Waterloo Region Generations
A record of the people of Waterloo Region, Ontario.
Heinrich Baer "Henry" Bauman

Heinrich Baer "Henry" Bauman[1, 2]

Male 1805 - 1874  (68 years)

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  • Name Heinrich Baer "Henry" Bauman 
    Born 10 Oct 1805  Alleghany Valley, Berks Co., Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 4, 5, 6, 7
    Gender Male 
    Business Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Bowman and Heins 
    Land Bef 1831  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    Name Henry B. Bauman 
    Name Henry Baer Bowman 
    Name Henry Bowman 
    Residence 1831  Waterloo Township - Beasley's Broken Front Lot 05, Waterloo County, Ontario Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Occupation 1840  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    merchant 
    Occupation 1842  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    storekeeper 
    Occupation 1852  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [10
    merchant 
    Occupation 1861  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Produce Merchant 
    Residence 1861  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Mennonite 
    Eby ID Number 00002-562 
    Died 16 Aug 1874  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 6
    Buried First Mennonite Cemetery, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [11
    Person ID I6800  Generations
    Last Modified 16 Oct 2021 

    Father Martin Bauman,   b. 3 Oct 1768, Of, Berks Co., Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Feb 1813, Alleghany Valley, Berks Co., Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 44 years) 
    Mother Magdalena Baer,   b. CALC 18 Sep 1775, , Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Sep 1851, , Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 75 years) 
    Family ID F2069  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Judith W. Bauman,   b. 31 Mar 1808, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Nov 1866, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 58 years) 
    Married 3 Sep 1828  [3
    Children 
     1. Warden Israel David Bowman,   b. 28 Mar 1830, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Sep 1896, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)
     2. Veronica "Frances" Bauman,   b. 12 Mar 1832, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Sep 1904, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years)
     3. Magdalena "Lena" Bauman,   b. 5 Sep 1834, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     4. Samuel Bauman,   b. 1 Feb 1836, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Oct 1840, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 4 years)
     5. Gideon Bauman,   b. 17 Jun 1838, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Oct 1840, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 2 years)
     6. Bauman,   b. 17 May 1840, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     7. Johannes "John" Bauman,   b. 4 Oct 1840, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Aug 1841, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 0 years)
     8. William Henry Bowman,   b. 23 Sep 1842, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 May 1896, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 53 years)
     9. Joseph W. Bauman,   b. 29 Oct 1846, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     10. Alexander Bauman,   b. 8 Mar 1849, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Jun 1854  (Age 5 years)
    Last Modified 16 Oct 2021 
    Family ID F2047  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Henry B. Bauman
    Henry B. Bauman
    original at Waterloo Region Museum

  • Notes 
    • Henry B. Baumann, "son of Martin and Magdalena (Baer) Baumann, was born in Berks County, Pennsylvania, October 10th, 1805, and came to Waterloo County with his mother when a young man. She resided at Bloomingdale. On September 3rd, 1828, he was married to Judith, daughter of Christian and Magdalena (Weber) Baumann. She was born in Waterloo County, April 1st, 1808, and died November 1st, 1866. He died August 16th, 1874. They resided in the town of Berlin where they both died. Mr. Bowman in company with John Hoffman, opened the second store in the town of Berlin. This was in 1837. They had a family of eight children, of whom three died young."

      Eby, Ezra E. (1895). A biographical history of Waterloo township and other townships of the county: being a history of the early settlers and their descendants, mostly all of Pennsylvania Dutch origin: as also much other unpublished historical information chiefly of a local character. Berlin [Kitchener, Ont.]: [s.n.].

      ________________________

      King Street, Kitchener

      Benton to Eby Street.-Successive occupation was as follows: From Benton Street easterward, before 1855, a one-story brick building with gable facing King Street was erected at the corner and used by Jacob Benner as blacksmith shop. Later Benner moved to West Montrose and the next occupant was Valentine Gildner and after him his son John Gildner . This blacksmith shop continued until comparatively recent years. A frame building painted white, with veranda in front, was Gildner s residence..

      Vacant lot.

      A tinsmith shop owned by Mr. Lehnen . This had a nice front with two good-sized glass windows on either side of the door.

      A dwelling house built by Henry Rothaermel 1848-9. He was a carpenter and later was market clerk and tax collector.

      A lane.

      A one and one-half story building, with gable facing King Street and a verandah extending over the sidewalk, occupied by a Mr. Coleman 1855-1860. Adjoining it was a warehouse. The store passed to Coleman's son and then to John Kegel. Later John George Schmidt, shoemaker, occupied the building.

      A lane.

      A double, frame building about 50 feet along King St.; the east half used as a dwelling had a veranda; the west half was occupied by Charles Koehn, shoemaker.

      Open space.

      Dwelling of Gabriel Bowman, carpenter, who built the house.

      A one and one-half story building occupied by Balzar Allendorf, a coverlet weaver, about 1840. Allendorf later moved to New Hamburg. There was a veranda at the front of the house and under it a well. Cattle ran at large in the streets at this time and one Sunday afternoon a steer got on the veranda floor, which was partly rotted, broke through, fell into the well and had to be pulled out by means of a windlass. The building was torn down later.

      frame building ocupied by Henry Sippel, former employee of Allendorf, as a weaver's shop.

      In 1855 there was a frame building one and one-half story high along King Street divided into two parts, one part a dwelling and the other part a hat shop, owned by John Kidder, who made felt hats and old-fashioned bonnets. The shop was a few steps above the sidewalk level.

      A dwelling.

      A one and one-half story frame building lengthwise with King street occupied by a widow, Mrs. Caroline Lehnen.

      A driveway.

      A two story brick building with gable toward King Street, occupied by J. J. Lehnen, son of the widow Lehnen, as a copper and tinsmith shop and a store. Lehnen made his own tinware. Later Jacob Doebler occupied this building as a bakery.

      A one and one-half story frame building with gable toward King Street occupied by George Yantz, a cabinet maker. He had a tavern in this same building for a time, and lived there.

      In the early years a garden.

      A small shop with sloping roof used by Christian Enslin as a book store and book-bindery, the first book-bindery in Berlin Enslm arrived in Berlin about 1830. Jacob Stroh remembers going with his father to the store to buy school supplies. Enslin later was editor, for Henry Eby, the publisher, of the Deutsche Canadier which began publication in 1840.

      Enslin's House, one-half story, frame, standing lengthwise with King Street and having a veranda over the door, was on the site of Dr. Hetts present office and house. At the rear there was an orchard.

      About 60 feet back of King Street there was a house built by Henry Eby. Shubel Randall, brother of George Randall, lived in it later. In 1860 the building was destroyed by fire and a servant girl Dina Hertz, perished in the flames. The walls remaining standing, the house was re-built, and is still in use.

      A brick building, abutting on King Street with gable facing the street, was Henry Eby's printing office. The main floor was she or seven feet above the sidewalk level. In 1860 this building was changed to a church and was the first Anglican Church in Berlin.

      A frame building, one end of which was used by Henry Bowman as a general store; he lived in the other end. This was known as the Bowman building. Later William Stein had a tailor shop in it and after him William Thoms used it as a shoe repair shop.

      REMINISCENCES OF BERLIN (NOW KITCHENER) By JACOB STROH Contributed by Joseph M. Snyder.

      Part I. Settlement - Early Villagers and Buildings, Waterloo Historical Society Annual Volume 1930

      ____________________

      King Street , North Side

      Foundry Street (now Ontario Street).

      Jacob and John Hoffman, brothers, who came from Pennsylvania, erected a furniture factory on the corner about 1840. It was a two story frame building extending along King St., had 25 to 30 employees and a 15 h.p. engine brought from Buffalo.

      Eby's history gives John Hoffman as having come from Pennsylvania in 1825; Jacob, almost two years older, seems to have come before. They both worked at carpentry, etc., for a number of years before starting the factory in which enterprise they were assisted by Benjamin Eby. On the ridge of the factory roof there was a belfry with the only larger bell in Berlin. This bell served not only the factory but the village as well, pinging at 7 in the morning, at 12, at 1 and at 6 o'clock in the evening. It was used also as a fire bell and was tolled for funerals.

      By some prank or spite the bell was stolen in 1850 before there was a night watchman at the factory, and disappeared for two or three years. Eventually it was found in a well at the comer of Duke and College Streets, put back in place on the Hoffman factory and later was taken to a belfry on the Simpson factory spoken of, where it was used until this factory was discontinued. It was then taken to the pavilion in Victoria Park and was melted down when the pavilion was destroyed by fire.

      Behind the Hoffman factory there was a pond, about three feet deep, fed by a spring, the water being used for the factory boiler, etc. About 1860 a frame building, used by the firm for a warehouse, covered the site of the spring. Further back there was a saw mill, also a planing mill, the first of its kind in Berlin. A two story frame building extending along Foundry Street was later added to the factory and used as a turning shop. At the rear of this building was the factory boiler house.

      Next to the factory on King Street there was a three story brick building. The ground floor was used as a store, called the Berlin Warehouse. Jacob Hoffman, who by this time was alone in the business, John having gone to Waterloo, announced himself as dealer in dry goods, groceries, hardware, china, glassware, crockery, and paint and oils and manufacturer of all kinds of furniture, also sash doors, etc., selling low for cash. An overhead passage way on a bridge connected the second stories of the factory and brick building. Over the store was the paint shop and in the rear a warehouse. Hoffman's store was later occupied by William Schmidt, son of Rev. Wm. Schmidt, an early minister of the Evangelical Church. Schmidt had a dry goods store only, known as the Golden Lion store because of a large gilt lion over the entrance. Isaac Hoffman, son of Jacob, carried on the factory and store for several years; later John S. Anthes was in possession while Hoffman went to Waterloo and continued the furniture business there with Adam Klippert and Martin Wegenast as partners. Jacob and John Hoffman erected a number of houses in Berlin.

      Jacob Hoffman was very stout, weighing over 300 pounds. He was a member of the Evangelical Church. For a time he served on the village council. He resided on Foundry Street in the rear of the Canadian Block in a square, hip roof, two story, frame house, until it was destroyed by fire, when he moved to the west side of Foundry Street, south, where now is the Robe & Clothing Co. building. Here he had a one and one-half story frame house with a large two story addition at the rear where were lodged apprentices and other factory employees. There was a small portico over the front door and a porch extending along the northerly side of the house.

      Next to the Hoffman warehouse there was a saloon and restaurant occupied by a Mr. Unger. He served, among other things, oysters which came in small wooden, 1-gal. kegs. Adjoining Hoffman's store there was the tailor shop of H. J. Nahrgang, later occupied by Henry Glebe, an early band master; next a store differently occupied at various times and next the shoe store of Wm. Niehaus. A three story brick building occupied by Wm. Young as a grocery. Mr. Young eventually went to the Canadian Block and the store was used for various purposes, among them auction sales in the evening. Here there was sold the first white crockery offered in Berlin. Later the building was occupied by the Berliner Journal.

      A one and one-half story frame building with gable toward King St. and a veranda, occupied by Mr. Fuchs, a tailor and shoemaker, whose wife assisted her husband as expert in repairing clocks. The family lived in the building. About 1865 the frame building was moved to the rear and Fuchs' block erected on the street. The ground floor had three stores, the west one occupied by Mr. Fuchs, the middle by John Kayser, dry goods merchant, and the third one by Tindall Simpson and Sons, shoemakers and tailors. The first building on part of the Fuchs' block site was a rough frame structure used by one Susand, colored, who was the first barber in Berlin.

      A two story brick building with gable facing King Street, occupied by Christian Garman, harness maker, who later moved to New Hamburg and started a tannery. This building was later occupied by Levi Gaukel, son of Frederick Gaukel, after his father's death. He had a small hotel known as The Red Lion. In 1860 Urban Prinzer succeeded Gaukel and continued the hotel for a short time.

      A two and one-half story brick building with gable facing King St. was occupied by Levi Gaukel, as a butcher shop after he gave up the hotel next door. Jacob Gaukel was associated with Levi. Later George Debus occupied this shop.

      A building with gable and porch facing King Street, later occupied by George DeBus as a barber shop.

      On the corner of King and Queen Streets there was first a driving shed for the Gaukel hotel opposite, until the Bowman block was erected in 1860. This was a three story brick building lengthwise with King Street. Joseph Bowman the noted violinist occupied the third floor of this building. Half of the ground floor of the building was occupied by Henry B. Bowman with a partner Heins as general dry goods store. This was on the corner. The other half was a brick store occupied by Cole and Graf, druggists, and later by Wm. Bowman in the same business. On the site of the Bowman block is the handsome Bank building built by the Merchants Bank and now occupied by the Bank of Montreal.


      REMINISCENCES OF BERLIN (NOW KITCHENER) By JACOB STROH Contributed by Joseph M. Snyder.

      Part I. Settlement - Early Villagers and Buildings, Waterloo Historical Society Annual Volume 1930

      _________________________

      Queen Street North, West Side

      Gaukel's well at the corner of the hotel shed, the corner being later built up as the Bowman Block, now the Bank of Montreal.

      A brick warehouse belonging to the corner store of the Bowman Block. First occupants of this store were Bowman and Heins, later H. S, Huber and then by Huber and Roy.

      Opposite the Breithaupt leather store stood a one-story brick building, Dr. Pipe's surgery and later Dr. Wright's.

      A two-storey brick house lengthwise with Queen Street and with veranda on two sides, the veranda a few steps above the ground, occupied by Henry Schaefer. In 1871 Dr. Pipe lived in this house. Among other things Dr. Pipe kept bees, although he was quite afraid of them. Dr. Pipe and Henry Stroh succeeded in bringing the first Italian queen bee to this part of the country.

      A lane.

      A handsome brick house, gable roof, lengthwise with the street, the corners faced with limestone from Guelph, erected by Joseph Hobson, the surveyer, in 1860. Hobson eventually was Chief Engineer of the Great Western Railway and when that was merged with the Grand Trunk he became Chief Engineer of the latter Company and was among other things Chief Engineer of the Sarnia tunnel. Alexander MacPherson, editor and publisher of the Berlin Telegraph, later lived in the house. The site is now occupied by the head office of the Economical Fire Insurance Company.

      A two-story red frame building well back from the street built probably before 1850 by Peter Eby, identified with the "Deutsche Canadier" and with the early days of the "Telegraph". Dr. Eggert, homeopath, lived in the house 1859-1860 and later John Klippert, high constable and county bailiff.

      One and a half story brick building at the corner of Duke and Queen Streets occupied by a Mr. Von Ebenau and wife and later for a number of years by Michael Jaehle, a blacksmith. The site is now occupied by the Daily Record building.

      Duke Street.

      A large handsome building trimmed with cut stone built in 1860 by David S. Shoemaker of Bridgeport who was county registrar, The building was intended for a bank and agent's residence and so used first by the Commercial Bank which failed and later by the Merchants Bank of which R. N, Rogers was agent for a number of years. Some time later Dr. H. S. Lackner acquired the property and used it as residence and surgery. After Dr. Lackner's death the property was sold to the present occupants, the Langleys of Toronto.
      building, colonial style, with large posts at the front carrying the projecting roof, erected in 1848-49, the Waterloo Township Hall, the land for which was donated by Frederick Gaukel. General public meetings were held in this hall, among others meetings purposing to have Berlin named as county town. After consummation of this a banquet was held in the hall, which was occasionally used for such purpose. The occasion of this particular banquet was the laying of the corner stone of the new county buildings in 1852. 100 guests were present and there were a number of patriotic toasts. Later the building was used as a printing office, the "Deutsche Canadier" and the "Telegraph" being printed there for a time. Eventually the building was remodelled and enlarged and became the Methodist Church. In 1904 the St. Matthews Lutheran congregation purchased the property and later the First English Lutheran Church, which still continues in the building.

      Behind the present Kitchener Public Library, occupying the site of his ornamental garden, and still standing is Dr. Scott's residence, built in 1855. Henry Rothaermel was the contractor. Dr. Scott was the first warden of the county and first reeve of Berlin. After his death the house was occupied by M. C. Schofield who married Dr. Scott's widow. Later Israel Bowman, for many years county clerk and town clerk of Berlin, acquired the property and lived there.

      Weber Street.

      On the corner the Presbyterian Church first built 1860-61 at a size of 36 ft. by 50 ft., cost $4,500 and seating 175 persons. Rev. John McMeekin was an early minister.

      A two-story red brick building lengthwise with Queen Street, built 1855-56, the house of H. S. Huber.

      Simon Roy's house, also red brick, one and one-half story high, both of these houses were set back from the street. Mr. Roy was nurseryman and florist.

      A one-story double house lengthwise with Queen Street.

      Before Ahrens Street was continued westerly across Queen Street there was on the site a two-story unpainted weather-boarded building, the house of John Dopp.
      frame building, similar to Dopp's, the house of Christina Bloch, a widow who lived there for many years.

      A frame building, similar to Dopp's, but with gable facing Queen Street, the house of August Vetter, painter and paper-hanger.

      A vacant lot later owned by Louis Breithaupt who built, on the corner of Margaret Avenue, a residence for Judge Lacourse.

      Margaret Avenue.

      On Margaret Avenue a short distance westerly from Queen Street was the Moxley farm with house and barn. The barn was later moved to Lexington by Henry Stroh who bought it to replace one that had been struck by lightning. On the corner of Ellen Street a brick house occupied in the early days by Rev. Mr. Savage, Methodist minister, and later by John Hoffman, Jr., a druggist.

      Ellen Street.

      REMINISCENCES OF BERLIN (NOW KITCHENER) By JACOB STROH Contributed by Joseph M. Snyder.

      Part I. Settlement - Early Villagers and Buildings, Waterloo Historical Society Annual Volume 1930

  • Sources 
    1. [S3] Book - Vol I A Biographical History of Waterloo Township and other townships of the county : being a history of the early settlers and their descendants, mostly all of Pennsylvania Dutch origin..., 71.

    2. [S17] News - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Der Morgenstern (1839-1841), Death Notice of Samuel Bauman - 15 Oct 1840.
      Samuel Bauman, son of Heinrich B. Bauman, merchant of this city, died of scarlet fever on Sunday evening at age of 4 years, 8 month and 12 days old (poem follows) (4 Oct 1840)

    3. [S3] Book - Vol I A Biographical History of Waterloo Township and other townships of the county : being a history of the early settlers and their descendants, mostly all of Pennsylvania Dutch origin..., 174.

    4. [S131] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo Twp. - 1851, Div 4 Pg 4.
      Henry B. BOWMAN Merchant USA 47 Mennonite b. 7-Oct
      Judith BOWMAN Canada 44 Mennonite b. 1-Apr
      Israel BOWMAN Store Keeper Canada 22 Mennonite b. 28-Mar
      Veronica BOWMAN Canada 19 Mennonite b. 12-Mar
      Magdelena BOWMAN Canada 18 Mennonite b. 5-Sep
      William BOWMAN Canada 10 Mennonite b. 23-Sep
      Joseph BOWMAN Canada 6 Mennonite b. 29-Sep
      Alexandor BOWMAN Canada 3 Mennonite b. 8-Mar
      Henry F. SCHMUTTER Doctor Germany 55 Lutheran b. 10-Jul

    5. [S123] Census - ON, Waterloo, Berlin - 1861, Div. 2 Page 11.

    6. [S7] News - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Berliner Journal (1859-1917), 20 Aug 1874.
      Died 16 Aug 1874 In Berlin, Heinrich B. Baumann died at the age of 68 years, 10 months, 9 days.

    7. [S229] Census - ON, Waterloo, Berlin - 1871, Sect. 1 Page 5.

    8. [S1322] Land - Founding Families of Waterloo Township 1800-1830, 8.

    9. [S13] Vit - - ON, Waterloo - Wellington District Marriage Register Part 1 1840-1852, Rev'd Frederick W. Bindemann, Minister of The German Evangelical Protestant Lutheran Church At Greenbush, Waterloo Township, Halton County, Wellington District, 31 Aug. 1842 to 31 Aug. 1843 report 25.
      Yost Stengel, Cooper, to Allen Averill both of Waterloo. Wit. John Roth, Saddler and Henry Bowman, Storekeeper, both of Waterloo

    10. [S131] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo Twp. - 1851, Div 4 Pg 4.

    11. [S47] Cemetery - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - First Mennonite CC#4507 Internet link First Mennonite Cemetery online.

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 10 Oct 1805 - Alleghany Valley, Berks Co., Pennsylvania Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBusiness - Bowman and Heins - - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsLand - Bef 1831 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1831 - Waterloo Township - Beasley's Broken Front Lot 05, Waterloo County, Ontario Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - merchant - 1840 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - storekeeper - 1842 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - merchant - 1852 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Produce Merchant - 1861 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - Mennonite - 1861 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 16 Aug 1874 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - First Mennonite Cemetery, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth