Waterloo Region Generations
A record of the people of Waterloo Region, Ontario.
Reeve Henry Sauder Huber

Reeve Henry Sauder Huber[1]

Male 1819 - 1872  (53 years)

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  • Photos
    Henry Sauder Huber
    Henry Sauder Huber
    From Berlin Today 1806-1906 official souvenir located at the Kitchener Public Library
    Henry Sauder Huber
    Henry Sauder Huber
    From Berlin Today 1806-1906 official souvenir located at the Kitchener Public Library
    H. S. Huber
    H. S. Huber
    From: Official souvenir of the celebration of cityhood, July 17th 1912
    Henry Sauder Huber
    Henry Sauder Huber
    From: Official souvenir of the celebration of cityhood, July 17th 1912

  • Name Henry Sauder Huber 
    Prefix Reeve 
    Born 18 Jun 1819  , Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
    Residence 1841  North Dumfries Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [11
    Occupation 1851  Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [12
    merchant 
    Elected Office 1855  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    councillor - warden 
    • Years Served: 1857 (Warden), 1858, 1859-1862 (Warden), 1863-64 (Warden)
    Christened 1856  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [13
    Gender Male 
    Business Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Huber and Ahrens 
    Elected Office 1857  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Reeve of Berlin 
    Elected Office 1859  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Reeve of Berlin 
    Occupation 1861  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    Merchant 
    Residence 1861  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    [Member of New Jersulem Religion] 
    Elected Office 1862  , Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Warden for the County of Waterloo 
    Interesting business, story, politics 
    Name H. S. Huber 
    Name Heinrich S. Huber  [4
    Name Henry S. Huber 
    Occupation 1871  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Gentleman 
    Residence 1872  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    • New Jerusalem Church
    Eby ID Number 00060-3977 
    Died 3 Sep 1872  Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [5, 6, 8, 10, 14, 15
    Cause: general debility (4 years) 
    Buried Mount Hope Cemetery, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Person ID I9650  Generations
    Last Modified 6 Apr 2024 

    Father Peter Huber,   b. 28 Jan 1784, Warwick Twp., Lancaster Co., Pennsylvania Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Aug 1851, Blenheim Twp., Oxford Co., Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 67 years) 
    Mother Veronica Souder,   b. 12 Nov 1784, , Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Dec 1852, Blenheim Twp., Oxford Co., Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years) 
    Married 20 Oct 1807  [16
    Family ID F239  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Barbara Shoemaker,   b. 8 Mar 1824, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Aug 1907, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 83 years) 
    Married 8 Jul 1841  Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 11, 17
    Children 
     1. Isaac Huber,   b. 7 Jun 1842, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Jul 1918, Bracebridge, Macaulay Twp., Muskoka District Municipality, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years)
     2. Celinda Ann Huber,   b. 11 Oct 1844, Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Feb 1902, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 57 years)
     3. Mayor Allen H. Huber,   b. 27 Jan 1847, Bridgeport (Kitchener), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Oct 1915, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years)
     4. Charles Huber,   b. 7 Jul 1850, Bridgeport (Kitchener), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Aug 1925, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years)
     5. Emma Huber,   b. 1851, , Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     6. Elmina Huber,   b. 1852, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown
     7. Edwin S. Huber,   b. Jan 1863, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Apr 1936, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 73 years)
    Last Modified 7 Apr 2024 
    Family ID F1500  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Henry Huber, "was born June 18th, 1819. He resided in the town of Berlin where he was engaged in the mercantile business which calling he chose when a young man and through his great perseverance, enterprise and ability worked up one of the largest and best paying businesses in general merchandise in the county. Mr. Huber always took a deep interest in whatever was for the welfare of the town and his name is identified with that of many good works. He was courteous and gentlemanly in bearing and highly respected by all who knew him. He died September 3rd, 1872. On July 8th, 1841, he was married to Barbara Shoemaker who was born March 8th, 1824. They resided in Berlin, on north side of Queen Street where the widow still resides. To them was born a family of six children."

      Eby, Ezra E. (1895). A biographical history of Waterloo township and other townships of the county: being a history of the early settlers and their descendants, mostly all of Pennsylvania Dutch origin: as also much other unpublished historical information chiefly of a local character. Berlin [Kitchener, Ont.]: [s.n.].
      ______________________________________

      H. S. Huber, Reeve 1857 and 1859 to 1864.

      Mr. Henry S. Huber was the son of a pioneer from Pennsylvania, and born in Lancaster, Bridgeport County, Penn., he became the leading Berlin merchant of his day. He was enterprising and esteemed for his good qualities. It is said of him that he was always ready to encourage industry and new business in the village of Berlin. That he was a man of parts is evidenced by his having been elected reeve of Berlin in 1857 and again in 1859, holding office continuously until 1865. In the securing of the county seat, and a railway for Berlin, he was particularly active. His tenure of office was marked by progressiveness.

      Official souvenir of the celebration of cityhood, July 17th 1912, Berlin, Ontario, The German Printing and Publishing Co
      _________________________

      Henry S. and Allan Huber This is another of the father/son combinations in this community who were reeves or mayors. The father, Henry S. was reeve of the Village of Berlin in 1857 and 1859-1864. He also was well known for helping runaway slaves from the United States. His son, Allan, was mayor of the Town of Berlin in 1908 and was a native of Bridgeport. Henry S. Huber died in 1872.

      _____________________________

      King Street, Kitchener

      Next easterly were the foundry buildings of Huber & Ahrens, operated from 1840 to 1853. There were four separate buildings, 30 or 40 feet back from the King Street line. In the moulding shop, Mr. Stroh remembers seeing the glittering metal run out from the cupola, at casting time, when he was a boy. The woodworking and power building was a two-storey brick structure with a smoke stack about 50 feet high. The second floor of the building was used for painting and finishing. On the Foundry Street side there was an outside stairway and incline to let down finished machinery. A third building was used for making agricultural machines, threshing cylinders and ploughs. Separators were not made at that time. Near Foundry Street there was a two-storey building with gable toward King Street, used also for woodworking and for the office. In this building three pianos, the first to be made in Berlin, were turned out in 1852. These were upright pianos, hand-made all except the keyboard. The artisan was J. Maas and he made the pianos, one for Charles Ahrens, one for Henry S. Huber and one for Charles Hendry of Conestoga. This latter building was later moved alongside of Winger's pump shop and used as a cigar factory for a time; eventually it was converted into a dwelling. The moulding shop of the foundry was later used as an ashery. After Mr. Ahrens died m 1853 the foundry buildings were sold by auction to Sheriff Davidson who owned them for a number of years.

      REMINISCENCES OF BERLIN (NOW KITCHENER) By JACOB STROH Contributed by Joseph M. Snyder.

      Part I. Settlement - Early Villagers and Buildings, Waterloo Historical Society Annual Volume 1930

      _______________________________________

      King Street , North Side

      From Francis to Water Street.

      he ground was used by H. F. J. Jackson for stabling, etc., on his contract for building the Grand Trunk Railway through a large part of Waterloo County. Later he built his residence on this plot.

      The plot east of Water Street was used as a drill ground by the Berlin Volunteer Company of the Waterloo Battalion, 1864-67. They mostly drilled in the evenings and had some quite young volunteers, Jacob Stroh, 16 years, one of them. The trustees of the New Jerusalem Church bought the corner in 1869 and in 1870 erected the present Church. This had the first pipe organ in Berlin, built by Claus Maas of Preston.

      Haller's hat and felt-working shop. He made the first felt boots and shoes, worn largely by the farmers, in winter, in this vicinity.

      Open space up to Henry Brickner's house.

      A frame building one and one-half story high and located a little back of the street. Later a brick building was erected on the open space. At the westerly corner of Young Street Mr. Bricker built a cooperage in 1860.

      At the easterly corner of Young and King Streets was Wendell Brunner's blacksmith shop, a rough frame building. Behind it, on Young Street, was another frame building used as a waggon shop by Christian Huinbrecht.

      Vacant place and next a three story brick building, lengthwise with King Street, divided into two parts, used as stores for a short time. Later it was a paint shop and still later a warehouse for the Simpson factory across the road. The third floor of this building was the first habitat of the Berlin Militia, organized in 1864 at the time of the American Civil War. Colonel Pickering was the first drill master. He was sent from England to drill the Canadian Militia. The local company had at first no rifles and had to use Wooden substitutes for their drills.

      A three story brick building erected by C. Schneucker and used as a hotel. The third floor was a large hall used for a number of years, for balls and concerts. Paul Schmidt moved into the building in 1860. It was then called the Schneucker and Schmidt Hotel. A later landlord was Mr. Zinger and the name was changed to The North American Hotel. Toward the rear and just east of the Hotel was a barn and horse shed, with wide approach from King Street.

      A one and one-half story frame house 15 or 20 feet back from the street line with gable and veranda facing King Street, occupied by Paul Schmidt and later by his widow.

      A very early building one and one-half story, rough cast; the dwelling of Sam Trout, a blacksmith. A later occupant was James Godbold, son of Godbold who lived on the corner of Wellington and King Streets. Jacob, son of James, brakeman on the Grand Trunk, was killed while on top of a freight car in St. Mary's, the train passing under a low bridge which Godbold did not see as he was looking at a circus beside the track.

      A tailor shop was also in this building which stood originally at the corner of Foundry and King Streets.

      A two story brick building with gable toward King Street and occupied by Henry Gauntley. On the second floor there was a paint shop and at the rear a wagon shop.

      A brick building, the blacksmith shop, for many years, of Sam Trout.

      A vacant lot.

      At the Foundry St. corner a frame building, Reinhold Lang's tannery with his house, alongside, one and one-half story with frame porch. Later Mr. Lang moved his business to Charles Street, the site of the present Lang Tanning Co. plant. Jacob Y. Shantz erected the Canadian Block, three story brick, corner of King and Foundry Streets, in 1856. The front was set back from the street line and had a verandah extending to the edge of the sidewalk. There were three stores, the corner, Cole and Graf, druggists; then Wm. Young, groceries and liquors; and next H. S. Huber, general store. The old blacksmith shop was used as a warehouse by Huber.

      The Canadian Block while still fairly new, burned down about 1862 in the Spring. The fire started in the corner drug store, during the night. The walls remained standing after the fire was out but were considered dangerous and were pulled down by the firemen. One wall, in this operation, fell on H. S. Huber's warehouse, which had not been burned and in which he had large quantities of supplies. The firemen were blamed for not having notified Huber so that he could have removed his goods before the wall was thrown over.


      REMINISCENCES OF BERLIN (NOW KITCHENER) By JACOB STROH Contributed by Joseph M. Snyder.

      Part I. Settlement - Early Villagers and Buildings, Waterloo Historical Society Annual Volume 1930

      _______________

      King Street , North Side

      Queen St. North.

      On the corner there was a frame building lengthwise with King Street, occupied by J. U. Tyson, dealer in groceries, wines, liquors and meats, erected about 1833. In 1841 Sheriff George Davidson bought this building and in it opened the first Post Office in 1842. His brother William was associated with him. Probably during 1845 Doering & Ahrens occupied the premises as a general store. A little later the firm was Huber & Ahrens. Mr. Huber acted as magistrate for a number of years, in which occupation he was popular and had much to do, people coming from small surrounding villages to Mr. Huber for fair trial. He was the second reeve in Berlin.

      Next came a barber shop occupied by George A. Fischer who also served as dentist and as fruit dealer.

      A house erected by C. A. Ahrens of Huber and Ahrens. Mr. Ahrens had a brick vault at the back of his kitchen, lined with an iron chest and considered fire proof. He was the first treasurer of Waterloo County and had this vault for safe keeping of his books and papers. The house was later occupied by Dr. Mylius.

      Louis Breithaupt, who came from Buffalo in 1861 after having started his tanning business in Berlin in 1857, previously bought the corner of King and Queen Streets, and erected there the first section of the American Block in 1862.

      Next to the Dr. Mylius house there was a two story brick building erected about 1855. It was occupied by Baedeker and Steubing who had a considerable business as book sellers and stationers, also as dealers in wallpaper, etc., besides doing some publishing. This business, moved later to the corner of King and Frederick Streets, continued until Mr. Steubing's death.

      In his younger years Mr. Baedeker was a carpenter and had cut his knee with an adze, necessitating amputation and substitution of a cork leg.

      On the site of the present Steel's store, George Davidson, later sheriff, erected a building in 1845 and moved the Post Office there when Doering and Ahrens occupied the corner store. Mr. Davidson also had a general store in this new building. About 1855 Kranz & Stroh occupied the building as a general store.

      Next came a building occupied at first by George Klein and later the site of Henry Knell's jewelery shop.

      John Winger's pump shop. Wooden pipe called pump logs were of about ten-inch timber, tamarack or pine logs with a bore of about 3". The pumps were mostly finished square and surmounted with turned tops.

      A two story frame building painted white. John Winger's house. Eby's history mentions John Winger as having come from Pennsylvania in 1836.

      A ten-foot lane leading back to the Public School grounds and into Winger's yard. The highest ground in this vicinity was in Winger's yard. Children were in the habit of sliding down the hill in winter to King Street. In 1840 Mr. Bentler erected a building and occupied the second floor as dwelling and shoe shop. Martin Messner had a music store on the ground floor which was a few steps above the street level. In 1855-6 Andrew Nicolaus took over the Winger house and changed it to a hotel. The first considerable street grading operation in Berlin was the lowering of the corner of King and Frederick and vicinity 8 to 10 feet. This put the St. Nicholas Hotel, as it was called, under the necessity of being extended downward one story and this lower part became the hotel office and bar room. At the westerly end of the hotel there was a shed and stable for horses. Over the shed, approached by a stairway, there was a hall known as St. Nicholas Hall used for concerts, balls and entertainments generally. At the rear of the adjoining St. Nicholas Hall there was a building on the high ground known as the Turner Hall and used as German Turnverein.

      REMINISCENCES OF BERLIN (NOW KITCHENER) By JACOB STROH Contributed by Joseph M. Snyder.

      Part I. Settlement - Early Villagers and Buildings, Waterloo Historical Society Annual Volume 1930

      ___________________

      Among the early settlers of Berlin were August Fuchs, a jeweller, from Baden ; George Jantz, a grocer and tavern keeper, also from Baden ; Anselm Wagner, a potter from Alsace


      Theobald Spetz, The Catholic Church in Waterloo County Book I

      ______________________

      Anselm Wagner was the first potter in Berlin and had a shop for many years on King street south.

      _________________

      How More German Families Were Brought In

      At that stage there was a further influx of German hand-workers. In the main they came from Hesse, with sprinklings from Baden, Saxony. Mecklenburg, and other States. Woodworkers predominated. The Dorf however boasted a weaver, wagonmaker, hatmaker. a tailor (John Nahrgang), two shoemakers, and several carpenters, while Anselm Wagner, potter, made shilling crocks and flowerpots for the Hausfrau. A Dr. Klinkert was the first doctor

      A History of Kitchener

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      King Street , North Side

      Frederick Street.

      Bishop Benjamin Eby's farm came to the corner of King and Frederick Streets. Next to Frederick Street, Frederick and William Miller erected a frame building and used it as a general store. After the grading operations spoken of this building had to undergo the same process as the St. Nicholas Hotel. It was considered a fine building in its day with large windows on each side of the centre door. Henry Stroh finally bought the building and tore it down in 1868. Jacob Stroh has some of the window sash, shutters, stairway, etc., still in his possession. Later the building was occupied by Jacob Eckstein cigar maker and tobacco dealer. Mrs. Warren with a family lived on the second story for a number of years.

      Vacant lot. Next a large brick building with double deck porch along the front, the Queen's Arms Hotel, built about 1840 and continued as a hotel until about 1860. A Mr. Butchard was the first landlord and later Levi Weber. From this hotel the first omnibus met the trains at the G.T.R. station in Berlin in 1856. Before that day it was a stopping place of stage coaches operating from Hamilton and Galt to Berlin and beyond. The old Queen's Arms long vacant and practically ruined as a building was sold finally and made room for the Market Building and Town Hall in 1869.*

      Next we come to the John Roos house. This also had a double-deck veranda with heavy posts as was the style 1840-50. The building was later turned into a hotel known as the Market Hotel and kept by Casper Heller.

      A lot with a log cabin in the rear, occupied by Jacob Sauer, who had come from Pennsylvania, father of Mrs. John Roat.

      * See 1922 Annual Report W. H. S., p. 210.

      A harness shop occupied by John Roat, then by his son John and later by John Haugh, a son-in-law of John Roat.

      A garden. A dwelling, 4 or 5 feet lower than the street which had been filled up, where lived the Susand family. Mrs. Susand had a reputation with juveniles for tarts and molasses taffy sold in lc. bars. Her children were in the habit of selling these wares to passengers at the G.T.R. station. After her husband's death about 1860, widow Susand moved her shop to Foundry Street North, and there continued until she died. Susand was an ex-slave. In 1857 at a nomination meeting for Council, he was nominated and stood a good chance of being elected, as a joke. However, the more thoughtful element among the voters prevailed.

      A two story, frame building, lengthwise with King Street, built in the '30's. After street grading this had to be raised so that what had before been the ground floor became the cellar or basement.

      A house occupied by Wm. Hawke,-known as Bill Hawke- a mason. A stout, easy-going man. His wife was in the habit of standing in the door way, with white lace cap, smoking a clay pipe. The east end of this building was occupied by Winters, a hatter, the first hat maker in Berlin. He made the old style, broad brim, Mennonite hats in fashion up to about 1845. At the corner of Scott stood a brick building of good size with gable toward King Street, used to stable the first fire teams for a number of years. Later John Wagner had a waggon shop above and George Ward a blacksmith shop underneath. Scott Street was, however, not opened until many years later.

      A one and one-half story building rough cast, gable facing King St., occupied by H. W. Peterson, who began publishing the "Canada Museum", in 1835 and so continued until 1840 when he went to Guelph as first Registrar of the County of Wellington. This was the first newspaper published in Waterloo County.

      Jacob Hailer's house, a one and one-half story, frame building with porch along the front partly enclosed by lattice work. In this house was born in 1834, Catherine Hailer, who married Louis Breithaupt. She is said to have been the first child born in Berlin of parents who came from Germany. Hailer's barn was some distance back from the street and next along on the street front was his shop where he manufactured spinning wheels, etc., and chairs which had a large distribution. Hailer was an expert wood turner. He had two foot-power lathes and a number of German assistants from time to time, continuing his shop for about 40 years.

      A two story frame building lengthwise with King Street, erected by Dr. John Scott. He had a drug store with two good-sized windows at the front. On the east gable of the building was a sign, "Med. Hall" in large letters. The sign was legible long after Dr. Scott's death. The doctor pursued his practice on horseback for which he used three horses. He was the first medical practitioner in Berlin, coming in 1834, at the time of the cholera epidemic. For a few years before he was married he boarded at the Gaukel Hotel. His later house, after the one described, is still standing on Weber Street at the rear of the Kitchener Public Library.

      The old Scott house on King Street was later occupied by Franz Martin who kept a saloon. Martin had a musical family, with the zither as their principal instrument, which all the children could play.

      A one and one-half story, frame building, painted, occupied by Anslm Wagner, a potter.

      A brick building 1 ½ story lengthwise with King Street, the west end of which was John Eby's drug store, the rest of the building being his dwelling. This was the first regular drug store in Berlin.

      A brick building with a frame extension in the rear used by David Eby as a pump shop. Part of the brick building is still standing, the rest having been cut off for the opening of Eby Street North.

      A one story hip roof brick cottage occupied by Geo. Eby, a Notary, who came to Canada in 1804. He died in this house. A considerable fish story is told of how he followed a sturgeon in the Conestoga River, part of Grand River, and finally speared it.

      A one and one-half story building, probably rough cast, occupied by Hy. Wurm, a carpenter employed at the Simpson factory.

      A two story frame building painted red occupied by Henry S. Huber.'

      A handsome brick building, two story, with veranda along the front and ground floor considerably above the street level, with broad steps, the width of the building, leading to it, was built in 1850. Some time later it was occupied by Casper Heller and known as the Royal Exchange hotel. Following the old custom its swinging sign had "Last Chance" on the side toward the village and "First Chance" outward, referring to liquid refreshments. Heller kept a good hotel and had also a large shed and ham next east of the hotel.

      On the corner a steam grist mill was erected, about 1860. Louis Seyler, a German, was the miller. The custom was for farmers to bring in their wheat to have it ground, getting in return flour, bran and middlings, the miller retaining his toll. Later Lehnen & Shelly operated this mill.

      REMINISCENCES OF BERLIN (NOW KITCHENER) By JACOB STROH Contributed by Joseph M. Snyder.

      ___________________

      Queen Street North, West Side

      Gaukel's well at the corner of the hotel shed, the corner being later built up as the Bowman Block, now the Bank of Montreal.

      A brick warehouse belonging to the corner store of the Bowman Block. First occupants of this store were Bowman and Heins, later H. S, Huber and then by Huber and Roy.

      Opposite the Breithaupt leather store stood a one-story brick building, Dr. Pipe's surgery and later Dr. Wright's.

      A two-storey brick house lengthwise with Queen Street and with veranda on two sides, the veranda a few steps above the ground, occupied by Henry Schaefer. In 1871 Dr. Pipe lived in this house. Among other things Dr. Pipe kept bees, although he was quite afraid of them. Dr. Pipe and Henry Stroh succeeded in bringing the first Italian queen bee to this part of the country.

      A lane.

      A handsome brick house, gable roof, lengthwise with the street, the corners faced with limestone from Guelph, erected by Joseph Hobson, the surveyer, in 1860. Hobson eventually was Chief Engineer of the Great Western Railway and when that was merged with the Grand Trunk he became Chief Engineer of the latter Company and was among other things Chief Engineer of the Sarnia tunnel. Alexander MacPherson, editor and publisher of the Berlin Telegraph, later lived in the house. The site is now occupied by the head office of the Economical Fire Insurance Company.

      A two-story red frame building well back from the street built probably before 1850 by Peter Eby, identified with the "Deutsche Canadier" and with the early days of the "Telegraph". Dr. Eggert, homeopath, lived in the house 1859-1860 and later John Klippert, high constable and county bailiff.

      One and a half story brick building at the corner of Duke and Queen Streets occupied by a Mr. Von Ebenau and wife and later for a number of years by Michael Jaehle, a blacksmith. The site is now occupied by the Daily Record building.

      Duke Street.

      A large handsome building trimmed with cut stone built in 1860 by David S. Shoemaker of Bridgeport who was county registrar, The building was intended for a bank and agent's residence and so used first by the Commercial Bank which failed and later by the Merchants Bank of which R. N, Rogers was agent for a number of years. Some time later Dr. H. S. Lackner acquired the property and used it as residence and surgery. After Dr. Lackner's death the property was sold to the present occupants, the Langleys of Toronto.

      building, colonial style, with large posts at the front carrying the projecting roof, erected in 1848-49, the Waterloo Township Hall, the land for which was donated by Frederick Gaukel. General public meetings were held in this hall, among others meetings purposing to have Berlin named as county town. After consummation of this a banquet was held in the hall, which was occasionally used for such purpose. The occasion of this particular banquet was the laying of the corner stone of the new county buildings in 1852. 100 guests were present and there were a number of patriotic toasts. Later the building was used as a printing office, the "Deutsche Canadier" and the "Telegraph" being printed there for a time. Eventually the building was remodelled and enlarged and became the Methodist Church. In 1904 the St. Matthews Lutheran congregation purchased the property and later the First English Lutheran Church, which still continues in the building.

      Behind the present Kitchener Public Library, occupying the site of his ornamental garden, and still standing is Dr. Scott's residence, built in 1855. Henry Rothaermel was the contractor. Dr. Scott was the first warden of the county and first reeve of Berlin. After his death the house was occupied by M. C. Schofield who married Dr. Scott's widow. Later Israel Bowman, for many years county clerk and town clerk of Berlin, acquired the property and lived there.

      Weber Street.

      On the corner the Presbyterian Church first built 1860-61 at a size of 36 ft. by 50 ft., cost $4,500 and seating 175 persons. Rev. John McMeekin was an early minister.

      A two-story red brick building lengthwise with Queen Street, built 1855-56, the house of H. S. Huber.

      Simon Roy's house, also red brick, one and one-half story high, both of these houses were set back from the street. Mr. Roy was nurseryman and florist.

      A one-story double house lengthwise with Queen Street.

      Before Ahrens Street was continued westerly across Queen Street there was on the site a two-story unpainted weather-boarded building, the house of John Dopp.

      frame building, similar to Dopp's, the house of Christina Bloch, a widow who lived there for many years.

      A frame building, similar to Dopp's, but with gable facing Queen Street, the house of August Vetter, painter and paper-hanger.

      A vacant lot later owned by Louis Breithaupt who built, on the corner of Margaret Avenue, a residence for Judge Lacourse.

      Margaret Avenue.

      On Margaret Avenue a short distance westerly from Queen Street was the Moxley farm with house and barn. The barn was later moved to Lexington by Henry Stroh who bought it to replace one that had been struck by lightning. On the corner of Ellen Street a brick house occupied in the early days by Rev. Mr. Savage, Methodist minister, and later by John Hoffman, Jr., a druggist.

      Ellen Street.

      REMINISCENCES OF BERLIN (NOW KITCHENER) By JACOB STROH Contributed by Joseph M. Snyder.

      Part I. Settlement - Early Villagers and Buildings, Waterloo Historical Society Annual Volume 1930

      ________________

      Queen Street North, West Side

      Gaukel's well at the corner of the hotel shed, the corner being later built up as the Bowman Block, now the Bank of Montreal.

      A brick warehouse belonging to the corner store of the Bowman Block. First occupants of this store were Bowman and Heins, later H. S, Huber and then by Huber and Roy.

      Opposite the Breithaupt leather store stood a one-story brick building, Dr. Pipe's surgery and later Dr. Wright's.

      A two-storey brick house lengthwise with Queen Street and with veranda on two sides, the veranda a few steps above the ground, occupied by Henry Schaefer. In 1871 Dr. Pipe lived in this house. Among other things Dr. Pipe kept bees, although he was quite afraid of them. Dr. Pipe and Henry Stroh succeeded in bringing the first Italian queen bee to this part of the country.

      A lane.

      A handsome brick house, gable roof, lengthwise with the street, the corners faced with limestone from Guelph, erected by Joseph Hobson, the surveyer, in 1860. Hobson eventually was Chief Engineer of the Great Western Railway and when that was merged with the Grand Trunk he became Chief Engineer of the latter Company and was among other things Chief Engineer of the Sarnia tunnel. Alexander MacPherson, editor and publisher of the Berlin Telegraph, later lived in the house. The site is now occupied by the head office of the Economical Fire Insurance Company.

      A two-story red frame building well back from the street built probably before 1850 by Peter Eby, identified with the "Deutsche Canadier" and with the early days of the "Telegraph". Dr. Eggert, homeopath, lived in the house 1859-1860 and later John Klippert, high constable and county bailiff.

      One and a half story brick building at the corner of Duke and Queen Streets occupied by a Mr. Von Ebenau and wife and later for a number of years by Michael Jaehle, a blacksmith. The site is now occupied by the Daily Record building.

      Duke Street.

      A large handsome building trimmed with cut stone built in 1860 by David S. Shoemaker of Bridgeport who was county registrar, The building was intended for a bank and agent's residence and so used first by the Commercial Bank which failed and later by the Merchants Bank of which R. N, Rogers was agent for a number of years. Some time later Dr. H. S. Lackner acquired the property and used it as residence and surgery. After Dr. Lackner's death the property was sold to the present occupants, the Langleys of Toronto.


      building, colonial style, with large posts at the front carrying the projecting roof, erected in 1848-49, the Waterloo Township Hall, the land for which was donated by Frederick Gaukel. General public meetings were held in this hall, among others meetings purposing to have Berlin named as county town. After consummation of this a banquet was held in the hall, which was occasionally used for such purpose. The occasion of this particular banquet was the laying of the corner stone of the new county buildings in 1852. 100 guests were present and there were a number of patriotic toasts. Later the building was used as a printing office, the "Deutsche Canadier" and the "Telegraph" being printed there for a time. Eventually the building was remodelled and enlarged and became the Methodist Church. In 1904 the St. Matthews Lutheran congregation purchased the property and later the First English Lutheran Church, which still continues in the building.

      Behind the present Kitchener Public Library, occupying the site of his ornamental garden, and still standing is Dr. Scott's residence, built in 1855. Henry Rothaermel was the contractor. Dr. Scott was the first warden of the county and first reeve of Berlin. After his death the house was occupied by M. C. Schofield who married Dr. Scott's widow. Later Israel Bowman, for many years county clerk and town clerk of Berlin, acquired the property and lived there.

      Weber Street.

      On the corner the Presbyterian Church first built 1860-61 at a size of 36 ft. by 50 ft., cost $4,500 and seating 175 persons. Rev. John McMeekin was an early minister.

      A two-story red brick building lengthwise with Queen Street, built 1855-56, the house of H. S. Huber.

      Simon Roy's house, also red brick, one and one-half story high, both of these houses were set back from the street. Mr. Roy was nurseryman and florist.

      A one-story double house lengthwise with Queen Street.

      Before Ahrens Street was continued westerly across Queen Street there was on the site a two-story unpainted weather-boarded building, the house of John Dopp.
      frame building, similar to Dopp's, the house of Christina Bloch, a widow who lived there for many years.

      A frame building, similar to Dopp's, but with gable facing Queen Street, the house of August Vetter, painter and paper-hanger.

      A vacant lot later owned by Louis Breithaupt who built, on the corner of Margaret Avenue, a residence for Judge Lacourse.

      Margaret Avenue.

      On Margaret Avenue a short distance westerly from Queen Street was the Moxley farm with house and barn. The barn was later moved to Lexington by Henry Stroh who bought it to replace one that had been struck by lightning. On the corner of Ellen Street a brick house occupied in the early days by Rev. Mr. Savage, Methodist minister, and later by John Hoffman, Jr., a druggist.

      Ellen Street.

      REMINISCENCES OF BERLIN (NOW KITCHENER) By JACOB STROH Contributed by Joseph M. Snyder.

      Part I. Settlement - Early Villagers and Buildings, Waterloo Historical Society Annual Volume 1930

  • Sources 
    1. [S10] Book - Vol II A Biographical History of Waterloo Township and other townships of the county : being a history of the early settlers and their descendants, mostly all of Pennsylvania Dutch origin..., 449.

    2. [S3] Book - Vol I A Biographical History of Waterloo Township and other townships of the county : being a history of the early settlers and their descendants, mostly all of Pennsylvania Dutch origin..., 831.

    3. [S229] Census - ON, Waterloo, Berlin - 1871, Div 13, Page 5.

    4. [S16] Bible - Genealogical Information in the Bibles of the Waterloo Historical Society, Peter Huber bible bought in 1809.

    5. [S116] Vit - ON - Death Registration, 26479-1872 Henry Sauder Huber.

    6. [S166] Cemetery - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Mount Hope CC#4508 Internet Link .
      Allen Huber / in memory of / Henry S.Huber / who died / Sept. (23), 1872 / aged / 53 yr's. 2 mo. 15 d. [large crumbling monument]

    7. [S131] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo Twp. - 1851, Div 4 pg 7.
      Henry S. HUBER Esq. Merchant USA 33 Sweborgian b. 18-Jun
      Barbara HUBER Canada 29 Sweborgian b. 8-Mar
      Isaac HUBER Canada 10 Sweborgian b. 7-Jun
      Celinda HUBER Canada 7 Sweborgian b. 11-Oct
      Allen HUBER Canada 5 Sweborgian b. 27-Jul
      Charles HUBER Canada 2 Sweborgian b. 7-Jul
      Setony TEUFEL Germany 22 Roman Catholic b.
      John RITTER Carpenter Germany 24 Lutheran b.
      Philip MUELLER Black Smith Germany 24 Lutheran b.
      Diedrich ORTH Black Smith Germany 25 Lutheran b.

    8. [S7] News - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Berliner Journal (1859-1917), 5 Sep 1872.
      Heinrich S. Huber died 3 Sep 1872 in Berlin, 53 yrs, 3 mths, 15 days.

    9. [S123] Census - ON, Waterloo, Berlin - 1861, Div. 2 Page 11.

    10. [S2] Church Records - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Church of the New Jerusalem (Swedenborgian).
      Henry S. Huber, d. 3 Sep 1872, aged 53y, 2m, 15d, Ebr. 13. 14

    11. [S244] News - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Deutsche Canadier (1841-1865) - Index to Births, Deaths and Marriages Announced in the Deutsche Canadier, Berlin, Canada West. originally indexed by Simone Nieuwolt and Sylvie Kuppek..organised by Rosemary Ambrose, 16 Jul 1841 pg 29.
      8 Jul 1841 Pastor Bayne m. Heinrich HUBER, son of Peter Huber from Dumfries, to Barbara SCHUMACHER, daughter of Jacob S Schumacher, from Glasgow.

    12. [S131] Census - ON, Waterloo, Waterloo Twp. - 1851, Div 4 pg 190.

    13. [S2] Church Records - ON, Waterloo, Kitchener - Church of the New Jerusalem (Swedenborgian), pg 9.
      by Pastor A. O. Brickmann of Baltimore, MD

    14. [S3] Book - Vol I A Biographical History of Waterloo Township and other townships of the county : being a history of the early settlers and their descendants, mostly all of Pennsylvania Dutch origin..., 832.

    15. [S1592] Census - ON, Waterloo, Berlin - 1891, Section 2 Page 6.

    16. [S16] Bible - Genealogical Information in the Bibles of the Waterloo Historical Society, Peter Huber bible bought in 1809.
      Peter Huber married the 20 of October A. D. 1807 (clearn and probably original, new info) the love-worthy Fronica Sauder [my hand] Peter Huber

    17. [S3] Book - Vol I A Biographical History of Waterloo Township and other townships of the county : being a history of the early settlers and their descendants, mostly all of Pennsylvania Dutch origin...

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 18 Jun 1819 - , Pennsylvania, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1841 - North Dumfries Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 8 Jul 1841 - Galt (Cambridge), Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - merchant - 1851 - Waterloo Twp., Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsElected Office - councillor - warden - 1855 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChristened - 1856 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBusiness - Huber and Ahrens - - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsElected Office - Reeve of Berlin - 1857 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsElected Office - Reeve of Berlin - 1859 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Merchant - 1861 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - [Member of New Jersulem Religion] - 1861 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsElected Office - Warden for the County of Waterloo - 1862 - , Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Gentleman - 1871 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1872 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - Cause: general debility (4 years) - 3 Sep 1872 - Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - - Mount Hope Cemetery, Kitchener, Waterloo Region, Ontario, Canada Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth