Waterloo Region Generations
A record of the people of Waterloo Region, Ontario.
Jacob D. Shoemaker

Jacob D. Shoemaker[1]

Male 1799 - 1902  (102 years)

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  • Name Jacob D. Shoemaker 
    Born 24 Nov 1799  Swamp Creek, Frederick Twp., Montgomery Co., Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
    Gender Male 
    Honoured Lakeside Park, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Lakeside Park in Kitchener was once part of his property. The Lake is called Shoemaker Lake 
    Retired 1801  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Immigration 1829  , Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [10
    Land Bef 1831  Waterloo Township - German Company Tract Lot 019, Waterloo County, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location  [12
    Name Jakob D Schumacher  [13
    Occupation 1852  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [14
    farmer 
    Occupation 1861  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [11
    Farmer 
    Religion 1861  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [15
    Mennonite 
    Occupation 1871  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    Gentleman 
    Occupation 1881  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    Farmer 
    Religion 1881  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    Mennonite 
    Residence 38 Shirk Place, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Eby ID Number 00112-7042 
    Died 12 Mar 1902  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [4, 6
    Cause: Old Age 
    Buried First Mennonite Cemetery, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [4, 6
    Person ID I4875  Generations
    Last Modified 1 Dec 2019 

    Father George Shoemaker, Sr.,   b. 6 Feb 1778, Frederick Twp., Montgomery Co., Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Nov 1864, , Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 86 years) 
    Mother Mary Detweiler,   b. 10 May 1775, Of, Montgomery Co. Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Sep 1850  (Age 75 years) 
    Married 19 Mar 1799  [16
    Family ID F1494  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Jane Dunbar,   b. 8 Feb 1798, , , Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Aug 1880, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years) 
    Married 18 Nov 1823  , , Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [4, 10, 17
    Children 
     1. Mary Ann Shoemaker,   b. 7 Nov 1824, Skippack Twp., Montgomery Co., Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Jul 1876  (Age 51 years)
     2. David Shoemaker,   b. 31 Jan 1827, Skippack Twp., Montgomery Co., Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Oct 1827, Skippack Twp., Montgomery Co., Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
     3. Elizabeth Shoemaker,   b. 2 Oct 1828, Skippack Twp., Montgomery Co., Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Apr 1854  (Age 25 years)
     4. Martha Shoemaker,   b. 9 Jun 1831, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     5. George D. Shoemaker,   b. 11 Feb 1834, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Oct 1910, Woolwich Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years)
     6. Alexander Shoemaker,   b. 21 Feb 1836, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Aug 1908  (Age 72 years)
     7. Naomi Shoemaker,   b. 2 Jun 1838, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Jul 1931  (Age 93 years)
     8. Jane Shoemaker,   b. 30 Dec 1840, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Aug 1860, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 19 years)
     9. Magdalena Shoemaker,   b. 16 Jan 1844, Maryhill (New Germany) Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     10. Jacob Shoemaker,   b. 16 Jan 1844, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Jan 1844, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
    Last Modified 2 Dec 2019 
    Family ID F1488  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Jacob D. Shoemaker
    Jacob D. Shoemaker
    Jacob D. Shoemaker
    Jacob D. Shoemaker
    source Murray Fried

  • Notes 
    • Jacob D. Shoemaker, "the eldest son of George Shoemaker, was born on his grandfather's place near the old mills on Swamp Creek, Frederick Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, November 24th, 1799. His boyhood days were spent in assisting his father in the woollen mills, carding and dying wool and yarns. From his fifteenth to his eighteenth year he was engaged in the grist and oil mills and during the wool season he assisted his father in the carding mills. When eighteen years of age he hired himself to John Funk who during that time had the misfortune of having his dwelling destroyed by fire, Shoemaker losing all his earthly possessions except the clothing he wore at the time. After quitting at John Funk's in the fall of 1818, he obtained work for a short time in a tannery near Pottsgrove. In spring of 1819 he attended school for six weeks in Lower Salford Township, Montgomery County. During the summer he labored for six months with David Allebach, in Skippack Township, at $12 per month. He paid out his wages $50 annually to his parents until he became of age.

      After having served his six months he attended school another six weeks in Lower Salford Township. His teacher's name was Mr. Borsch. This then finished his school days. In 1820 he engaged himself to Abraham Clemens where he remained for two years, receiving $80 for the first year's wages and $72 for the second year. During the year 1822 he worked for George Reiff of Skippack Township, for $80 per year. The following year he spent in working by the day among the farmers. On November 18th, 1823, he was married to Jane, daughter of Alexander Dunbar. She was raised by Jacob Merkley who resided on the Perkiomen Creek, Skippack Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. In spring of 1824 he, in company with his wife moved to Joseph Lowery in Skippack whose farm he managed for five years. He received one-third of the product of the farm as wages for his labor and management. The annual income thus derived generally amounted to about $80.

      In 1829 they with their family of two children, his parents, and two of his brothers and one sister, namely, Daniel, Joshua and Catharine, moved to Canada and came to what is now Bridgeport. Here he was engaged with Jacob S. Shoemaker who had come to Canada in 1820. During the fall of 1829 he worked on the sawmills erected the same year. While engaged here he purchased pine logs from Henry Erb who resided on lot No. 58, German Company's Tract, and had them sawed during the winter and drawn on his farm where he had a small shanty put up. Into this shanty they moved in April, 1830. The year previously he had purchased his farm, being south-west half of lot No. 19, Germam Company's Tract. containing 224 acres. During his first year on this extensive farm large clearings were made and a two-story log dwelling, 24x28 feet, erected. The log barn was erected the year following. In 1851 he erected the stone dwelling now occupied by his son, Alexander, and in 1842, he put up the large frame barn still standing. He is still living and enjoying good health and has his home with his son, Alexander who resides on the old homestead. His family consisted of ten children, of whom two died in infancy."


      Eby, Ezra E. (1895). A biographical history of Waterloo township and other townships of the county: being a history of the early settlers and their descendants, mostly all of Pennsylvania Dutch origin: as also much other unpublished historical information chiefly of a local character. Berlin [Kitchener, Ont.]: [s.n.].

      __________________________________________________

      JACOB C. SHOEMAKER
      ,

      The well-known centenarian of Berlin, Ontario, Bro. Jacob Shoemaker, died on Wednesday afternoon, March 12, 1902, at three o'clock, at the old homestead, occupied by his son, Alexander Shoemaker. The cause of death was due to old age. Bro. Shoemaker having reached the age of 102 years, 3 months, and 9 days. He had been confined to his bed for the past few months, and although he received every possible attention he passed peacefully away. Though death was not unexpected, he will be missed by those with whom he has been surrounded during the latter part of his life. Bro. Shoemaker was extremely kind hearted and the attention and the self sacrifice shown him by his children was always appreciated, and he never lost an opportunity of referring to their kindness to his friends who would visit him at his home.

      Jacob D. Shoemaker was the eldest son of George Shoemaker, and was born on his grandfather's place near the old mills on Swamp Creek, Frederick township, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, November 24th, 1799. His boyhood days were spent in assisting his father in the woolen mills, carding and dying wool and yarns. From his fifteenth to his eighteenth year he was engaged in the grist and oil mills and during the wool season he assisted his father in the carding mills. When eighteen years of age he hired himself to John Funk who, during that time, had the misfortune to have his dwelling destroyed by fire, Bro. Shoemaker losing all his earthly possessions except the clothing he wore at the time. After quitting at John Funk's in the fall of 1818 he obtained work for a short time in a tannery near Pottsgrove. In the spring of 1819 he attended school for six weeks in Lower Salford township, Montgomery County. During the summer he labored for six months with David Allebach, in Skippack township, at twelve dollars per month. After having served his six months he attended school another six weeks in Lower Salford. This finished his school days. In 1820 he engaged himself to Abraham Clemens, where he remained for two years. During 1822 he worked for George Reiff of Skippack Township at eighty dollars per year. He then spent one year working amongst various farmers. On November 18th, 1823, he was married to Jane, daughter of Alexander Dunbar. She was raised by Jacob Merkley, who resided on the Perkiomen Creek, Shippack Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. In the spring of 1824 he, in company with his wife, moved to Joseph Lowery in Skippack, whose farm he managed for five years. He received one-third of the product of the farm as wages for his labor and management. The annual income thus derived averaged about eighty dollars annually. In 1829 they, with their family of two children, his parents, and two of his brothers and one sister, namely, Joshua and Catherine, moved to Canada and came to what is now Bridgeport. Here he was engaged with Jacob S. Shoemaker, who had come to Canada in 1820. During the fall of 1829 he worked in the sawmills erected the same year. While engaged here he purchased pine logs from Henry Erb who resided on lot number fifty eight, German Co.'s Tract, and had them sawed during the winter and drawn on his farm where he had a small shanty put up. Into this shanty they moved in April, 1830. The year previous he had purchased his farm, being south-west half of lot number nineteen, German Co's Tract, containing two hundred and twenty-four acres. During his first year in this extended farm large clearings were made and a two story dwelling, twenty-four by twenty-eight feet, erected. The log barn was erected the year following. In 1851 he erected the stone dwelling now occupied by his son, Alexander, and in 1842 he put up the large frame barn still standing.

      Bro Shoemaker united with the Mennonite church in his youth and lived an exemplary life, worthy of imitation. In his last years his desire to depart and be with Christ was always strong, and can be truly said that he was homesick for heaven. A year ago he was stricken with illness, and he asked those who visited him not to pray for his recovery, but that if it pleased God, He should take him home. His conversation on temporal affairs was in later years mostly of a period of time from 1815 to 1840. The companions of his early life have all preceded him.
      During the past number of years Bro. Shoemaker has been living with his son, Alexander. His family consisted of ten children, viz, Mary Ann, deceased; David, deceased; Mrs. John Shiedel, Waterloo Township, deceased; Mrs. Henry McKay, Aldborough Township, Elgin County; Geo. D., Woolwich Township; Alexander, on the homestead; Mrs. Joseph B. Snyder, Woolwich Township; Jane, deceased; Mrs. George Israel, near Williamsburg; Jacob, deceased. There are a large number of grandchildren.

      The funeral took place on Saturday afternoon, at one o'clock, from the old homestead, and was very largely attended. Services by Noah Stauffer from Heb. 11: 16, and A. Y. Haist from Job 5: 26 at the C. Eby M. H., Berlin. Interment in the burying ground adjoining.


      Herald of Truth, Vol. XXXIX, No. 7, April 1, 1902, page 109, 110, 111

      _________________________


      Jakob D. Schumacher

      Finally, the last hour has sounded for our dear, old friend, Jakob D. Schumacher. On Wednesday afternoon, he fell gently and quietly asleep, to awake again in a better world. He attained the age of 102 years, 3 months, and 9 days and although he had to keep to his bed for approximately a year because of weakness, he was still in full possession of his mental faculties and could talk about his many experiences with his family and visiting friends; which he was fond of doing. About two weeks ago, he had a stroke, and since then, he was no longer fully conscious.

      The deceased was the eldest son of George Schumacher, and was born November 24, 1799 at his grandfather's place by the old mill on Swamp Creek, Frederick Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. As a youth, he helped his father in his woolen mill with stapling and dying. From his 15th to his 18th year, he worked in the meal and oil-mill, when necessary. At 18 years of age, he apprenticed himself to John Funk, whose residence burned down, whereby he lost everything, except for the clothes on his body. In the autumn of 1818, he worked for a time in a tannery near Pottsgrove.

      In the spring of 1819, he attended school for 6 weeks in Lower Salford Township, Montgomery County. In the summer, he worked for 6 months for David Allenbach in Schippach Township for $12. a month. Then, he attended school in Lower Salford again for 6 weeks. With this, he finished his schooling. In 1820, he came to Abraham Clemens and worked for him for 2 years. In 1822, he worked for George Reiff in Schippach Township for $80. a year and the following year, he worked for various other farmers.

      On November 18, 1823, he married Jane Dunbar, who had been raised by Jakob Merkley, who lived on Perkiomen Creek, Schippach Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. In the spring of 1824, he and his wife moved to Joseph Lowery's in Schippach, whose farm he managed for 5 years. For this, he received one third of the produce as his wages for his labour and administration. His annual income at this place was approximately $80.

      In the year 1829, he moved to Canada with his wife, 2 children, as well as 2 brothers and one sister and settled there where Bridgeport now stands. He worked there for one year for his cousin, Jakob S. Schumacher, who had come to Canada in 1820, in the saw-mill, erected in the same year. During the winter, he purchased tree-trunks from Henry Erb, on Lot 58, German Company Tract, and turned them into lumber for a small house, which he raised the following summer on his 224 acre lot #19, German Company Tract. After he had moved into the house, he set about clearing the forest, and also erected a 2-storey residence. The next year, a barn was built. The stone house now occupied by his son, Alexander, came about in 1851. The large frame barn that still stands on the place was built in 1842. His wife, with whom he had lived in a small frame house, after having passed the place on to his son, Alexander, died August 9, 1880 and since then, he had found his home with his son's family, who had given him the best of care.

      His family consisted of ten children, of whom five are still living, namely: George, living near Elmira; Mrs. Joseph Schneider, Berlin; Mrs. George Israel, Williamsburg; and Mrs. H. McCoy, Bothwell. In addition to these two sons and three daughters, he is survived by 43 grandchildren, 50 great-grandchildren, and 1 great-great-grandchild, namely, Mrs. Wm. Luke, in Bothwell.

      Also, it should be mentioned, that, he often suffered from epilepsy in his younger years, which, however, he later remained free of, after he had earnestly prayed to God and had promised to fast every Good Friday, which vow he had faithfully kept, even in later years, when age weakened him. His burial took place on the previous Saturday at the Mennonite cemetery in the eastern ward, with an exceptionally large number attending. The meeting-house was crammed full. Rev. Noah Stauffer preached in German and Rev. J. Y. Haist, in English. It should also be mentioned that he was one of the few men still living, who had helped with the construction of the meeting-house built in 1834, and the last man whose funeral service was held in it. Yesterday, on Wednesday, the demolition of the building was begun, in order to make room for a new, bigger House of God, to be built in the course of the coming summer.3a

      3aBerliner Journal 13 Mar 1902 pg 4 col 5 Translated by: Patricia J. Kauk for the Kitchener Public Library

      _________________________________________


      100 Years Old

      That which is granted only to relatively few mortals, namely: to attain the age of 100 years, was granted on Friday to Mr. Jakob D. Schumacher, who resides with his son Alexander, about three miles south of Berlin. In celebration of the day, many relatives and friends from near and far had gathered to wish the old gentleman much happiness on his day of celebration. During the day and evening, probably two hundred people carried out this affectionate duty. Fifty to sixty people shared in the noon dinner. His children, and his children's children honoured him with a giant bouquet of 100 white roses, tastefully arranged, as well as a speech wishing him well. There were also other floral offerings received, even one from Rochester, N.Y.

      The old gentleman was happy and well. He is still in possession of his mental faculties, and although he is somewhat hard of hearing and his eyesight is weak, he recognized immediately most of the friends congratulating him. Those whom he did not recognize, he recalled as soon as their names were given. A quartet, consisting of the gentlemen. A.L. Breithaupt, H.S. Hallmann, A.B. Devitt, and J.A. Wiederhold, from Zion Church, came that evening and delighted the celebrants with the performance of several lovely songs.

      Jakob D. Schumacher was born November 24, 1799, as the oldest son of George Schumacher, on his grandfather's farm near the old mill on Swamp Creek in Frederick Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. In his youth, he helped his father with wool-carding and dying wool and yarn. From his 15th to 18th year, he worked in a grinding and oil-mill, and in the wool-season, he helped in his father's business. At 18 years of age, he apprenticed himself to John Funk, whose house burned down, whereby Schumacher lost everything, except for that which he had on his own body. In the autumn of 1818, he worked for a short time in a tannery near Pottsgrove.

      The following spring, he attended the school in Lower Salford Township for six weeks, and in the summer worked for six months for David Allenbach in Schippach Township for $12 a month. From his salary, he gave his parents $50 a year, until he reached his majority. After six months had expired, he again attended school for six weeks and with that, his schooling came to an end. In 1820, he apprenticed himself to Abraham Clemens, as a labourer where he remained for two years. The first year, he earned $80 salary, and in the second year, $72. In 1822, he worked for George Reiff in Schippach Township for $80 a year, and later, earned daily wages from farmers.

      On November 18, 1823 he married Jane Dunbar, daughter of a Scotsman, Alexander Dunbar by name. She had been raised by a German farmer, Jakob Merkley by name, in Schippach Township. In the spring of 1824, he moved to Joseph Lowery's farm in Schippach and worked on it for five years. As pay for his work, he received one third of the harvest. His annual income amounted to approximately $80.

      In 1829, he came to Canada with his wife, and two children as well as two brothers and a sister and settled on the spot where Bridgeport now stands. He worked on the very spot where the sawmill of his cousin, Jakob S. Schumacher, had been constructed. The latter had arrived in 1820. He purchased several pine logs from Henry Erb, who lived on Lot Number 58, German Company Tract, and had them sawed up into boards. On the south-west half of Lot Number 10, German Company Tract, which contained 224 acres, which he had purchased in the meantime, he built a shack into which he moved in April 1830. In the first year, a considerable section of the forest was cleared and a two-storey log house was built. A log barn was built the following year. The large barn which now stands on the spot was erected in 1842 and the stone house in 1851.

      When he passed the farm on to his son Alexander, he had a frame house built for himself and his wife. Since the death of his wife approximately 19 years ago, he has lived with his son Alexander, where he receives the best of care. Several years after he had settled down in the forest, he developed epilepsy, which occurred so often that he could not be left alone. For about fifty years, he has been free of this torment. He attributes this to the vow he made then, not to eat anything on Good Friday, which he has conscientiously held to ever since.
      His descendants consist of two sons and three daughters, 38 grand-children and 42 great-grandchildren, who all are lovingly devoted to the "old Gross Dady" and wish him a good and peaceful old-age, in which the "Journal" also joins in.4a

      4aBerliner Journal, Nov. 30, 1899, Page 4, Col. 5 - translated by Patricia Kauk for the Kitchener Public Library

  • Sources 
    1. [S3] Book - Vol I A Biographical History of Waterloo Township and other townships of the county : being a history of the early settlers and their descendants, mostly all of Pennsylvania Dutch origin..., 323.

    2. [S10] Book - Vol II A Biographical History of Waterloo Township and other townships of the county : being a history of the early settlers and their descendants, mostly all of Pennsylvania Dutch origin..., 455.

    3. [S132] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo North - 1901, Waterloo C-5 Page 14.

    4. [S8] News - Gospel Herald, Obituary of Jacob D. Shoemaker - April 1, 1902.

    5. [S132] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo North - 1901, Waterloo C-5 Page 14.
      birthdate given as 20 Nov 1799 Eby states 24 Nov 1799

    6. [S47] Cemetery - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - First Mennonite CC#4507 Internet link First Mennonite Cemetery online.
      In memory of / Jane / Dunbar / died / Aug.9, 1880 / aged 82 yrs. 6 mo. / & 1 day / in memory of / Jacob D. Shoemarker / died / Mar.5,1902 / aged 102 yrs. 3 ms / & 11 days / Blessed are the dead which die / in the Lord / Schaefer, Waterloo

    7. [S131] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo Twp. - 1851, Div 4 Pg 30.
      Jacob D. SHOEMAKER Farmer Birthplace: USA Age 53 Mennonite b. 24-Nov
      Jane SHOEMAKER Birthplace: USA Age 54 Mennonite b. 8-Feb
      George SHOEMAKER Labourer Birthplace: Canada Age 18 Mennonite b. 11-Feb
      Alexander SHOEMAKER Labourer Birthplace: Canada Age 16 Mennonite b. 21-Feb
      Marian SHOEMAKER Birthplace: USA Age 28 Mennonite b. 7-Feb
      Elisabetha SHOEMAKER Birthplace: USA Age 24 Mennonite b. 12-Oct
      Martha SHOEMAKER Birthplace: Canada Age 21 Mennonite b. 9-Jun
      Naomi SHOEMAKER Birthplace: Canada Age 14 Mennonite b. 2-Jun
      Jane SHOEMAKER Birthplace: Canada Age 12 Mennonite b. 30-Dec
      Magdalena SHOEMAKER Birthplace: Canada Age 8 Mennonite b. 16-Jan
      George SHOEMAKER Gentleman Birthplace: USA Age 75 Mennonite

    8. [S168] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo North - 1871, Div. 1, Pg. 21.

    9. [S224] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo North - 1881, Div 3 Page 19.

    10. [S7] News - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Berliner Journal (1859-1917), Obituary of Jakob D. Schumacher.

    11. [S1943] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo North - 1861, Div. 11 Page 83.

    12. [S1322] Land - Founding Families of Waterloo Township 1800-1830, 51.

    13. [S7] News - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Berliner Journal (1859-1917), 12 Aug 1880.
      Aug. 9, 1880 Jane Schumacher, née Dunbar, wife of Jakob D. Schumacher, at age of 82 years, 6 months, and 2 days

    14. [S131] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo Twp. - 1851, Div 4 Pg 30.

    15. [S1943] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo North - 1861, Div. 11 Page 84.

    16. [S10] Book - Vol II A Biographical History of Waterloo Township and other townships of the county : being a history of the early settlers and their descendants, mostly all of Pennsylvania Dutch origin..., 454.

    17. [S10] Book - Vol II A Biographical History of Waterloo Township and other townships of the county : being a history of the early settlers and their descendants, mostly all of Pennsylvania Dutch origin..., 456.

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsHonoured - Lakeside Park in Kitchener was once part of his property. The Lake is called Shoemaker Lake - - Lakeside Park, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsRetired - 1801 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 18 Nov 1823 - , , Pennsylvania, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsImmigration - 1829 - , Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - farmer - 1852 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Farmer - 1861 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsReligion - Mennonite - 1861 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Gentleman - 1871 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Farmer - 1881 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsReligion - Mennonite - 1881 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - - 38 Shirk Place, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Cause: Old Age - 12 Mar 1902 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - First Mennonite Cemetery, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth