Queen Street and with veranda on two sides, the veranda a few steps above the ground, occupied by Henry Schaefer. In 1871 Dr. Pipe lived in this house. Among other things Dr. Pipe kept bees, although he was quite afraid of them. Dr. Pipe and Henry Stroh succeeded in bringing the first Italian queen bee to this part of the country.

      A lane.

      A handsome brick house, gable roof, lengthwise with the street, the corners faced with limestone from Guelph, erected by Joseph Hobson, the surveyer, in 1860. Hobson eventually was Chief Engineer of the Great Western Railway and when that was merged with the Grand Trunk he became Chief Engineer of the latter Company and was among other things Chief Engineer of the Sarnia tunnel. Alexander MacPherson, editor and publisher of the Berlin Telegraph, later lived in the house. The site is now occupied by the head office of the Economical Fire Insurance Company.

      A two-story red frame building well back from the street built probably before 1850 by Peter Eby, identified with the "Deutsche Canadier" and with the early days of the "Telegraph". Dr. Eggert, homeopath, lived in the house 1859-1860 and later John Klippert, high constable and county bailiff.

      One and a half story brick building at the corner of Duke and Queen Streets occupied by a Mr. Von Ebenau and wife and later for a number of years by Michael Jaehle, a blacksmith. The site is now occupied by the Daily Record building.

      Duke Street.

      A large handsome building trimmed with cut stone built in 1860 by David S. Shoemaker of Bridgeport who was county registrar, The building was intended for a bank and agent's residence and so used first by the Commercial Bank which failed and later by the Merchants Bank of which R. N, Rogers was agent for a number of years. Some time later Dr. H. S. Lackner acquired the property and used it as residence and surgery. After Dr. Lackner's death the property was sold to the present occupants, the Langleys of Toronto.

      building, colonial style, with large posts at the front carrying the projecting roof, erected in 1848-49, the Waterloo Township Hall, the land for which was donated by Frederick Gaukel. General public meetings were held in this hall, among others meetings purposing to have Berlin named as county town. After consummation of this a banquet was held in the hall, which was occasionally used for such purpose. The occasion of this particular banquet was the laying of the corner stone of the new county buildings in 1852. 100 guests were present and there were a number of patriotic toasts. Later the building was used as a printing office, the "Deutsche Canadier" and the "Telegraph" being printed there for a time. Eventually the building was remodelled and enlarged and became the Methodist Church. In 1904 the St. Matthews Lutheran congregation purchased the property and later the First English Lutheran Church, which still continues in the building.

      Behind the present Kitchener Public Library, occupying the site of his ornamental garden, and still standing is Dr. Scott's residence, built in 1855. Henry Rothaermel was the contractor. Dr. Scott was the first warden of the county and first reeve of Berlin. After his death the house was occupied by M. C. Schofield who married Dr. Scott's widow. Later Israel Bowman, for many years county clerk and town clerk of Berlin, acquired the property and lived there.

      Weber Street.

      On the corner the Presbyterian Church first built 1860-61 at a size of 36 ft. by 50 ft., cost $4,500 and seating 175 persons. Rev. John McMeekin was an early minister.

      A two-story red brick building lengthwise with Queen Street, built 1855-56, the house of H. S. Huber.

      Simon Roy's house, also red brick, one and one-half story high, both of these houses were set back from the street. Mr. Roy was nurseryman and florist.

      A one-story double house lengthwise with Queen Street.

      Before Ahrens Street was continued westerly across Queen Street there was on the site a two-story unpainted weather-boarded building, the house of John Dopp.
      frame building, similar to Dopp's, the house of Christina Bloch, a widow who lived there for many years.

      A frame building, similar to Dopp's, but with gable facing Queen Street, the house of August Vetter, painter and paper-hanger.

      A vacant lot later owned by Louis Breithaupt who built, on the corner of Margaret Avenue, a residence for Judge Lacourse.

      Margaret Avenue.

      On Margaret Avenue a short distance westerly from Queen Street was the Moxley farm with house and barn. The barn was later moved to Lexington by Henry Stroh who bought it to replace one that had been struck by lightning. On the corner of Ellen Street a brick house occupied in the early days by Rev. Mr. Savage, Methodist minister, and later by John Hoffman, Jr., a druggist.

      Ellen Street.

      REMINISCENCES OF BERLIN (NOW KITCHENER) By JACOB STROH Contributed by Joseph M. Snyder.

      Part I. Settlement - Early Villagers and Buildings, Waterloo Historical Society Annual Volume 1930

      ____________________________

      Queen Street South, West Side.

      A frame building used as a tavern by Phineas Varnum and later the kitchen of the Gaukel Hotel.

      A frame building erected by Frederick Gaukel about 1833 as shelter for the considerable number of immigrants coming to Berlin at that time. In 1837 it was made into a dwelling for John Stroh, uncle of Jacob Stroh. Two children were born in this building, Katie, in 1838, (she married Jacob Oswald, still living, now 93 years of age), and Henry Stroh, born in 1840.

      Hall's Lane.

      A brick building erected about 1850. John Klein, father of John Klein of Buffalo, was the first occupant. Later the building was used as a printing office, first by the "Berlin Chronicle", William Jaffray editor and proprietor, and later by the "Berliner Journal", Rittinger & Motz. The site is now occupied by the Lockhart garage.

      The Franklin Hotel, a handsome, good-sized frame building, erected by Philip Roth about 1856. Successive hotel-keepers were John Klein, Levi Gaukel, Frederick Riegelman, who later moved to Buffalo, and Jacob Weber. Weber was occupant in 1874 when the hotel was burned down. The fire started in the barn at the rear of the hotel. The hotel shed, next south, extended, at right angles, from Queen Street to the barn.

      A garden.

      A one and one-half story frame building lengthwise with the street occupied by Christopher K. Nahrgang whose parents came from Hessen, Germany, about 1835. He was married to a Miss Zinkann of New Hamburg.

      A stone building used as a tailor shop by Mr. Nahrgang who was deaf and dumb. His wife helped him in the business. She lived to be 87. It was in this building that John Motz of the "Journal" and eventually County Sheriff, learned the tailoring trade.

      A one and one-half story dwelling, erected about 1857, occupied by George Fischer, barber, who had his shop on King Street. A later occupant was George Lutz, a cabinet maker in Hoffman's factory and after him Henry Schaefer's mother.

      A frame building lengthwise with the street, the church of the Evangelical denomination, erected in 1841. In 1866 it was replaced by the brick building still standing, now used as stores and upstairs dwellings.

      A one and one-half story frame building with kitchen at the rear erected by William Becking, wagonmaker, about 1848. Becking was noted as a hunter. White hare and passenger pigeons, practically extinct long ago, were abundant at that time.

      Becking's wagon-shop and lumber yard at the corner of John Street with the customary incline and stair to the second story of the shop. Up this incline the wagons were drawn to the paint shop. Valentine Gildner, at the corner of King and Benton Streets, did the blacksmith work for Becking's wagons.

      John Street.

      A one and one-half story house occupied by H. Baedecker in 1860 and later by Adam Doering.

      Rev. F. W. Tuerk's residence erected about 1860 by Henry Rothaermel, a carpenter. The matching and planing was all done by hand, slow but thorough work. Window sashes, panel doors and all other requirements were made in the same manner. A skilled workman at that time was expected to he able to do painting as well as carpenter work. A single room in the shape of a square turret on the ridge of the building was Rev. Tuerk's study. The house was up-hill about twenty feet above the street level so that the study on top gave a good outlook. The site is now occupied by the York Apartments.

      A frame building one and one-half story high.

      Nothing but a building used as an ashery between that and Joseph E. Schneider's house and farm buildings.


      REMINISCENCES OF BERLIN (NOW KITCHENER) By JACOB STROH Contributed by Joseph M. Snyder.

      Part I. Settlement - Early Villagers and Buildings, Waterloo Historical Society Annual Volume 1930

  • Sources 
    1. [S6] Church Records - ON, Waterloo - Bindeman, F. W. - Card Index Kitchener Public Library, pg 4.
      Elisabeth Gaukel daughter of Friedrich and Maria (nee) Kaufmann, sponsors Peter Knechtel and Henry Roch

    2. [S6] Church Records - ON, Waterloo - Bindeman, F. W. - Card Index Kitchener Public Library, #48 pg 163.
      Friederich Gaukel in Berlin, died 8 Nov 1853, aged 69 y, 4m, 29d, buried Ben Eby's

    3. [S131] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo Twp. - 1851, Div 4 Pg 1.
      Friderik GAUKEL Inn Keeper Germany 67 Lutheran b. 9-Jun
      Thoroda GAUKEL Germany 63 Lutheran b. 23-Apr
      George GAUKEL Inn Keeper USA 32 Lutheran b. 6-Sep
      Jacob GAUKEL Labourer Canada 20 Lutheran b. 29-Oct
      Friderik WENDOLIN Labourer Germany 37 Roman Catholic b. 2-Feb
      Isabella TYSON Canada 14 Lutheran b. 24-Jul
      Jacob GEIGER Mason Germany 26 Lutheran b. 9-Mar
      Victor HOOFSTETER Labourer Germany 38 Roman Catholic b. 12-Mar

    4. [S47] Cemetery - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - First Mennonite CC#4507 Internet link First Mennonite Cemetery online.
      Friedrich Gaukel / einer der ersten ansiedler der / Stadt / starb. den 8 November 1853 / im alter von 68 Jahre 5 M. / und 1 Tag

    5. [S244] News - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Deutsche Canadier (1841-1865) - Index to Births, Deaths and Marriages Announced in the Deutsche Canadier, Berlin, Canada West. originally indexed by Simone Nieuwolt and Sylvie Kuppek..organised by Rosemary Ambrose, 10 Nov 1853 Page 45.
      Friederich Gaukel Died 8 Nov 1853 At 6 a.m. of dropsy. 68y, 5m, 1d One of the first settlers of the city.

    6. [S1322] Land - Founding Families of Waterloo Township 1800-1830, 26.

    7. [S6] Church Records - ON, Waterloo - Bindeman, F. W. - Card Index Kitchener Public Library.
      Henry Killer, labourer of Waterloo Twp. married 13 Nov 1836 in Berlin by banns to Cathrine Mellan of Waterloo Twp. wit: John Nahrgang taylor of Waterloo Twp. & Fredrect Gaukel, tavern keeper of Waterloo Twp.

    8. [S9] News - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Canada Museum und Allgemeine Zeitung (1835-1840), 4 Sep 1840:17.
      last Tuesday Rev Bindemann m. Joh. Heinrich Stroh to Spr Susanna Gaukel, daughter of Friederich Gaukel, innkeeper, all from the city of Berlin.

    9. [S2070] Directory - Ontario Directory for 1851.

    10. [S131] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo Twp. - 1851, Div 4 Pg 1.

    11. [S1737] Probate - Wills of Waterloo Register A 1853-1871, Will of Frederick Gaukel - A-1-20: 15 Nov 1853.

    12. [S7] News - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Berliner Journal (1859-1917), 27 Jun 1872.
      Dorothea Gaukel died 25 Jun 1872 in Berlin, widow, 85 yrs.

    13. [S220] Waterloo Region Hall of Fame Waterloo Region Hall of Fame.

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 9 Jun 1784 - , Wuerttemberg, Germany Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - innkeeper - 1836 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - 1840 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - innkeeper - 1851 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - innkeeper - 1852 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsProbate - 1853 - Wilmot Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Cause: dropsy - 8 Nov 1853 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsHall of Fame - Waterloo Region - Bef 2012 - , Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - First Mennonite Cemetery, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth