Waterloo Region Generations
A record of the people of Waterloo Region, Ontario.

Paul Schmitt[1, 2]

Male 1807 - 1862  (54 years)


Personal Information    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    Event Map    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Paul Schmitt 
    Born 16 Dec 1807  , Germany Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Gender Male 
    Birth 29 Nov 1808  , Germany Find all individuals with events at this location  [4, 5, 6
    Business Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Farmer's Inn 
    Name Paul Schmidt 
    Name Paul Smith 
    Occupation 1852  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    butcher 
    Occupation 1854  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    innkeeper 
    Occupation 1861  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Inn Keeper 
    Residence 1861  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Lutheran 
    Occupation 1862  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    hotel 
    Eby ID Number Waterloo-42537 
    Died 29 Mar 1862  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [4, 5, 9
    Buried Mount Hope Cemetery, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Person ID I42537  Generations
    Last Modified 16 Oct 2021 

    Father Balthasar Schmitt,   b. Abt 1792, Remboldshausen, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Mar 1842, Queensbush, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 50 years) 
    Mother Anna Catharine,   b. 27 Sep 1792, Brecthenbach, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 May 1842  (Age 49 years) 
    Family ID F11045  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Anna Maria Ebel,   b. 27 Dec 1805, of, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Feb 1853, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 47 years) 
    Children 
     1. Helena Smith,   b. 1847, , Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     2. Catharina Carolina "Carolina" Schmidt,   b. 4 Sep 1847, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Sep 1930, Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years)
     3. Catharina Schmidt,   b. 8 May 1850, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Dec 1883, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 33 years)
    Last Modified 16 Oct 2021 
    Family ID F11046  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Elizabeth Ebel,   b. Oct 1811, , Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Married 12 Mar 1854  Greenbush (Kitchener), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    Children 
     1. Catharina Carolina "Carolina" Schmidt,   b. 4 Sep 1847, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Sep 1930, Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years)
    Last Modified 16 Oct 2021 
    Family ID F38824  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • King Street , North Side

      From Francis to Water Street.

      The ground was used by H. F. J. Jackson for stabling, etc., on his contract for building the Grand Trunk Railway through a large part of Waterloo County. Later he built his residence on this plot.

      The plot east of Water Street was used as a drill ground by the Berlin Volunteer Company of the Waterloo Battalion, 1864-67. They mostly drilled in the evenings and had some quite young volunteers, Jacob Stroh, 16 years, one of them. The trustees of the New Jerusalem Church bought the corner in 1869 and in 1870 erected the present Church. This had the first pipe organ in Berlin, built by Claus Maas of Preston.

      Haller's hat and felt-working shop. He made the first felt boots and shoes, worn largely by the farmers, in winter, in this vicinity.

      Open space up to Henry Brickner's house.

      A frame building one and one-half story high and located a little back of the street. Later a brick building was erected on the open space. At the westerly corner of Young Street Mr. Bricker built a cooperage in 1860.

      At the easterly corner of Young and King Streets was Wendell Brunner's blacksmith shop, a rough frame building. Behind it, on Young Street, was another frame building used as a waggon shop by Christian Huinbrecht.

      Vacant place and next a three story brick building, lengthwise with King Street, divided into two parts, used as stores for a short time. Later it was a paint shop and still later a warehouse for the Simpson factory across the road. The third floor of this building was the first habitat of the Berlin Militia, organized in 1864 at the time of the American Civil War. Colonel Pickering was the first drill master. He was sent from England to drill the Canadian Militia. The local company had at first no rifles and had to use Wooden substitutes for their drills.

      A three story brick building erected by C. Schneucker and used as a hotel. The third floor was a large hall used for a number of years, for balls and concerts. Paul Schmidt moved into the building in 1860. It was then called the Schneucker and Schmidt Hotel. A later landlord was Mr. Zinger and the name was changed to The North American Hotel. Toward the rear and just east of the Hotel was a barn and horse shed, with wide approach from King Street.

      A one and one-half story frame house 15 or 20 feet back from the street line with gable and veranda facing King Street, occupied by Paul Schmidt and later by his widow.

      A very early building one and one-half story, rough cast; the dwelling of Sam Trout, a blacksmith. A later occupant was James Godbold, son of Godbold who lived on the corner of Wellington and King Streets. Jacob, son of James, brakeman on the Grand Trunk, was killed while on top of a freight car in St. Mary's, the train passing under a low bridge which Godbold did not see as he was looking at a circus beside the track.

      A tailor shop was also in this building which stood originally at the corner of Foundry and King Streets.

      A two story brick building with gable toward King Street and occupied by Henry Gauntley. On the second floor there was a paint shop and at the rear a wagon shop.

      A brick building, the blacksmith shop, for many years, of Sam Trout.

      A vacant lot.

      At the Foundry St. corner a frame building, Reinhold Lang's tannery with his house, alongside, one and one-half story with frame porch. Later Mr. Lang moved his business to Charles Street, the site of the present Lang Tanning Co. plant. Jacob Y. Shantz erected the Canadian Block, three story brick, corner of King and Foundry Streets, in 1856. The front was set back from the street line and had a verandah extending to the edge of the sidewalk. There were three stores, the corner, Cole and Graf, druggists; then Wm. Young, groceries and liquors; and next H. S. Huber, general store. The old blacksmith shop was used as a warehouse by Huber.

      The Canadian Block while still fairly new, burned down about 1862 in the Spring. The fire started in the corner drug store, during the night. The walls remained standing after the fire was out but were considered dangerous and were pulled down by the firemen. One wall, in this operation, fell on H. S. Huber's warehouse, which had not been burned and in which he had large quantities of supplies. The firemen were blamed for not having notified Huber so that he could have removed his goods before the wall was thrown over.


      REMINISCENCES OF BERLIN (NOW KITCHENER) By JACOB STROH Contributed by Joseph M. Snyder.

      Part I. Settlement - Early Villagers and Buildings, Waterloo Historical Society Annual Volume 1930

      _____________________

      Queen to Benton Street.

      A few feet back of King Street and about 15 feet from South Queen Street was a vaulted cellar built of field stone by Peter Rebscher [William?] in 1838-39. In 1855 Sheriff Davidson [George Davison] bought this cellar from Paul Schmidt [Paul Schmitt 1808-1862]. He erected a frame building extending from the corner, partly using material brought from a former building at New Aberdeen, a village about five and one-half miles southwest of Berlin, where he had also a store business. Jacob Stroh helped to lath the building, receiving 75c as a day's wage. The new building was called The California Block and contained several stores. George Davidson, son of the Sheriff, occupied the corner store as a Grocery and Dry Goods business. Next there was a shed with outside stairway leading to a dance hall above it. The shed was used by the guests of Schmidt's Tavern known as the banners Inn. In the rear of the shed there was a brewery operated William Rebscher, who started to brew about 1830. The process of the Rebscher brewery was to soak the grain for 24 hours, then spread it on the cellar floor and shift it around until it commenced to sprout, after which it was carried upstairs again and put into a dry-kiln about 20 x 20 feet in size, the grain being on screens exposed to the heat coming from below. The dry malt was crushed and ground between iron rollers turned by hand. Later on a steam engine supplied the required power. Mr. Rebscher had this brewery until about 1855, when he moved to Frederick Street on Spetz Street.

      Sheriff Davidson bought the shed and converted it into two stores. One of these was occupied by Conrad Schmidt who sold wines, liquors, groceries and hardware. Yost Kimmel had a meat shop under the stores.

      Next came an open space and a well and next to that a building which was used 1830 to 1835 as a church by a body known as Mifferites whose main article of belief was that the world was coming to an end in 1835. Many of the Millerites, faithful to their belief, sold their properties and household effects. The building was about 1840 occupied by Paul Schmidt, as the Farmer's Inn already spoken of.

      Next came an alleyway and next to that William Moore's general store. Mr. Moore's residence was next to his store. Later on it had a clock factory on the second floor for a short time Next came a three-story building erected in 1860 and next to that no building for a long time until the Boehmer Block was erected. This had a clock factory on the second floor for a short time. Next came a building occupied by Mr. Hymmen, erected between 1850 and 1855. The building was painted a buff color and occupied as a bakery. In 1860, E. R. Hayne had a bakery and confectionery store in the Hymmen building. Next came a two-story frame building located on the site of the westerly half of the present Post Office and occupied by William, David and Frederick Miller as the first general store in Berlin. The location was opposite the end of Frederick Street. J. F. Kannengieser had a tailor shop and was also dealer in fancy goods in this building at one time. In 1860 Mr. and Mrs. John Albright occupied part of the building as a dressmaking and millinery shop. Later on Mr. Rooke had a lock and gunsmith shop on the street floor while his family lived above. There was a high board fence on the Benton Street line with balsam trees planted along the inside.

      REMINISCENCES OF BERLIN (NOW KITCHENER) By JACOB STROH Contributed by Joseph M. Snyder.

      Part I. Settlement - Early Villagers and Buildings, Waterloo Historical Society Annual Volume 1930

  • Sources 
    1. [S4] Vit - ON - Marriage Registration.
      Peter Brill Born: New Hamburg Age: 34 Est. Birth: abt 1852 Father: Peter Brill Mother: Margaret Born Ritz Brill married Caroline Schmidt Age:: 34 Est. Birth: abt 1852 Born: Berlin Father: Paul Schmidt Mother: Marie Born Schalfer Schmidt married 28 Sep 1886 Marriage Place: Waterloo, New Hamburg

    2. [S6] Church Records - ON, Waterloo - Bindeman, F. W. - Card Index Kitchener Public Library.
      Anna Catharine Schmitt born 27 Sep 1792 Brectenbach, died 29 may 1842, buried 31 May 1842 Wengars wife of Balthasar (deceased)

    3. [S131] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo Twp. - 1851.
      Paul SCHMITT Butcher Germany 45 Lutheran b. 16-Dec
      Maria SCHMITT Germany 45 Lutheran b. 28-Dec
      Carolina SCHMITT Canada 5 Lutheran b. 6-Aug
      Katharina SCHMITT Canada 2 Lutheran b. 8-May
      Katharna EBEL Germany 73 Lutheran b. 6-Apr
      Elisbeth EBEL Germany 40 Lutheran b. October

    4. [S6] Church Records - ON, Waterloo - Bindeman, F. W. - Card Index Kitchener Public Library, #1 pg 166.
      Paul Schmitt, died 29 mar 1862 aged 53y, 4m, hotel ____ of Berlin, cause; rheum. fever.

    5. [S166] Cemetery - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Mount Hope CC#4508 Internet Link .
      Hier ruhen / Paul Schmitt / gest. 30 Maerz 1862 / Alt. 53 Jah. / Maria / Ehefrau von / Paul Schmitt / gest. 1 Feb. 1853 / Alt. 45 Jah.

    6. [S123] Census - ON, Waterloo, Berlin - 1861, Div. 2 Page 19.

    7. [S131] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo Twp. - 1851, Div 4 pg 200.

    8. [S6] Church Records - ON, Waterloo - Bindeman, F. W. - Card Index Kitchener Public Library.
      Paul Schmitt, innkeeper of Berlin married 12 Mar 1854 in Greenbush by banns to Elisabeth Ebel of Berlin, wit: Franz Bussenberger & C. L. Bindemann

    9. [S1592] Census - ON, Waterloo, Berlin - 1891, Section 1 Page 44.

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 16 Dec 1807 - , Germany Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBirth - 29 Nov 1808 - , Germany Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBusiness - Farmer's Inn - - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - butcher - 1852 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - innkeeper - 1854 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 12 Mar 1854 - Greenbush (Kitchener), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Inn Keeper - 1861 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - Lutheran - 1861 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - hotel - 1862 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 29 Mar 1862 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Mount Hope Cemetery, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth