Waterloo Region Generations
A record of the people of Waterloo Region, Ontario.
Jacob Gaukel Stroh

Jacob Gaukel Stroh[1]

Male 1848 - 1935  (86 years)

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  • Name Jacob Gaukel Stroh 
    Born 25 Sep 1848  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
    Christened 10 Dec 1848  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Gender Male 
    Interesting pioneer, story, history, building 
    Name J. G. Stroh 
    Residence 1861  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    New Jerusalem 
    Residence 1870  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Occupation 1871  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [10
    Tanner 
    Residence 1871  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [10
    New Jerusalem 
    Occupation 1872  Guelph City, Wellington Co., Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [11
    tanner 
    Occupation 1881  Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Farmer 
    Residence 1881  Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Swedenborgian 
    Occupation 1891  Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    Turner 
    Residence 1891  Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    New Jerusalem 
    Occupation 1901  Waterloo, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Tanner 
    Occupation 1911  Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    Tanner 
    Residence 72 Erb St. E., Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Waterloo-ErbSt.E0072-0001-artistrenderingpropoal.jpg
    Waterloo-ErbSt.E0072-0001-artistrenderingpropoal.jpg
    72 Erb St. E Waterloo | Vanguard Developments. (2018). Vanguarddevelopments.com. Retrieved 12 August 2018, from https://vanguarddevelopments.com/72Erb.html
    72 Erb Street East, Waterloo, Waterloo Region, Ontario
    72 Erb Street East, Waterloo, Waterloo Region, Ontario
    Image from glass plate at Kitchener Public Library
    Residence 1911  Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    Swedenborgian 
    Residence 1935  72 Erb St. E., Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Eby ID Number Waterloo-43723 
    Died 23 May 1935  Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Mount Hope Cemetery, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I43723  Generations
    Last Modified 18 Nov 2021 

    Father Henry Stroh,   b. 5 Nov 1818, , Hessen, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Jun 1901, Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years) 
    Mother Susannah Gaukel,   b. 18 Sep 1824, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 May 1873, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 48 years) 
    Married 1 Sep 1840  Greenbush (Kitchener), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [12, 13
    Family ID F11403  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Elisabeth "Lizzie" Seiler,   b. 7 May 1846, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 May 1913, Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 67 years) 
    Married 9 Oct 1870  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [9, 10, 14
    Children 
     1. Ida Dorothea Stroh,   b. 12 Feb 1872,   d. 11 Nov 1880, Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 8 years)
     2. Ella Louisa Stroh,   b. 20 Feb 1875, Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1965  (Age 89 years)
     3. Edward Emanuel Stroh,   b. 16 Jun 1877, Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Nov 1880, Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 3 years)
     4. Edgar Samuel Stroh,   b. 16 Oct 1880, Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Apr 1881  (Age 0 years)
     5. Edna Lenora Stroh,   b. 23 Mar 1882, Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     6. Lorena Olivia Stroh,   b. 27 Jul 1884, Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1972  (Age 87 years)
     7. Albertha Luella May Stroh,   b. 19 Nov 1887, Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     8. Nathaniel C. Stroh,   b. 8 Feb 1891, Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Jul 1964  (Age 73 years)
    Last Modified 18 Nov 2021 
    Family ID F11402  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Jacob G. Stroh
    Jacob G. Stroh
    from Waterloo Region Hall of Fame

  • Notes 
    • There is in Waterloo Park a valuable Indian relic in the form of an irregularly shaped stone, weighing 1000 to 1500 pounds. On the upper or grinding surface, there are six or more shallow circular depressions or basins, each being eight to fourteen inches in diameter, where the Indians had worn them hollow in grinding their tomahawks and other articles made of stone. This grindstone was brought to Waterloo Park by Jacob Stroh in 1890. It was found at Glennie's Springs, north of Conestogo, where no doubt there existed an Indian village centuries ago.

      There has recently arrived at the Park as a loan from Mr. Stroh, another useful article used by the early Indians of Waterloo County in a village that existed at that time. It is a very large stone of grey granite, about three by six feet in dimension, and weighing approximately a ton and a half. One side of this huge stone is flat, and a part of this upper flat surface was used by the Indians in grinding grain and nuts and pulping food. This surface contains two shallow bowls or circular depressions, each about a foot in diameter, which were used in grinding food. The other half or more of the large flat surface is worn and polished very smoothly and was no doubt used in dressing skins and furs, which were the clothing of the Indians in those early days.

      This latter stone was found on the site of an Indian village at Suraras Springs on the Huron Road, two miles south of Mannheim.

      These relics of an early occupation of Waterloo County have been placed near the old log building in Waterloo Park which was the first schoolhouse in the settlement that became the Town of Waterloo. It was built in 1820.

      A history of the Town of Waterloo and surrounding district must therefore, begin with its occupation by the Indians at some remote period, Indians probably of numerous earlier tribes before the Government granted the 12-mile strip of land along the Grand River to the Six Nation Indians.

      Mr. Jacob Stroh, a naturalist and archaeologist of more than local repute, has devoted many years to a study of the Indians of this district, and has gathered one of the finest collections of Indian remains in Canada. He has located quite a number of their village sites throughout the County, at points not too far from the Grand River, and nearly always near a sparkling spring. It is clearly noticeable that a number of these villages had been fortified, probably as a protection against wild animals, or perhaps against other tribes.

      Some of these ancient Indian villages lie just outside the Waterloo corporation limits, and at least one of them is in the Town itself.
      Mr. Stroh has proved his surmise correct on many occasions by finding accumulations of ashes from their camp fires in spots as yet untouched by the white man's plough, some of these being under the stumps of one time huge trees, hundreds of years old, that have grown over these ash heaps; also, many of his stone implements, pottery and other objects were excavated at these Indian village sites.1a

      Sixteenth Annual Report of the Waterloo Historical Society, 1928, A Historical Sketch of the Town of Waterloo, Ontario, Clayton W. Wells, L.D.S., D. D. S.

      _________________________________

      INDIAN RELICS COLLECTED BY JACOB GAUKEL STROH
      By Nathaniel Stroh

      During the pioneer days of the 1850's Frederick Gaukel, a congenial tavern keeper, managed a hostelry on the western corner of King and Queen Streets. Frederick and Gaukel Streets were named after him in recognition of his efforts, with those of other villagers, to secure the county seat for Berlin, and also because he donated the land upon which the county court house now stands.

      On their journeys over the Indian trail leading from Detroit through Berlin to Guelph, and then up to the Midland district, tall, handsome, well-built Mohawks would stop at the Gaukel tavern, where, in return for the "Wirt's" hospitality, they would entertain the populace with ceremonial dances. Their appearances were most colourful with plaid, yellow or bright red shawls or blankets which were draped over their shoulders and held in place over the left, with the right hand.

      Born and brought up about 500 feet from the main intersection of the village, on Queen Street south, Jacob Gaukel Stroh took full advantage of these periodic visits of the Indians. Being the tavern keeper's grandson, he naturally was not prevented from spending many fascinating evenings watching and listening to these copper coloured folk.

      Young Jacob was so impressed by the transient Indians that he tried his best to find out all about them and how they lived in the past. During his youth he went on many trips with his father into the deep forest and across the small clearings of the early settlers. Not only was it their objective to secure honey from the wild bees, but it was also necessary to secure meat with the rifle and fish with the net. On these trips a careful eye was kept open for odd stones and Indian relics. A lover of nature, he devoted considerable time to becoming acquainted with the flora and fauna of the country, so he had opportunity to note the spots where Indians had had their encampments. These specific areas of campsites were searched and researched many times, and their exact location he carefully guarded as his secrets.

      Throughout his life this naturalist operated a small tannery, and to his leather and fur establishment came the farmers with hides and furs to be tanned. In all cases he would show the various tillers of the soil the types of Indian stones he himself had found, asking them to kindly look out for similar samples while plowing their fields. In return for the pieces found and brought to the tannery, he would offer to tan some small skin or fur, such as the muskrat, mink, and raccoon. Or he might offer a leather tie strap for the horse, and in later years when he discontinued tanning, he paid nominal sums for the farmers' finds.

      This collection of Indian relics was presented by the Stroh Estate to the Waterloo Historical Society in 1957, and will be on display so that all who are interested will be able to study the various pieces.

      Waterloo Historical Society, Annual Volume 1957

      ________________________

      Dispute over Stroh house near uptown Waterloo
      Residents oppose plan to add four-storey addition to rear of building on Erb Street


      A proposal to preserve the century-old home at 72 Erb St. E. and build a four-storey addition at the rear received some opposition from area residents last week at city council.

      The developer, Vanguard Developments Corporation, is seeking several zoning exemptions from the city, including increasing the maximum height from 12 metres to 17 metres, increase the maximum density from 100 units per hectare to 136 units, and reduce the parking requirements from 1.09 spaces per unit to one space per unit....

      The redevelopment plan would preserve the current brick building at 72 Erb St. E., built around 1890 and the former home of Jacob Gaukel Stroh, a local tanner, historian, photographer and educator. The home is not a designated heritage site nor is it included on the city's heritage registry....

      Dispute over Stroh house near uptown Waterloo. (2016). Waterloochronicle.ca. Retrieved 24 June 2016, from https://www.waterloochronicle.ca/news-story/6735006-dispute-over-stroh-house-near-uptown-waterloo/

      __________________________

      King Street , North Side

      From Francis to Water Street.

      he ground was used by H. F. J. Jackson for stabling, etc., on his contract for building the Grand Trunk Railway through a large part of Waterloo County. Later he built his residence on this plot.

      The plot east of Water Street was used as a drill ground by the Berlin Volunteer Company of the Waterloo Battalion, 1864-67. They mostly drilled in the evenings and had some quite young volunteers, Jacob Stroh, 16 years, one of them. The trustees of the New Jerusalem Church bought the corner in 1869 and in 1870 erected the present Church. This had the first pipe organ in Berlin, built by Claus Maas of Preston.

      Haller's hat and felt-working shop. He made the first felt boots and shoes, worn largely by the farmers, in winter, in this vicinity.

      Open space up to Henry Brickner's house.

      A frame building one and one-half story high and located a little back of the street. Later a brick building was erected on the open space. At the westerly corner of Young Street Mr. Bricker built a cooperage in 1860.

      At the easterly corner of Young and King Streets was Wendell Brunner's blacksmith shop, a rough frame building. Behind it, on Young Street, was another frame building used as a waggon shop by Christian Huinbrecht.

      Vacant place and next a three story brick building, lengthwise with King Street, divided into two parts, used as stores for a short time. Later it was a paint shop and still later a warehouse for the Simpson factory across the road. The third floor of this building was the first habitat of the Berlin Militia, organized in 1864 at the time of the American Civil War. Colonel Pickering was the first drill master. He was sent from England to drill the Canadian Militia. The local company had at first no rifles and had to use Wooden substitutes for their drills.

      A three story brick building erected by C. Schneucker and used as a hotel. The third floor was a large hall used for a number of years, for balls and concerts. Paul Schmidt moved into the building in 1860. It was then called the Schneucker and Schmidt Hotel. A later landlord was Mr. Zinger and the name was changed to The North American Hotel. Toward the rear and just east of the Hotel was a barn and horse shed, with wide approach from King Street.

      A one and one-half story frame house 15 or 20 feet back from the street line with gable and veranda facing King Street, occupied by Paul Schmidt and later by his widow.

      A very early building one and one-half story, rough cast; the dwelling of Sam Trout, a blacksmith. A later occupant was James Godbold, son of Godbold who lived on the corner of Wellington and King Streets. Jacob, son of James, brakeman on the Grand Trunk, was killed while on top of a freight car in St. Mary's, the train passing under a low bridge which Godbold did not see as he was looking at a circus beside the track.

      A tailor shop was also in this building which stood originally at the corner of Foundry and King Streets.

      A two story brick building with gable toward King Street and occupied by Henry Gauntley. On the second floor there was a paint shop and at the rear a wagon shop.

      A brick building, the blacksmith shop, for many years, of Sam Trout.

      A vacant lot.

      At the Foundry St. corner a frame building, Reinhold Lang's tannery with his house, alongside, one and one-half story with frame porch. Later Mr. Lang moved his business to Charles Street, the site of the present Lang Tanning Co. plant. Jacob Y. Shantz erected the Canadian Block, three story brick, corner of King and Foundry Streets, in 1856. The front was set back from the street line and had a verandah extending to the edge of the sidewalk. There were three stores, the corner, Cole and Graf, druggists; then Wm. Young, groceries and liquors; and next H. S. Huber, general store. The old blacksmith shop was used as a warehouse by Huber.

      The Canadian Block while still fairly new, burned down about 1862 in the Spring. The fire started in the corner drug store, during the night. The walls remained standing after the fire was out but were considered dangerous and were pulled down by the firemen. One wall, in this operation, fell on H. S. Huber's warehouse, which had not been burned and in which he had large quantities of supplies. The firemen were blamed for not having notified Huber so that he could have removed his goods before the wall was thrown over.


      REMINISCENCES OF BERLIN (NOW KITCHENER) By JACOB STROH Contributed by Joseph M. Snyder.

      Part I. Settlement - Early Villagers and Buildings, Waterloo Historical Society Annual Volume 1930

      ___________________

      King Street , North Side

      Frederick Street.

      Bishop Benjamin Eby's farm came to the corner of King and Frederick Streets. Next to Frederick Street, Frederick and William Miller erected a frame building and used it as a general store. After the grading operations spoken of this building had to undergo the same process as the St. Nicholas Hotel. It was considered a fine building in its day with large windows on each side of the centre door. Henry Stroh finally bought the building and tore it down in 1868. Jacob Stroh has some of the window sash, shutters, stairway, etc., still in his possession. Later the building was occupied by Jacob Eckstein cigar maker and tobacco dealer. Mrs. Warren with a family lived on the second story for a number of years.

      Vacant lot. Next a large brick building with double deck porch along the front, the Queen's Arms Hotel, built about 1840 and continued as a hotel until about 1860. A Mr. Butchard was the first landlord and later Levi Weber. From this hotel the first omnibus met the trains at the G.T.R. station in Berlin in 1856. Before that day it was a stopping place of stage coaches operating from Hamilton and Galt to Berlin and beyond. The old Queen's Arms long vacant and practically ruined as a building was sold finally and made room for the Market Building and Town Hall in 1869.*

      Next we come to the John Roos house. This also had a double-deck veranda with heavy posts as was the style 1840-50. The building was later turned into a hotel known as the Market Hotel and kept by Casper Heller.

      A lot with a log cabin in the rear, occupied by Jacob Sauer, who had come from Pennsylvania, father of Mrs. John Roat.

      * See 1922 Annual Report W. H. S., p. 210.

      A harness shop occupied by John Roat, then by his son John and later by John Haugh, a son-in-law of John Roat.

      A garden. A dwelling, 4 or 5 feet lower than the street which had been filled up, where lived the Susand family. Mrs. Susand had a reputation with juveniles for tarts and molasses taffy sold in lc. bars. Her children were in the habit of selling these wares to passengers at the G.T.R. station. After her husband's death about 1860, widow Susand moved her shop to Foundry Street North, and there continued until she died. Susand was an ex-slave. In 1857 at a nomination meeting for Council, he was nominated and stood a good chance of being elected, as a joke. However, the more thoughtful element among the voters prevailed.

      A two story, frame building, lengthwise with King Street, built in the '30's. After street grading this had to be raised so that what had before been the ground floor became the cellar or basement.

      A house occupied by Wm. Hawke,-known as Bill Hawke- a mason. A stout, easy-going man. His wife was in the habit of standing in the door way, with white lace cap, smoking a clay pipe. The east end of this building was occupied by Winters, a hatter, the first hat maker in Berlin. He made the old style, broad brim, Mennonite hats in fashion up to about 1845. At the corner of Scott stood a brick building of good size with gable toward King Street, used to stable the first fire teams for a number of years. Later John Wagner had a waggon shop above and George Ward a blacksmith shop underneath. Scott Street was, however, not opened until many years later.

      A one and one-half story building rough cast, gable facing King St., occupied by H. W. Peterson, who began publishing the "Canada Museum", in 1835 and so continued until 1840 when he went to Guelph as first Registrar of the County of Wellington. This was the first newspaper published in Waterloo County.

      Jacob Hailer's house, a one and one-half story, frame building with porch along the front partly enclosed by lattice work. In this house was born in 1834, Catherine Hailer, who married Louis Breithaupt. She is said to have been the first child born in Berlin of parents who came from Germany. Hailer's barn was some distance back from the street and next along on the street front was his shop where he manufactured spinning wheels, etc., and chairs which had a large distribution. Hailer was an expert wood turner. He had two foot-power lathes and a number of German assistants from time to time, continuing his shop for about 40 years.
      A two story frame building lengthwise with King Street, erected by Dr. John Scott. He had a drug store with two good-sized windows at the front. On the east gable of the building was a sign, "Med. Hall" in large letters. The sign was legible long after Dr. Scott's death. The doctor pursued his practice on horseback for which he used three horses. He was the first medical practitioner in Berlin, coming in 1834, at the time of the cholera epidemic. For a few years before he was married he boarded at the Gaukel Hotel. His later house, after the one described, is still standing on Weber Street at the rear of the Kitchener Public Library.

      The old Scott house on King Street was later occupied by Franz Martin who kept a saloon. Martin had a musical family, with the zither as their principal instrument, which all the children could play.

      A one and one-half story, frame building, painted, occupied by Anslm Wagner, a potter.

      A brick building 1 ½ story lengthwise with King Street, the west end of which was John Eby's drug store, the rest of the building being his dwelling. This was the first regular drug store in Berlin.

      A brick building with a frame extension in the rear used by David Eby as a pump shop. Part of the brick building is still standing, the rest having been cut olT for the opening of Eby Street North.

      A one story hip roof brick cottage occupied by Geo. Eby, a Notary, who came to Canada in 1804. He died in this house. A considerable fish story is told of how he followed a sturgeon in the Conestoga River, part of Grand River, and finally speared it.

      A one and one-half story building, probably rough cast, occupied by Hy. Wurm, a carpenter employed at the Simpson factory.

      A two story brick building painted red occupied by Henry S. Huber.

      A handsome brick building, two story, with veranda along the front and ground floor considerably above the street level, with broad steps, the width of the building, leading to it, was built in 1850. Some time later it was occupied by Casper Heller and known as the Royal Exchange hotel. Following the old custom its swinging sign had "Last Chance" on the side toward the village and "First Chance" outward, referring to liquid refreshments. Heller kept a good hotel and had also a large shed and ham next east of the hotel.

      On the corner a steam grist mill was erected, about 1860. Louis Seyler, a German, was the miller. The custom was for farmers to bring in their wheat to have it ground, getting in return flour, bran and middlings, the miller retaining his toll. Later Lehnen & Shelly operated this mill.

      REMINISCENCES OF BERLIN (NOW KITCHENER) By JACOB STROH Contributed by Joseph M. Snyder.

      Part I. Settlement - Early Villagers and Buildings, Waterloo Historical Society Annual Volume 1930

      _______________________

      QUEEN STREET SOUTH, EAST SIDE.

      On the corner of King Street Rehscher's vaulted cellar already spoken of.

      An open space.

      A two-story rough-cast building with two-story veranda along the Queen Street front built by Martin Anthes (father of John S. Anthes) in 1835 when it was considered one of the best houses in the village. Henry Stroh purchased this house from Mr. Anthes about 1837. Jacob Stroh was born in this house. Behind it there was a garden of about an acre of land. There were 31 pine stumps on the property when Mr. Stroh took possession and these stumps had to be laboriously removed as stump- pulling machines, which came later, were not then available. The well on the lot was only nine feet deep. Henry Stroh carried on a shoe shop in his house until he entered into partnership with Carl Kranz, on King Street.

      In 1857, after he had dissolved partnership with Kranz, Henry Stroh built a one and one-half story frame building next to his house and used it as a shoe store. Mr. Stroh continued in this shoe business until 1863 when he went into partnership with Mr. Reinhold Lang, the tanner. The Queen Street shoe shop was changed to a dwelling. Later Mr. Vanderhart, a tailor, had his shop in this building and after him Carl Englehart had it as photographer. Henry Stroh sold his house to George King. Later Charles Ahrens owned it and had it moved to the corner of Shanley and Braun Streets about 1880.

      A one and one-half story frame building erected about 1837 by Jacob Kraemer, later on Frederick Street, as spoken of. Later an addition was added to the front and the building used as the local post office, with William Davidson in charge. Later George Seip purchased the building and used it as a saloon, with a bowling alley in the rear, the first bowling alley in Berlin. William Jaffray lived in the house for a time and later William Knell, son-in-law of Mr. Seip.

      A one and one-half story frame building, originally a cooper shop, later the dwelling of Mr. Seip, after he sold the other building. In 1860 he built a brewery, known as Seip's brewery. Under the whole building he had a vaulted cellar built of field stone. Power for the brewery was supplied by a horse-power contained in an attached shed, shelter for the horses. Seip had a high reputation for good beer. He at first made his own malt, but later purchased it. After George Seip's death his son Louis continued the business until about 1880. The building was finally torn down to make room for the present auditorium.

      The cooper shop, a small one story building, with brick chimney such as coopers used to heat staves for their barrel making, operated by Henry Brickner who later had his shop at the corner of Young and King Streets. Later Adam Stein had the Queen Street cooper shop. The Berlin coopers were experts in the making of what was called tight-wear,that is water-tight barrels, in large tuns which they made for the brewers.

      A very early building, occupied by John Peters, a cabinet maker in Hoffman's factory, about 1860. The building had an outside stairway at the back. Peters was a bird lover and expert in trapping native song birds, mocking birds, cat birds, finches, etc., which he hung under his veranda roof in public display.

      On the corner of Church Street a frame house occupied by Mr. Knechtel, a weaver, about 1842-1850. Knechtel moved to a farm in Mannheim where later he was injured in the spine by a falling tree to such an extent that he was bedfast for fourteen or fifteen years. He lived to about 1871. Conrad Doering occupied the Queen Street house for a time. He also was a weaver and made coverlets, etc. The house was torn down to make room for the present one of brick built by Dr. Clemens and later occupied by the late Dr. Walters.

      Church Street.

      On the south side St. Paul's Lutheran Church.

      A one and one-half story unpainted frame building with gable towards the street, the dwelling, about 1860, of John Fleischauer, a laborer, a native of Hessen, Germany.

      A one and one-half story house occupied by E. Kern, cabinet maker, about 1860 and later by John Ansted.

      A vacant lot.

      George Street.

      Joseph Schneider originally owned all the land between George Street and Mill Street, mostly woods at that time, and extending to Benton and Eby Streets.


      REMINISCENCES OF BERLIN (NOW KITCHENER) By JACOB STROH Contributed by Joseph M. Snyder.

      Part I. Settlement - Early Villagers and Buildings, Waterloo Historical Society Annual Volume 1930

  • Sources 
    1. [S7] News - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Berliner Journal (1859-1917), 18 Nov 1880.
      Nov. 15, 1880 Edward Emanuel Stroh, son of Jakob G. Stroh, died in Waterloo at age of 3 years & 5 months.

    2. [S131] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo Twp. - 1851, Div 4 Pg 190.

    3. [S135] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo City - 1901, Waterloo (Town/Ville) D-4 Page 7.

    4. [S6] Church Records - ON, Waterloo - Bindeman, F. W. - Card Index Kitchener Public Library.
      Jacob Stroh s/o Henry & Susanna Gaukel of Berlin, b. 25 Sep 1848, bapt. 10 Dec 1848, sponsors: Conrad Stroh, parents

    5. [S2] Church Records - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Church of the New Jerusalem (Swedenborgian).
      Bridegroom Name: Jacob G. Stroh Age: 22 Res: Berlin Place of Birth: Berlin Names of Parents: Henrich & Sussana Stroh Bride: Name: Lizzie Seiler Age: 24 Res: Berlin Place of Birth: Waterloo Tp. Names of Parents: George & Maria Seiler Witness(S): Name: Henny Stroh Jr. Res: Berlin Name: Amenda Seiler Res: Berlin Oct. 9, 1870

    6. [S302] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo City - 1881, Waterloo Village 1881 Div. 1 Page 18.

    7. [S123] Census - ON, Waterloo, Berlin - 1861, Div. 4 Page 35.

    8. [S366] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo City - 1911, Div. 42 Page 6.

    9. [S1573] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo City - 1891, Section 3 Page 32.

    10. [S229] Census - ON, Waterloo, Berlin - 1871, Sect. 2 Page 16.

    11. [S57] Vit - ON - Birth Registration.
      Ida Dorothea Stroh Born: 12 Feb 1872 County: Wellington Father: Jacob Stroh Mother: Elizabeth Seiler

    12. [S13] Vit - - ON, Waterloo - Wellington District Marriage Register Part 1 1840-1852, Rev'd F. W. Bindemann, Minister of the German Evangelical Protestant Church at Greenbush Village, Waterloo Township, Halton County, Wellington District, 31 Aug. 1840 to 31 Aug. 1841.
      Henry STROH, Shoemaker, to Susanna GAUNEL, both of Waterloo. Rev. BINDEMANN. Wit. Charles H, AHRENS, Carpenter and Conrad STROH, Labourer, both of Waterloo.

    13. [S9] News - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Canada Museum und Allgemeine Zeitung (1835-1840), 4 Sep 1840:17.
      last Tuesday Rev Bindemann m. Joh. Heinrich Stroh to Spr Susanna Gaukel, daughter of Friederich Gaukel, innkeeper, all from the city of Berlin.

    14. [S4] Vit - ON - Marriage Registration.
      Jacob G Stroh Born: Canada Age: 22 Father: Henry Stroh Mother: Susannah Stroh Born: abt 1848 Spouse: Lizzie Seiler Age: 24 born: Canada Father: George Seiler Mother: Maria Seiler married 9 Oct 1870 married: Waterloo, Berlin

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 25 Sep 1848 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChristened - 10 Dec 1848 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - New Jerusalem - 1861 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1870 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 9 Oct 1870 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Tanner - 1871 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - New Jerusalem - 1871 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - tanner - 1872 - Guelph City, Wellington Co., Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Farmer - 1881 - Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - Swedenborgian - 1881 - Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Turner - 1891 - Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - New Jerusalem - 1891 - Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Tanner - 1901 - Waterloo, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Tanner - 1911 - Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - - 72 Erb St. E., Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - Swedenborgian - 1911 - Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1935 - 72 Erb St. E., Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 23 May 1935 - Waterloo City, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Mount Hope Cemetery, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
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